Logitech Releases G633 and G933 Headsets for Premium Gaming Market

Subject: General Tech | August 27, 2015 - 04:00 AM |
Tagged: logitech, headphones, gaming, G933, G633, DTS Headphone:X, 7.1

Today Logitech is announcing that they have added to their headset lineup with two new products.  This is a fairly big announcement as it has been around five years since Logitech did anything with their gaming headset.  Units like the recently reviewed G35 and G230 have been around since 2010.  Users have been complaining as of late about a lack of fresh products on the scene, even though those previous products have adequately filled their niche.

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The two new products coming out are the wireless G933 and the wired G633. These are under the new brand Artemis Spectrum Gaming Headsets.  The G633 has a MSRP of $149.99 putting it at the higher end of gaming headsets.  Compare this to the G35 which originally shared that MSRP, but is now around $79 at retail.  The top end G933 is a pricier option at $199.99 US.

Logitech has done a lot of work in terms of physical characteristics and the software they are using to drive these units.  Neither comes as a pure analog solution, but instead utilizes a USB connection to power the wired and wireless units.  Logitech continually refines its gaming software and this provides a great amount of flexibility when it comes to usage scenarios and audio features for these headphones.

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Powering these cans is a newly designed 40 mm driver that is created from a stiffened fabric rather than paper or plastic.  Logitech is branding these as the patent pending Pro-G audio drivers.  The engineers worked with materials people to develop the technology that is said to provide audiophile quality sound across a variety of applications.  I had asked why Logitech stayed with a 40 mm driver when other companies were utilizing larger 50 mm units which can deliver potentially deeper bass.  The answer was that they discovered that 40 mm was the sweet spot for this material to provide a flat curve without diminishing the high end.  The 50 mm prototypes just did not have the high end performance of the 40 mm units, so it was decided to sacrifice a bit of the low end to keep things more balanced and brighter.

Previously the Logitech Gaming headphones used Dolby Headphone support to simulate 3D/positional sound.  This is changing up with these latest headphones.  The new ones do support a virtual 7.1 audio solution as well as the new DTS Headphone: X support.  This is an area where Logitech has again done quite a bit of work to improve their HRTF support.  Ryan was shown around 30 different ear “models” that were used to measure how sound was reflected, refracted, and tone shifted when audio  was played around these models in multiple positions.  HRTF stands for Head Related Transfer Function.  Humans can recognize sound positioning through a lot of processing in the brain.  The brain can recognize when a sound’s tone is shifted due to the individual curves and shape of a person’s ear.  Logitech has taken this data and created a software solution that more accurately provides this effect than their previous G35 and higher headphones which features the 7.1 functionality.  This functionality will also seem more realistic when combined with a higher end driver, such as what is included with the Pro-G audio drivers.

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The boom microphone is very similar to the previous models.  It can swing down and provide some decent audio for outgoing.  It will not match more professional units, but we can only hope that it is superior to the previous generation of headphones that Logitech has put out.

One area that could potentially be controversial is that of the LED lighting on the headphones.  The headsets light up around the cups and can be changed to the tune of 16.8 million colors.  The side plates can also be swapped, so potentially custom made plates can be swapped in to show whatever logos or pictures as one desires.  One positive of this design is that the LED lights are facing to the rear of the listener’s head, so potential reflections off of a screen (or glasses) will just not happen.  The headphones also feature three programmable G-Keys, a feature that was on the previous G35 units.  It also features the mute button and the scroll wheel to control volume.  These are handy, handy things for those that have already created a dozen macros on their keyboard and could potentially start mashing buttons.  Not like I have ever done that before trying to mute some headphones…

These headphones also have a unique feature in that they can dynamically mix multiple inputs.  The G633 can mix audio from two different inputs while the G933 can handle three inputs.  There are multiple use scenarios for this such as playing on a console while having the headphones attached to a cellphone.  Users can mix and match this functionality in a variety of scenarios that will fit their lifestyle.  This is slightly more interesting for the wireless G933 as more devices can be connected, and the user can be free of a plethora of cables attached to the base unit.

The G933 also have an option of being a wired unit through analog cables.  This does provide some nice flexibility for users, as well as playing for hours more when the batteries of the wireless headphones are recharging.  This flexibility was not featured in previous wired headsets and is a nice change of pace.

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Certain products have a long lifespan when it comes to product cycles.  Headphones are one of these areas (just ask Grado and how many generations they have gone through in the past 25 years).  Logitech has done some serious groundwork to make sure that these are competitive and high quality units.  The final proof will of course be listening to these cans under multiple scenarios to see if the new drivers are in fact as good as they claim to be.  With the laser like focus that Logitech has been aiming at gaming as of late, I am pretty comfortable in the idea that these headsets are the real deal when it comes to quality audio under gaming, movies, and music situations.  Individual tastes will of course vary, but Logitech has spent a great deal of time and effort to make these competitive with the industry at large.  It is a good step forward and I look forward to hearing the results.

The G633 will be available starting in September while the G933 will come to market in an October timeframe.  The DTS Headphone:X support will be a software upgrade with the Logitech Gaming software in October.

Source: Logitech

Cooler Master updates their headset lineup with the CM Storm Sirus-C

Subject: General Tech | April 8, 2015 - 03:08 PM |
Tagged: Sirus, headphones, gaming headset, cooler master, CM Storm, audio

Many, many moons ago Josh reviewed the CM Storm Sirus Surround headphones, the first of their line and good for gaming, if not for music.  Cooler Master have released an updated version called the Sirus-C which keep the infamous gold plated USB plug while shrinking the inline sound card and reducing the number of drivers in the earcups to two, a 44 mm full range and 40 mm sub. TechPowerUp provided an overview of the new headset and came to the conclusion that these would better serve a console gamer looking for a good plug and play audio solution, but feel there are better choices for the PC gamer.  This especially holds true with the current asking price of $156 on Amazon, as there is a lot of competition at that price point.

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"CM Storm's newest do-it-all headset is put to the test. The Sirus-C is compatible with all major console systems and features its own in-line USB sound card. The design is like previous Sirus headsets on the outside, but it now uses a dual-driver setup on the inside."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: techPowerUp

SteelSeries Siberia V3 Headsets Launch

Subject: General Tech | October 1, 2014 - 07:31 PM |
Tagged: steelseries, siberia, siberia v3, prism, headphones, headset, gaming headset

My last headset was a SteelSeries Siberia V2 and it served me well. The headband was snug, in a good way, against my head and the ear cups were comfortable. Both the headphones and the microphone sounded great from my subjective listening. It died after about a year and a half, though (specifically its right speaker). Still, again, it served me well, especially considering how much usage they saw on any given day.

Now they announced a new family with four siblings, ranging from $60 up to $200 (USD).

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Starting with the cheapest, the Siberia Raw Prism, we have a USB headset with a colorful glow. It has a microphone built into the left ear cup. Unlike the rest of the Siberia line (and the Siberia V2), the mic is not retractable. You cannot extend and position it in front of your mouth. It is USB-only for Windows, Mac, and PlayStation. This USB powers and controls the aforementioned "colorful glow" through their drivers, customizable to 16.8 million colors. It has a $59.99 MSRP.

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The next level up is the true successor to the V2, the Siberia V3. The price jumps quite a bit, to $99.99 MSRP. Like the V2, it has a retractable microphone and a snug-fitting internal headband. Also like the V2, it has two 3.5mm plugs when used with the included three-ring 3.5mm to dual 3.5mm (one headphone, one mic) plug adapter. No USB support though, at least not without an external sound card.

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Which brings us to the SteelSeries V3 Prism, with an MSRP of $139.99. Instead of 3.5mm, it uses USB. I mean, how else will you control the 16.8 million colors, like the Raw. Unlike the Raw, it is a series of dots rather than a thin, circular strip. It also has a better microphone than the regular V3 (more sensitive and a wider range in frequency response - although those metrics are pretty useless when they are not charted in a graph). Again, instead of 3.5mm jacks, it uses USB. Like the Raw, you cannot connect this to a 3.5mm device. For that, you need to go up to...

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... The SteelSeries Siberia V4 Elite ($199.99 MSRP). Surprisingly, the microphone has a lower frequency response and sensitivity than the V3 Prism but, again, that does not mean that it is worse. Its speakers have a very high sensitivity, 120 dB, which likely means that they can get loud. The connector is detachable and comes with three ends: dual-3.5mm, three-ring 3.5mm, and a USB sound card. Also included, a 6-foot USB extension cable.

The headphones are now available at the SteelSeries store.

Source: SteelSeries

Creative Introduces Sound Blaster E5 Portable USB DAC and Headphone Amp

Subject: General Tech | August 30, 2014 - 11:44 AM |
Tagged: usb, Portable Audio, headphones, Headphone Amp, DAC, D/A Converter, Cirrus Logic

Creative has added a new member to their portable Sound Blaster "E" series lineup with the E5. 

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This new multi-function DAC and headphone amp features a reference-grade D/A converter chip from Cirrus Logic, the CS4398, which supports up to 24-bit/192kHz PCM audio (and technically DSD 2.8MHz/5.6MHz, though this does not seem to be implemented here). In addition to the realistic analog reproduction possible from a high quality chip like the CS4398, the Sound Blaster E5 provides amplification via a Texas Instruments TI6120A2, which Creative says gives the E5 a "best-in-class 600 ohm headphone amplifier".

Another aspect of the E5 that sets it apart from the previous E1 and E3 models is the inclusion of optical digital input/output, to go along with USB and dual 3.5mm headphone jacks. The two 3.5mm jacks can simultaniously drive two pairs of headphones, and on the back of the unit there are additional 3.5mm jacks for microphone input, line input/output, and these double as optical input/output via mini TOSLINK. (This might be geared for portable use, but would serve as a fine external sound solution for desktops as well!)

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The input stage of the E5 uses another Cirrus Logic chip, the CS5361, enabling high quality recording options from various sources at up to same 24-bit/192kHz. While supporting external microphones (as well as line/optical input) the E5 also has "built-in beamforming CrystalVoice microphones for audio recording and calls". And while the E5 is employing Creative's SBX sound processing chip, this DSP can be switched off with a button on the side of the device - a welcome option for serious music listening from high-resolution source material.

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The Sound Blaster E5 also supports digital input from iPhone and "select" Android phones (listed compatible devices include the Samsung Galaxy S4/S5, Galaxy Note 2/3, and Nexus 5/7). For portable use the E5 has a built-in rechargeable 3200mAh lithium polymer battery, which Creative says will provide up to 8 hours of playback per charge.

The Sound Blaster E5 will be available in October for $199 at Creative's online store (and likely various other retail outlets).

Source: Creative

Sounds like it is time for a roundup; headphone style

Subject: General Tech | February 14, 2014 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: audio, roundup, headphones

The Inquirer has put together a list of the 14 best headphones released so far this year, including both on ear and over the ear styles.  You won't find a single Beats model in this roundup but you will hear about a wide range of best in class headphones from a wide variety of uses from the cheapest pair that still sounds good to the best ones for travelling.  Just don't buy the ones with frogs on them.

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"Long gone are the days when people felt too embarrassed to wear a hefty pair of cans on their heads in the fear that they'd be accused to trying to look like an Ibiza DJ wannabe. The hype about on-ear headphones has helped convince the masses that, "Actually, these clumsy looking music accessories are pretty cool," or, "Why shouldn't I wear them with pride on the Tube after forking out hundreds for them?""

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: The Inquirer

Upgrade your cell phone headset

Subject: General Tech | December 2, 2013 - 04:08 PM |
Tagged: MP4Nation, headphones, Brainwavz HM9, audio

The MP4Nation Brainwavz HM9 are portable over the ear headphones with a mini-jack connection, perfect for laptops and mobiles without a proprietary jack.  Those using it on a cellphone will appreciate the microphone built in to the wires as well as the extra length that is provided.  TechPowerUp liked the sound and design of the headphones but caution you to pay attention to the price, at the $120 preorder price they are a good bargain; not so much at the recommended $150 price point.

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"MP4Nation is well known for their budget friendly headphone lineup. These solid over-ear headphones also come with a huge bundle and are built for a life on the go. Their pre-order price of $119 makes them a good price/performance option, too."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: TechPowerUp

ThermalTake at CES 2012

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 9, 2012 - 04:06 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Power Supplies, Keyboards, headphones, CES 2012, CES, cases

Last year at CES, ThermalTake had a rather sparse room of equipment to show off.  This year, the room was much fuller in terms of new and interesting products.   ThermalTake is a company that is not afraid to jump into new categories, and in this case we are seeing two areas that are a bit foreign to most PC enthusiasts.

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ThermalTake was one of the first companies that did not have a background in power supplies to actually move into that industry.  The first series of power supplies were actually quite impressive for the time, and they helped to set a new standard that would eventually be followed by the likes of Coolermaster and Corsair.  This year they are introducing some improvements in their design and component choices that should allow them to approach the quality and features of industry leaders like Silverstone and Corsair.  ThermalTake has the Platinum series which promises up to 93% efficiency and the platinum rating.  They are also offering slightly lower gold rated supplies that are now available in white.  ThermalTake is a rather fluid company when it comes to products though, and it will be interesting to see what actually gets delivered to market vs. what all was shown.  We will see the Platinum series and the white products, but some details may change as well as differences in cable choices.  They did show off the massive 1475 watt unit which is also able to power your arc welder...

Read more about this visit here.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: ThermalTake
Author:
Subject: General Tech
Manufacturer: Cooler Master

True 5.1 Surround Sound Gaming Headset

Cooler Master is a household name in the PC case world, and an established player in the cooling industry.  Not content with those two areas, Cooler Master has expanded into power supplies, keyboards, mousepads, and a plethora of other accessories where they apparently make a tidy bundle.  Coolermaster is now moving into a new area; gaming audio.  Under the “CM Storm” brand, Coolermaster is releasing its own set of cans.

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We were sent a production quality sample, but it did not come in the retail box that is availble now.

Cooler Master is hoping to deliver a profound audio experience to users with their CM Storm Sirus (not Sirius mind) True 5.1 Surround Sound Gaming Headphones.  The design and packaging certainly look impressive, but what counts in the end is the sound emanating from these products.

Read the entire article here.

Psyko's new gaming headset isn't just a Carbon copy of their last model

Subject: General Tech | April 28, 2011 - 02:01 PM |
Tagged: headphones, headset, psyko, gaming, audio

The new Psyko Carbon headset sports 7 speakers, including 40mm subs, which is supposed to surround your head with sound.  With that insane amount of power it is no surprise to see that this headset comes with its own amplifier.  The real question is whether the PsykoWave speaker virtualization technology which is intended emulate positional sound like you would have with properly set up speakers.  The Tech Report knows how well it works, so you can visit them to find out for yourself.

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"Psyko Audio Labs has updated its surround-sound gaming headset with a new Carbon model that offers a number of upgrades and a lower asking price. We have a listen to see if the Carbon is a good alternative to traditional virtualization methods."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner