MSI X99S Gaming 7 for the enthusiast with a bit of a budget

Subject: Motherboards | December 2, 2014 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: X99S GAMING 7, msi, LGA2011-3, Intel X99, Haswell-E, Dragon Gaming Series

Morry has covered the previous generation of Gaming 7 as well as $465 X99 Gaming 9 but we haven't yet seen the slightly lower priced X99 Gaming 7 which can be had for just under $300 right now.  The reduction in price does not seem to have hurt the feature set with full speed M.2 support, four PCI-E x16 slots of which three can be used for multiple GPU setups as the other lanes are tied up with SATA Express and M.2 and other storage connections.  As you may remember from Morry's reviews the UEFI is rather impressive looking and effective as well, a single push of the onboard OC Genie button will get you a mild overclock, Hardware Canucks had better luck with a manual overclock for those who have the patience.  Check out their full review of a well designed and decently priced X99 board right here.

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"MSI's X99S Gaming 7 is something of a rarity; MSI has included a full stable of gamer-centric features and yet it is quite affordable when compared to other X99 motherboards."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

ASUS' X99-A, they trimmed the price but not the features

Subject: Motherboards | November 6, 2014 - 06:18 PM |
Tagged: x99-a, X99, Intel, Haswell-E, asus

At $258 the ASUS X99-A is one of the more affordably priced X99 motherboards on the market and The Tech Report thoroughly tested it to see what, if anything, is lacking.  The board still has the "OC Socket" with extra pins which allow the certifiably insane to up their CPU voltage to 1.8V, it retains the M.2 socket, the DDR4 can hit 3000MHz even with all 8 slots populated and three of its six PCIe slots can be used together for SLI or Crossfire.  In fact The Tech Report has a very nice illustration showing how the board works with both 28 lane and 40 lane Haswell-E processors.  Check out the results of their testing right here.

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"Rather than loading up on flashy extras and extraneous accessories, Asus' X99-A motherboard focuses on the basics. It has a sensible spec, loads of builder-friendly features, and a diverse array of powerful tweaking options. Read on to see what makes this our favorite Haswell-E motherboard to date."

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Motherboards

Workstation class X99 from ASRock

Subject: General Tech | October 30, 2014 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: x99 ws, Intel X99, Haswell-E, asrock

ASRock has a Work Station class board for Haswell-E with five PCIe 3.0 slots, support for up to 128GB of RAM which can be ECC if you install an appropriate processor and on the back are four of both USB 2.0 and 3.0 ports, one eSATA ports, audio and a pair of LAN ports.  They also included A-Tuning overclocking software which seems odd for a Work Station but proved to be very important as [H]ard|OCP could not get the system they built with this board to POST at default settings and had to change UEFI settings to get it to boot.  Once it did start up the performance was solid and it was one of the better ASRock boards that [H] has reviewed though with a street price over $300 it is hard to recommend.

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"ASRock comes to us with its "Work Station" version Haswell-E motherboard. This time our out-of-box experience with its X99 WS was as rock solid as it could be and did leave us with feelings of getting to work with a quality component. As you all know, we are much more interested in how it performs at high clocks while under stress."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Eighteen-core Xeon E7 v3 Based on Haswell-EX in Q2'15

Subject: Processors | October 29, 2014 - 05:44 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-E, Haswell-EX, Ivy Bridge-EX

Last February, Intel launched the Xeon E7 v2 line of CPUs. Based on the Ivy Bridge architecture, they replaced the original Xeon E7s, developed from Sandy Bridge, that were released in April 2011. Intel is now planning to release Haswell-EX in the second quarter of 2015. No specific SKUs are listed, this information describes the product family as a whole.

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This is Ivy Bridge-EX. Haswell-EX will have 3 extra cores (and look a bit different).

To set the tone, these are not small chips. Using the previous generation as an example, Ivy Bridge-EX was over twice the size (surface area) of Ivy Bridge-E, and it contained over twice the number of transistors. While Ivy Bridge-EX was available with up to 15 physical cores per processor, double that with HyperThreading, Haswell-EX is increasing that to 18, or 36 simultaneous threads with HyperThreading. If that is not enough cores, then you can pick up an eight-socket motherboard and load it up with multiple of these.

Other than their gigantic size, these chips are fairly similar to the Xeon E5 processors that are based on Haswell-E. If you need eighteen cores per package, and can spare several thousand dollars per processor, you should be able to give someone your money in just a handful of months.

Source: KitGuru

Intel Broadwell-E Expected for Q1 2016

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Chipsets | October 23, 2014 - 03:25 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Broadwell, Broadwell-E, Haswell-E

VR-Zone China got hold of an alleged Intel leak, go figure, that talks about their next enthusiast processor platform, Broadwell-E. This architecture is mostly Haswell-E that has its (rated) feature size shrunk down to 14nm. Given an available BIOS, it is expected to support at least some existing LGA 2011-v3 motherboards with the X99 chipset. Like Haswell, they are sticking with a maximum of 40 PCIe lanes. We will need to wait for individual SKUs to see whether one or more models will be limited to 28 lanes, like the Haswell-E-based Core i7-5820K.

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Image Credit: Chinese VR-Zone

Intel claims 140W TDP, which is identical to the current three offerings of Haswell-E, for all options. The slide claims six and eight core models will be available (also identical to Haswell-E).

One bullet-point that baffled me is, "Integrated Memory Controller: 4 Channels DDR4 2400, 1 DIMM per Channel". Double-checking with the other writers here, just to make sure sure, it seems like the slide claims that Broadwell-E will only support four sticks of DDR4. This makes zero sense for a couple of reasons. First, one of the main selling points of the enthusiast platform has been the obscene amount of RAM that workstation users demand. Second, and more importantly, if it is compatible with existing motherboards, what is it going to do? Fail to POST if you install a fifth stick? This has to be a typo or referring to something else entirely.

When will you be able to get it? A bit later than we were hoping. It is expected for Q1 2016, rather than late 2015.

Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: MSI

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of MSI

MSI upped the ante with their X99S Gaming 9 AC board, combining their black and red Dragon-inspired design with support for the newest Intel LGA2011-3 socket processors and DDR4 memory modules. The board features heat sinks over all the expected areas as well as a large LED-lit heat sink over the X99 chipset. MSI also integrates an armor-style overlay covering their audio components and an overlay cover for their rear panel. One of their most interesting additions is the MSI Streaming Engine, touted to assist with graphics encoding to make up for the lack of the integrated graphics processor in the Haswell-E CPUs. As a flagship board, the MSI X99S Gaming 9 AC comes at a flagship price with an MSRP of $429.99.

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Courtesy of MSI

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Courtesy of MSI

MSI integrated an 8-phase digital power delivery system into the X99S Gaming 9 AC, combining Hi-C and Dark capacitors with super ferrite chokes for optimal power delivery with enhanced power efficiency characteristics. The board includes the following integrated features: eight SATA 3 ports; one SATA Express port; one M.2 PCIe x4 32 Gb/s port; a Qualcomm® Atheros Killer E2205 NIC; Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi and Bluetooth; five PCI-Express x16 slots; a 2-digit diagnostic LED display; on-board power, reset, CMOS clear, and OC-Genie buttons; Slow Mode boot, Multi-BIOS, OC Genie mode, and Audio Power switches; Realtek audio solution with isolated audio PCB and Nichicon audio capacitors; dedicated per-channel headphone OP-AMPs; integrated V-Check voltage measurement points; Streaming Engine with integrated AVerMedia HD H.264 encoding chip; and USB 2.0 and 3.0 port support.

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Courtesy of MSI

Continue reading our review of the MSI X99S Gaming 9 AC motherboard!

Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: EVGA

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of EVGA

The X99 Classified motherboard is EVGA's premier product offering for their Intel X99 chipset motherboard line. The board supports the Intel LGA2011-3 based processors along with DDR4 memory in a quad channel configuration. The X99 Classified board is a synthesis product for EVGA with all of the innovations from previous boards integrated for a superior offering. A premium product like this comes at a premium price point with an MSRP of $399.99.

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Courtesy of EVGA

The X99 Classified has a 10 phase digital power system and high performance solid state capacitors integrated to power the CPU under any circumstances thrown its way. EVGA designed the following features into the X99 Classified: 10 SATA 3 ports; two M.2 PCIe x4 capable ports; dual Intel Gigabit NICs - an Intel I217 and an Intel I210; five PCI-Express x16 slots; one PCI-Express x4 slot; 2-digit diagnostic LED display; on-board power, reset, and dual CMOS clear buttons; triple BIOS selector and Turbo switches; PCIe disable switch jumper block; integrated Probe IT voltage measurement system; GPU Link headers and cables; and USB 2.0 and 3.0 port support.

