Check out the heatpipes on Scythe's Grand Kama Cross 2

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 15, 2013 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Grand Kama Cross 2, heatsink

Scythe have made some uniquely shaped coolers in the past but perhaps not as strange as some of Zalman's designs.  This cooler has a V shape to it with the inner parts of that V being extended up until they touch the cooling fan and to give a bit more surface area for heat to dissipate to.  That could have made the cooler much shorter than other heatsinks if it wasn't for the height of the heatpipes beneath the actual heatsink.  That does give you a lot of clearance for RAM with tall heatspreaders, something many other coolers do not offer.  Check out [H]ard|OCP's review to see if the cooler is as quiet and effective as the advertising claims.

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"Many times in the world of CPU cooling, heatsinks look much the same from one to the next. The Grand Kama Cross 2 caught our eye due to its very unique design and we wanted to see if there was more to it than just aesthetics. The design is somewhat reminiscent of V type engine, but let's see if it has any horsepower to back it up."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Akasa's heatsink sandwich, the Venom Medusa

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2013 - 07:05 PM |
Tagged: akasa, venom medusa, air cooling, heatsink

If you are looking for a cooler that screams high performance then the Akasa Venom Medusa is the heatsink for you, assuming you have a double wide case.  At 1.3kg this is one of the heaviest coolers on the market, with measurements of 129.5x144x163mm (5x5.7x6.4") without fans, it is also one of the largest.  The two 140mm fans [H]ard|OCP used in their testing ensured that the cooler performed very quietly and it performs as well as any of the other high end aircoolers on the market.  The one drawback is the price, at $85 it costs almost as much as some self contained watercoolers.

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"Akasa is a smaller thermal solution company that does have a solid reputation. The Venom Medusa CPU air cooler is a massive unit that promises better cooling with eight high capacity heatpipes, dual 14cm "Viper" fans that promise more airflow, most of all we get promised it is a "Monster of All Extremes." Does it have a place in your next build?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Massive Thermalright HR-22 CPU Cooler Pictured

Subject: General Tech | August 5, 2013 - 11:50 PM |
Tagged: thermalright, hr-22, air cooling, heatsink, passive cooling

Additional photos have hit the Internet via Chip Hell of Thermalright’s upcoming HR-22 CPU cooler. The monstrous heatsink is the successor to the HR-02 with improvements to improve cooling and compatibility with tall memory DIMMs.

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Thermalright has not released any formal specifications, but judging from the teaser photos the HR-22 pairs eight “U” shaped 6mm heatpipes with what appears to be a nickel plated copper base plate and an absolutely massive aluminum fin stack. The fin stack has notches along the sides and the heatpipes hold the cooler up high enough so as to not get in the way of memory modules with tall heat-spreaders. The fin stack itself is about as tall as a 140mm fan. Users can use the HR-22 as a passive heatsink or with a single 140mm fan that is attached via two retention clips on either side of the fan.

Thermalright HR-22 CPU Cooler.jpg

This cooler is going to be heavy and while it is rated to support LGA 2011 platforms, clearances may be tight depending on the particular motherboard and case used. There is no word on pricing or availability, but it should be available later this year. Pricing will definitely be on the high end for air coolers and approaching that of AIO liquid coolers such as the Corsair H100i.

In the mean time, more teaser photos (showing the HR-22 installed in a system) can be found over at TechPowerUp.

I am looking forward to seeing this cooler benchmarked!

Source: Fanless Tech

Argon from SilverStone, inexpensive cooling for three sizes of system

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 22, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, heatsink, AR02, AR01

SilverStone have released three new Argon branded coolers, the mid-sized AR01, the small AR02 and the extra large AR03, of which [H]ard|OCP reviewed the first two models.  The AR01 is 120mm x 50mm x 159mm and uses three heatpipes to move the heat up to where it can be dispersed by the 120mm fan.  The AR02 is 92mm x 50mm x 134mm which makes it great for smaller systems though the 92mm is an odd size and could be hard to replace if you so desired.  Both coolers are under $35 to pick up, so while not the best performing heatsinks on the market they do very well when you look at the price to performance ratio.  You can see the full review here.

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"SilverStone comes to us today with a new series of air cooler for your AMD or Intel branded processor. The Argon series is pointed squarely at the lower cost end of its product stack. So how do these 6mm heatpipe units with "Direct Export Technology" stand up to testing in a world of great air coolers with much higher prices?"

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

A cooler from Thermaltake that knows how to stay out of the way

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 29, 2013 - 06:49 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, non-interference cooler, NiC, heatsink

One hurdle many Ivy Bridge owners have to deal with is the proximity of the DIMM slots to the CPU socket as many high end coolers impinge on the space which high DIMMs occupy.  This has lead to the adoption of low profile DIMMs or even users removing heatspreaders from their DIMMs in order to have them fit with an installed cooler. Thermaltake is addressing this issue with their new line of NiC heatsinks which do allow the use of full sized DIMMs.  This does lead to a taller heatsink, the NiC F4 that ProClockers reviewed is 155 x 140 x 50mm so you should make sure your case is wide enough to accommodate the cooler.  The design does not seem to have effected the cooling efficiency of the design, in tests it proved to match the performance of other mid-range coolers.

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"Thermaltake’s newest CPU cooler consist of four cooler models for now and the line-up is called the NiC or Non-Interference Cooler series. The reason behind the name is that the coolers allow for the builder or end user to fill all of their motherboard DIMM slots. This is something that is often not possible with most coolers because of their massive size. With that in mind, you can be at ease to know the series allows for maximum ram slot usage. It’s great that we didn't need to fill all the memory slots but it is another issue if we have to sacrifice performance. Well, you don’t have to worry because each of the coolers on this series is rated to a certain wattage level. The Thermaltake NiC F4 model we will be looking at today is rated up to 180 watts of TDP. The other three models are the F3, C4 and C5 and are rated at 160W, 200W and 230W respectively."

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Source: ProClockers

Noctua Offers Free LGA 1150 Haswell Mounting Kit Upgrade for Older Heatsinks

Subject: General Tech | March 20, 2013 - 12:05 AM |
Tagged: noctua, lga 1150, hsf, heatsink, haswell, cpu cooler

Noctua has recently announced that the company is providing free mounting kits to owners of existing coolers to make them compatible with Intel's latest LGA 1150 (Haswell) motherboards. The new NM-i115x mounting kit will allow enthusiasts to recycle their older Noctua coolers with the new platform without issue. The kit includes a new back plate with fixed struts and the necessary connectors (screws, springs, et al) to make alignment and mounting easier than previous setups.

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Because the LGA 1150 socket keeps the same mounting hole spacing as the current LGA 1156 and LGA 1155 sockets, many newer Noctua cooler will not need the mounting kit upgrade, and can simply be installed into the Haswell machine as is. In other words, if the heatsink worked with your Lynnfield, Sandy Bridge, or Ivy Bridge-based system, it will work in a Haswell system as well. According to Noctua, the following coolers are already compatible with Haswell:

NH-C14, NH-D14, NH-C12P SE14, NH-L12, NH-L9i, NH-U12P SE2, NH-U9B SE2

If your cooler was released prior to LGA 1156, you will need to grab the NM-i115x mounting kit upgrade by filling out this form. Noctua will make the kit available on its website as well as in retail stores (for a minimal charge, though the company did not provide specific pricing). You will need to provide proof of purchase for your existing cooler by sending Noctua a scan or screenshot of your invoice or receipt.

For more information on the NM-i115x, head over to the Noctua product page.

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It is nice to see Noctua standing behind its products like this, even if it only affects a small number of users that will be making the jump for LGA 775/ect to LGA 1150.

Source: Noctua

The Thermalright AXP-100 cooler keeps a low profile

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 17, 2013 - 07:05 PM |
Tagged: thermalright, axp-100, heatsink, low profile

If you need a heatsink for a low profile PC like an HTPC your choices are much more limited and the high end coolers with kilogram of metal are simply not going to fit unless you cut a blower into your case.  Thermalright saw an opening that they could fill perfectly with their new AXP-100, which weighs under 400g and is (L) 121.1mm x (W) 105.47mm x (H) 44.15mm, significantly smaller than most heatsinks on the market.  [H]ard|OCP slapped in on their test bench and were pleased to see that it beat the stock cooler handily and were even more pleased to see that it could handle an overclock.  Check out their full review here.

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"Thermalright, one of [H]’s long time favorites when it comes to CPU cooling, reaches out today with a cooler designed for smaller ITX and HTPC systems. Full nickel plating, 140mm and 120mm fan compatibility, and a mere 5.8cm height with the fan installed allows a big compatibility footprint in a very small package."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Thermalright Launches $99 Archon SB-E 2X HSF

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2012 - 01:00 AM |
Tagged: thermalright, sb-e 2x, hsf, heatsink, cpu cooler

Thermalright has announced a new tower CPU cooler called the Archon SB-E 2X. The new heatsink is a slim tower design, which is designed to not infringe on the RAM slots or PCI-E expansion slots. It measures 170mm x 155mm x 53mm and weighs just over 1.7 pounds (775 grams).

The heatsink itself is 53mm wide. The aluminum fins are attached to the baseplate using eight 6mm copper heatpipes. The contact plate and heatpipes are nickel plated with a mirror finish on the area that makes contact with the processor.

Thermalright Archon SB-E 2X.jpg

Thermalright is bundling the HSF with two of its silent-series TY-141 140mm fans. The fans are rated at 73.5 CFM and 21 dBA. Using PWM, the fans will spin anywhere between 900 and 1300 RPM. Including the two fans, the heatsink is 79.5mm wide. Thermalright claims that the heatsink will fit on LGA 2011 platforms without touching the RAM slots, however.

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The new heatsink uses Thermalright’s VX BTKII mounting system that allows pressure to be adjusted. It supports the LGA 2011, 1366, 1155, 1156, and 775 Intel sockets and the AMD FM1, AM3+, AM2+, AM2, and 939 sockets.

Thermalright Archon SB-E 2X_2.jpg

While there is no specific release date mentioned on the Thermalright website, it should be available soon. The Archon SB-E 2X will have an MSRP of $99.95 USD. At that price, it is putting itself into closed-loop watercooling territory. It will be interesting to see how well it performs and stacks up to coolers like the H80 and Noctua DH-14.

Source: Bit-Tech

SilverStone Launches Massive Nitrogon NT01-Pro CPU HSF

Subject: General Tech | November 11, 2012 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, nt01-pro, nitrogon, hsf, heatsink

SilverStone recently launched a new air cooler called the Nitrogon NT01-Pro. At 140mm (W) x 97mm (H) x 120mm (D), it looks to offer up some impressive cooling potential. The cooler is aluminum with a copper base-plate and a total of six heatpipes.

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Interestingly, the cooler can be used passively without fans or be paired with two 80mm fans to allow for faster processor overclocks. While 120mm fan support would have been ideal, with a bit of modding, you could have four 80mm fans in a push-pull configuration. It would sound like a jet engine, but would give you a great deal of cooling power.

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Other specifications of the air cooler include six 6mm heatpipes and a net weight of 470g without fans, which translates to just over 1 pound. One issue with the cooler is that it will likely cover up the top PCI-E slot when it is mounted vertically due to its 140mm width.

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The Nitrogon NT01-Pro supports both AMD and Intel processors. Specifically, it can be used on motherboards with the LGA775, 1155, 1156, 1366, and 2011 sockets on the Intel side and the AM2, AM3, FM1, and FM2 AMD sockets. It will cost €50.90 (or approximately $65 USD). More information can be found on the SilverStone website.

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What do you think of the Nitrogon NT01-Pro?

Source: SilverStone

Sandia Shows Off Prototype of Its Impeller Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 25, 2012 - 05:45 PM |
Tagged: sandia, impeller, heatsink, cooling, cooler, air bearing

A white paper by Sandia National Laboratories caught the attention of the media last year with big claims for high performance cooling. The researchers had claimed to invent a new type of heatsink based on a impeller design that was allegedly 30% more efficient at heat transfer while being smaller and quieter than traditional air coolers.

Dubbed the Sandia Cooler, the team has come up with an updated prototype that is nearly ready to come to market. Shown off in a recent video, the cooler is a small heatsink based on three relatively simple parts. A stationary disk acts as the base and area that comes into contact with the Integrated Heat Spreader (IHS) of a CPU. Then, a spinning array of curved fins resembling an impeller design is spun up by a small motor mounted in the center of the cooler.

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During an industry day, they reportedly signed two license option agreements with two companies to bring the product to market in the areas of solid state lighting (LEDS, et al) and computer hardware cooling, implying that it is getting closer to a final product that it was last year.

Interestingly, the cooler uses an “hydrodynamic air bearing” such that the spinning part of the cooler is spun up to 2,000+ RPM such that the top part separates from the bottom stationary part and rides (they use the analogy of a car hydroplaning) on a very thin layer of air. (Update: as KngRider noted, there is still some friction from the motor spinning the upper part of the cooler, however.) That thin layer of air is what facilitates heat transference from the stationary part to the spinning fins. It does raise questions of efficiency, however. How a layer of air is more efficient than thermal interface material, for example. Reportedly, the air bearing is not an issue that will impact cooling performance but it is a difficult concept to grasp considering TIM and metal-to-metal contact has always been touted as the best cooling situation.

Sandia explains that cool air is drawn into the center of the impeller as heated air is forced outwards through the spinning fins, which reportedly enables efficient heat transfer. In the video, they demonstrate that it is capable of being extremely quiet (nearly silent) despite spinning at an extremely fast rate – the noise in the first part of the video is due to the prototype motor that is not covered. They claim that the final design will use a brush-less motor that will be much quieter.

It’s an intriguing design because of its simplicity and form factor. It is reportedly able to cool more efficiently than some of the best air coolers on the market, which use such techniques as heatpipes that come into direct contact with the CPU IHS, larger fin arrays, and multiple fans. Compared to those coolers, the Sandia prototype is much smaller and simpler in its construction.

The company has further released a white paper (PDF) and has an area of its website dedicated to more information on the Sandia cooler. While I cannot vet the fluid dynamics they detail, it certainly looks good on paper. I’m excited to see this come to market and whether or not it will live up to its promise of more efficient (and quiet!) cooling. It could be an important asset in cooling computer hardware in everything from desktops to server rooms. Also, it might just be the advancement that air coolers have been looking for as far as the next jump in performance – more than simply adding additional heatpipes or fins (and dealing with weight, size, and diminishing returns as a result) can do alone.

I’ll say that I’m skeptically optimistic on this one, but I do hope that it’s the real deal. What do you think of the impeller cooler? Does it appear promising?

Source: Sandia