FanlessTech Shows Gigantic, Unreleased Heatsinks

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 19, 2014 - 04:52 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, fanless, air cooling

There are many interesting ways to pull heat away from a processor. You can submerge your device in mineral oil or even phase-change fluid (such as "Novec"). You can push cool fluid up to the thing that you are trying to remove heat from and then pump it away through a radiator. If using air, you can make use of vapor chambers and the convection current formed as devices heat up. The goal is to abuse one or more interesting material properties to store energy and move it somewhere else.

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Image Credit: HT4U.net

Or you can just have an obscene, gigantic mass of metal with more fins than the NHL. According to FanlessTech, these are three heatsinks that are not yet available (and may never be). Two of them have three towers, connected to the base by heat pipes, and the last one has four.

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Image Credit: ExtraHardware.cz

Personally, I would be a bit uncomfortable about buying a PC like that unless I needed absolutely silent or top air cooling performance. The amount that it hangs over RAM or nuzzles against add-in boards seems sketchy to me, especially if you need to swap a DIMM or two at some point, but I always use stock coolers at reference voltage and frequency so what do I know?

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Image Credit: PConline.com.cn

Yes, that would be a regular, ATX motherboard.

When will these prototypes become available? Who knows if they even will. Still, if you have a need for cooling solutions that are a little over-the-top, you might be able to get your hands on these some day. There's nothing wrong with adding more mass and surface area, rather than doing something fancy. It works, and it probably works really well.

Source: FanlessTech

Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 Heatsink Released

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 2, 2014 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: hyper 612, heatsink, fanless, cooler master, cooler

The Cooler Master Hyper 612 Ver. 2 CPU cooler is a member of their "Hyper Series", upper-mainstream product lineup. It looks to be one of the (if not the) biggest offerings in that category. Its extreme dimensions are 139mm (5.47") in length by 102mm (4.02") wide, with a height of 160.4mm (6.32"). It has a 120mm fan which basically takes up a whole side and slowly blows air across it. Some sites claim that it can be used fanless with some (but not every) CPU.

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Cooler Master is particularly proud of their "Continuous Direct Contact" technology. In other words, the heat pipes are flattened into a contact with the CPU's heatspreader (or die guard for people like Morry). This eliminates a reservoir of heat before the copper pipes can carry it to the aluminum fins and out into the air.

The heatsink is now available, but no pricing information yet (I cannot find it online).

Fanless, SFF or heavy weights, check out the best in quiet coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 23, 2014 - 03:45 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, air cooling, water cooling, quiet

Silent PC Review has just done a major update to their lists of the best Big, Small and Fanless coolers, both air and water.  The Big list requires a fair sized case in which to contain the cooler and consists of those coolers which operate at 20 dBA or less from 1m away with no more than 45°C rise over ambient.  The graph starts with the loudest 20dBA and grows more quiet with the measured temperature appearing at the noise level they tested, those with multiple values have adjustable speeds.  The Small list has the same setup but consists of coolers that should fit in most SFF cases and the fanless lacks noise ratings for obvious reasons.  Check them all out here.

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"Recommended Heatsinks lists SPCR-reviewed top cooling devices for CPUs, VGA and other hot computer parts, ordered by cooling performance and low noise. Major update on 16 Sept 2014."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

bequiet! lives up to their name with the Dark Rock Pro 3

Subject: Cases and Cooling | February 12, 2014 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: heatsink, Dark Rock Pro 3, bequiet!

At 150x137x163mm (6x5.4x6.4") in size and 1197g the Dark Rock Pro 3 is a hefty chunk of copper and aluminium.  The extra size does allow for the use of a 135mm fan on the interior with the more common 120m variety on the side which helps make this cooler very quiet even at full load.  The performance was decent but a bit of a let down considering [H]ard|OCP saw better performance from its predecessor, the Dark Rock Pro 2.  Still, if it is quiet performance you need then this is certainly a cooler worth consideration.

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"There is no doubt that when it comes to CPU air cooling, marketing terms like "category leader" and "virtually inaudible" will get your attention. be quiet!'s Dark Rock Pro 3 air cooler touts cooling up to 250 watts, which is stout at best in the world of air cooling. Does the Darck Rock Pro 3 perform and bring with it a cooling value."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Noctua puts their new NH-U12S on a diet

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 25, 2013 - 01:37 PM |
Tagged: noctua, NH-U12S, heatsink

Noctua have attempted to strike a balance between performance and profile with the NH-U12S, slimming it down to allow for tall heatspreaders to be used on RAM but without shaving off too much performance.  From the tests performed at [H]ard|OCP it seems that Noctua did exactly what they claimed, there is plenty of space to fill all your DIMM slots with any brand of RAM and the performance at stock speeds was better than average.  It is a little more expensive than some alternatives and is not the best at cooling an overclocked CPU but but of you want a slim profile and reasonably quiet performance this is a good choice.

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"The Noctua NH-U12S is well known in enthusiast circles for a few reasons. Noctua states it is because, "the NH-U12S is a complete premium quality solution that combines outstanding performance, quiet operation and excellent compatibility." And quite frankly Noctua would be very correct. Where does the value stand today?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Are you still lapping your heatsinks?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 4, 2013 - 04:14 PM |
Tagged: lapping, heatsink, DIY

Back in the ancient past of aircooling, when heatsinks did not weigh a kilogram and 120mm fans were a novelty item and not the standard many enthusiasts practiced the art of lapping.  With a water tray and automotive grade sandpaper of increasingly fine grit you could not only flatten the base of the heatsink, something that was all too necessary for some models, you could also acheive a mirror finish which helped your heat paste spread evenly.  Today you do not hear much talk of lapping either heatsinks nor the integrated heatspreader on CPUs and SPCR decided to test if it remains a good practice.  Check out the difference a proper lapping job still makes, though keep in mind lapping the IHS on your CPU will void the warranty and could weaken its structure.

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Not what you want to see!

"Lapping the CPU in a heatsink test platform is probably a controversial move that's bound to provoke reactions. Funny thing is, it was done a year ago, and photos of the CPU showing the copper top exposed by the lapping have been featured in many of our reviews. Yet, not a single comment. This article goes through the problems, investigations and explorations that led us to lap our Core i7-965 Extreme test CPU, and analyzes the results and implications."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Check out the heatpipes on Scythe's Grand Kama Cross 2

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 15, 2013 - 05:39 PM |
Tagged: scythe, Grand Kama Cross 2, heatsink

Scythe have made some uniquely shaped coolers in the past but perhaps not as strange as some of Zalman's designs.  This cooler has a V shape to it with the inner parts of that V being extended up until they touch the cooling fan and to give a bit more surface area for heat to dissipate to.  That could have made the cooler much shorter than other heatsinks if it wasn't for the height of the heatpipes beneath the actual heatsink.  That does give you a lot of clearance for RAM with tall heatspreaders, something many other coolers do not offer.  Check out [H]ard|OCP's review to see if the cooler is as quiet and effective as the advertising claims.

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"Many times in the world of CPU cooling, heatsinks look much the same from one to the next. The Grand Kama Cross 2 caught our eye due to its very unique design and we wanted to see if there was more to it than just aesthetics. The design is somewhat reminiscent of V type engine, but let's see if it has any horsepower to back it up."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Akasa's heatsink sandwich, the Venom Medusa

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2013 - 07:05 PM |
Tagged: akasa, venom medusa, air cooling, heatsink

If you are looking for a cooler that screams high performance then the Akasa Venom Medusa is the heatsink for you, assuming you have a double wide case.  At 1.3kg this is one of the heaviest coolers on the market, with measurements of 129.5x144x163mm (5x5.7x6.4") without fans, it is also one of the largest.  The two 140mm fans [H]ard|OCP used in their testing ensured that the cooler performed very quietly and it performs as well as any of the other high end aircoolers on the market.  The one drawback is the price, at $85 it costs almost as much as some self contained watercoolers.

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"Akasa is a smaller thermal solution company that does have a solid reputation. The Venom Medusa CPU air cooler is a massive unit that promises better cooling with eight high capacity heatpipes, dual 14cm "Viper" fans that promise more airflow, most of all we get promised it is a "Monster of All Extremes." Does it have a place in your next build?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Massive Thermalright HR-22 CPU Cooler Pictured

Subject: General Tech | August 5, 2013 - 11:50 PM |
Tagged: thermalright, hr-22, air cooling, heatsink, passive cooling

Additional photos have hit the Internet via Chip Hell of Thermalright’s upcoming HR-22 CPU cooler. The monstrous heatsink is the successor to the HR-02 with improvements to improve cooling and compatibility with tall memory DIMMs.

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Thermalright has not released any formal specifications, but judging from the teaser photos the HR-22 pairs eight “U” shaped 6mm heatpipes with what appears to be a nickel plated copper base plate and an absolutely massive aluminum fin stack. The fin stack has notches along the sides and the heatpipes hold the cooler up high enough so as to not get in the way of memory modules with tall heat-spreaders. The fin stack itself is about as tall as a 140mm fan. Users can use the HR-22 as a passive heatsink or with a single 140mm fan that is attached via two retention clips on either side of the fan.

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This cooler is going to be heavy and while it is rated to support LGA 2011 platforms, clearances may be tight depending on the particular motherboard and case used. There is no word on pricing or availability, but it should be available later this year. Pricing will definitely be on the high end for air coolers and approaching that of AIO liquid coolers such as the Corsair H100i.

In the mean time, more teaser photos (showing the HR-22 installed in a system) can be found over at TechPowerUp.

I am looking forward to seeing this cooler benchmarked!

Source: Fanless Tech

Argon from SilverStone, inexpensive cooling for three sizes of system

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 22, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: Silverstone, heatsink, AR02, AR01

SilverStone have released three new Argon branded coolers, the mid-sized AR01, the small AR02 and the extra large AR03, of which [H]ard|OCP reviewed the first two models.  The AR01 is 120mm x 50mm x 159mm and uses three heatpipes to move the heat up to where it can be dispersed by the 120mm fan.  The AR02 is 92mm x 50mm x 134mm which makes it great for smaller systems though the 92mm is an odd size and could be hard to replace if you so desired.  Both coolers are under $35 to pick up, so while not the best performing heatsinks on the market they do very well when you look at the price to performance ratio.  You can see the full review here.

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"SilverStone comes to us today with a new series of air cooler for your AMD or Intel branded processor. The Argon series is pointed squarely at the lower cost end of its product stack. So how do these 6mm heatpipe units with "Direct Export Technology" stand up to testing in a world of great air coolers with much higher prices?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: [H]ard|OCP