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Courtesy of EVGA

Technical Specifications (taken from the EVGA website)

Microprocessor support Intel Socket 2011-3 Processor
PCH Intel X99 chipset
System Memory support Supports Quad channel DDR4 up to 3000MHz+ (OC).
Supports up to 128GB of DDR4 memory.
USB 2.0 Ports 8 x from Intel X99 PCH – 6x external, 2x internal
Supports hot plug
Supports wake-up from S1 and S3 mode
Supports USB 2.0 protocol up to a 480 Mbps transmission rate
USB 3.0 Ports 6 x from Intel X99 PCH – 4x external, 2x internal
Supports transfer speeds up to 5Gbps
Backwards compatible USB 2.0 and USB 1.1 support
SATA Ports Intel X99 PCH Controller
6 x SATA 3/6G (600 MB/s) data transfer rate
- Support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, AND RAID 10
- Supports hot plug
4 x SATA3/6G AHCI Only
Onboard LAN 1 x Intel i217 Gigabit Ethernet PHY
1 x Intel i210 Gigabit Ethernet MAC
Supports 10/100/1000 Mb/sec Ethernet
Audio Creative Core 3D (CA0132) Controller
6 Channel HD Audio
PCI-E Slots 5 x PCI-E x14 Mechanical Slots
- Arrangement - 1 x16, 2 x 16, 3 x8, 4 x8*
1 x PCI-E x4 Slot

*PCI-E lane distribution listed REQUIRES 40 lane CPU

Operating Systems Supports Windows 8 / 7
Size EATX form factor
12 inches x 10.375 inches (305x264mm)

Continue reading our review of the EVGA X99 Classified motherboard!

Linux loves Haswell-E

Subject: Processors | September 25, 2014 - 02:56 PM |
Tagged: linux, X99, core i7-5960x, Haswell-E

After the smoke from their previous attempt at testing the i7 5960X CPU Phoronix picked up a Gigabyte X99-UD4-CF and have now had a chance to test Haswell-E performance on Linux.  The new processor is compared to over a dozen others on machines running Ubuntu and really showed up the competition on benchmarks that took advantage of the 8 cores.  Single threaded applications that depended on a higher clock speed proved to be a weakness as the 4790K's higher frequency allowed it to outperform the new Haswell-E processor.  Check out the very impressive results of Phoronix's testing right here.

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"With the X99 burned-up motherboard problem of last week appearing to be behind us with no further issues when using a completely different X99 motherboard, here's the first extensive look at the Core i7 5960X Haswell-E processor running on Ubuntu Linux."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Phoronix
Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: Intel

Server and Workstation Upgrades

Today, on the eve of the Intel Developer Forum, the company is taking the wraps off its new server and workstation class high performance processors, Xeon E5-2600 v3. Known previously by the code name Haswell-EP, the release marks the entry of the latest microarchitecture from Intel to multi-socket infrastructure. Though we don't have hardware today to offer you in-house benchmarks quite yet, the details Intel shared with me last month in Oregon are simply stunning.

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Starting with the E5-2600 v3 processor overview, there are more changes in this product transition than we saw in the move from Sandy Bridge-EP to Ivy Bridge-EP. First and foremost, the v3 Xeons will be available in core counts as high as 18, with HyperThreading allowing for 36 accessible threads in a single CPU socket. A new socket, LGA2011-v3 or R3, allows the Xeon platforms to run a quad-channel DDR4 memory system, very similar to the upgrade we saw with the Haswell-E Core i7-5960X processor we reviewed just last week.

The move to a Haswell-based microarchitecture also means that the Xeon line of processors is getting AVX 2.0, known also as Haswell New Instructions, allowing for 2x the FLOPS per clock per core. It also introduces some interesting changes to Turbo Mode and power delivery we'll discuss in a bit.

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Maybe the most interesting architectural change to the Haswell-EP design is per core P-states, allowing each of the up to 18 cores running on a single Xeon processor to run at independent voltages and clocks. This is something that the consumer variants of Haswell do not currently support - every cores is tied to the same P-state. It turns out that when you have up to 18 cores on a single die, this ability is crucial to supporting maximum performance on a wide array of compute workloads and to maintain power efficiency. This is also the first processor to allow independent uncore frequency scaling, giving Intel the ability to improve performance with available headroom even if the CPU cores aren't the bottleneck.

Continue reading our overview of the new Intel Xeon E5-2600 v3 Haswell-EP Processors!!

Intel Sent Us a Containment Chamber with Parts Inside

Subject: Motherboards, Processors, Chipsets, Memory, Storage | September 5, 2014 - 01:21 PM |
Tagged: X99-Deluxe, SSD 730, Intel, Haswell-E, ddr4, asus, 5960X

Okay, I'll be the first to admit that I didn't know what I was getting into. When a couple of packages showed up at our office from Intel with claims that they wanted to showcase the new Haswell-E platform...I was confused. The setup was simple: turn on cameras and watch what happens.

So out of the box comes...a containment chamber. A carefully crafted, wood+paint concoction that includes lights, beeps, motors and platforms. 

Want to see how Intel promotes the Core i7-5960X and X99 platform? Check out this video below.

Our reviews of products included in this video: