This Wacom "Cintiq" Really Is Based on an Intuos

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 8, 2014 - 02:09 PM |
Tagged: wacom, Cintiq, Intuos, hack

A couple of years ago, you might remember my review of the Wacom Cintiq 22HD. It was not a review unit. I was originally saving for the Cintiq 24HD until the 22HD and the 24HD Touch were announced. At that point, I was making decision whether to upgrade to the 24HD with a touchscreen for Windows 8 development, or save some money and get the 22HD. If you have read my many editorials on Windows Store certification requirements, you might guess that, at least I believe, I made the right decision.

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Image Credit: Hack a Day

This purchase was actually the second graphics tablet that I owned. Years earlier, I purchased an Adesso CyberTablet 12000 but had problems with drawing in one location and seeing the results in another. I, then, transitioned to scanning pencil-and-paper and inking/filling them with a mouse. It was at that point that I took a gamble on a Wacom Cintiq.

Why am I telling this story? Wacom Cintiqs are based on the same technology as their Intuos tablets, even down to pen compatibility, with a display built in. Well, at Hack a Day, one of their clever readers decided to make their own Cintiq out of what appears to be a Wacom Intuos3 A5. Basically, he fit a replacement 9.7-inch, 2048x1536 display, designed for Retina iPads and similar tablets, behind the touch sensor. It apparently worked without much fuss.

You can find Wacom Intuos3 6 x 8-inch pen tablets for about 120-150$ used. You can also find a 9.7-inch 2048x1536 panel and the other necessary hardware for about $70. While it is not an exact replacement for a Wacom Cintiq, it is the best you will do for under $250 (or even under $900).

Source: Hack a Day

Your Friday FUD; the hackable hospital

Subject: General Tech | April 25, 2014 - 09:52 AM |
Tagged: hospital, hack, fud

If you thought that antibiotic resistant infections were the only sort of bug you had to worry about when you are hospitalized then this story on Wired is not for you.  Scott Erven is head of information security for Essentia Health which operates a network of 100 facilities in the US and he has released some shocking news about the hackability of hospital equipment.  It would seem that almost every life saving device is hackable, in many cases quite easily hacked by remote.  Implantable defibrillators can be set off by an attacker or worse, prevented from shocking a heart when it should, drug infusion pumps can have the delivered dosage changed,  maximum radiation levels delivered by CT scans can be changed and a host of other rather terrifying vulnerabilities make going to the hospital even more anxiety inducing than it already was.  Your best bet is to try to stay healthy.

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"When Scott Erven was given free rein to roam through all of the medical equipment used at a large chain of Midwest health care facilities, he knew he would find security problems–but he wasn’t prepared for just how bad it would be."

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Source: Wired

Check out these inventive hacks for a Sci-Fi themed contest

Subject: General Tech | April 22, 2014 - 09:37 AM |
Tagged: hack, valve, glados, tf2, kick ass

Hack a Day have been accepting entries to their Sci-Fi contest for long enough that they have a few worth showing off before the entry deadline of April 29th, specifically the Valve themed ones.  A table top sized level 1 sentry gun from TF2 is being entered, perhaps not as heavy duty as  the one currently guarding Valve HQ but destined to be able to fire paint balls if all goes to plan.  There is a French team who are modifying some personal assistant software called RORI into a replica of GLaDOS, hopefully a version at least slightly less murderous than the original while another team is going about creating a physical version of the homicidal AI complete with a camera to allow face tracking.  Check these entrants and other in the full Hack a Day post.

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"While most of the entries to our Sci-Fi contest come from movies and TV shows, a select few are based on the Valve universe, including a few builds based on Portal and Team Fortress 2."

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Source: Hack a Day

Learn about infrared communications and maybe have a bit of fun too

Subject: General Tech | September 13, 2013 - 09:21 AM |
Tagged: reverse engineering, IR sensor, hack, DIY, arduino

You can buy the USB Infrared Toy v2 from Dangerous Prototypes and get right to turning cheaply made IR devices off and on but you would miss out on a chance to build one yourself.  If you follow the links from Slashdot you will get a quick tutorial on how to determine the oscillation frequency of a broadcaster by looking at the components of the circuit and how to use an Arduino UNO to create your own.  If you are already familiar with this type of project consider teaching someone who needs their fear of electronic devices reduced through understanding how these magic boxes work.

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"Cheap home alarms, door opening systems and wireless mains switches can be bypassed with low-cost and home-made devices that can replicate their infrared signals. Fixed-code radio frequency systems could be attacked using a $20 'toy', or using basic DIY componentry."

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Source: Slashdot

Block Second Generation GSM texts and calls

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | August 26, 2013 - 10:05 AM |
Tagged: sweet justice, GSM, hack

[H]ard|OCP has stumbled upon some research even more wonderful than TV-B-Gone, a way to mod your GSM phone to be able to block the reception of phone calls and texts on cellphones using the same provider as you do.  No longer will idiots who are unable to watch a movie in the theater without constantly calling their friends to let them know what they think of it impinge upon your experience.  The hack essentially makes your phone respond to every query from the phone provider as being the target device for the call or text and thanks to a tweak to the software on the phones baseband processor the hacked phone responds to that query before the legitimate phone has a chance.  This will not work on 3G or 4G phones as it is only effective against GSM but the researchers who developed the tweak estimate that 11 modified phones would be enough to completely take down the ability of Germany's third largest provider to provide service in a single cell.

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"By making simple modifications to common Motorola phones, researchers in Berlin have shown they can block calls and text messages intended for nearby people connected to the same cellular network. The method works on the second-generation (2G) GSM networks that are the most common type of cell network worldwide. In the U.S., both AT&T and T-Mobile carry calls and text messages using GSM network."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP

Bring dead data on an SD card back to life with the power of Arduino

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2013 - 09:28 AM |
Tagged: arduino, hack, sd card

It would seem that there is more than one way to access an SD Card, and the usual interface used by your devices called SDIO can be the failure point preventing you from accessing your data.  The alternative method is called SPI mode which is significantly slower but also less complex which means that when SDIO fails you may still be able to access and copy your data using SPI mode.  Over at Hack a Day you can read about how to use a Playduino One Arduino clone and a SD card shield along with some custom Python scripts to recover those vacation snaps. 

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"A few days ago, one of [Severin]‘s SD cards died on him, Instead of trashing the card, he decided to investigate what was actually wrong with the card and ended up recovering most of the data using an Arduino and an immense amount of cleverness."

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Source: Hack a Day

Gain root to your Chromecast dongle

Subject: General Tech | July 29, 2013 - 11:19 AM |
Tagged: streaming, media, google. chrome, chromecast, hack

The Chromecast streaming dongle you heard about just a few days ago has now been opened up thanks to a quickly discovered exploit.  As a bonus, the page on Hack a Day also shows off more of the internals of the device including 17 unused connection just begging for hacks to be created. The exploit allows you to dial in to a root shell which will exist on port 23 although as of now there is little you can do but examine the modified Google TV OS but this should change as creative people have a chance to play with the new device.

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"Well that didn’t take long. The team over at GTVHacker have worked their magic on Chromecast. The HDMI dongle announced by Google last week was so popular they had to cancel their 3-free-months of Netflix perk. We think the thing is worth $35 without it, especially if we end up seeing some awesome hacks from the community."

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Source: Hack a Day

Prius owners can be annoying but this is going a bit too far

Subject: General Tech | July 26, 2013 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: prius, hack

At Defcon this year there will be some rather disturbing hacks presented dealing with the popular Prius hybrid car along with some less dangerous examples.  While convincing your car it is going 199 mph when it is standing still is somewhat amusing, the ability to disable the brakes while the car is in motion is a much more serious vulnerability.  The presenters will also show how the assisted parking feature can be used to turn the wheel while a car is at highway speeds which could well cause serious accidents.  This is not quite the Hollywood-style complete remote control of a car you should check out the story at Hack a Day to get an idea of what is now possible on at least one model of vehicle.

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"This one’s a treasure trove of CAN bus hacks that will scare the crap out of an unsuspecting driver — or worse. [Charlie Miller] and [Chris Valasek] are getting ready to present their findings, which were underwritten by DARPA, at this year’s Defcon. They gave a Forbes reporter a turn in the driver’s seat in order to show off."

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Source: Hack a Day

Hackers Compromise Ubuntu Forums Database, Deface Website, And Make Off With The Encrypted Passwords and Email Addresses of Nearly 2 Million Users

Subject: General Tech | July 21, 2013 - 09:16 PM |
Tagged: ubuntu forums, ubuntu, hack, Data Breach, Customer Data, canonical

A group of hackers attacked and defaced the  Canonical-backed Ubuntu Forums website yesterday. The hackers used an exploit to gain unauthorized access to the forum database and made off with data from approximately 1.82 million users. To make matters worse, the attackers then defaced the forum site itself by placing a landing page poking fun at the site administrators and boastfully including two twitter handles: @Sputn1k_ and a mention of @rootinabox.

Canonical has not released details on how the attackers accomplished the data breach, but stated that its security team is working to get the site back up and looking into what exactly happened.

From what has been discovered thus far, the hackers have reportedly made off with the passwords, usernames, and email addresses of all its users.

The company recommends that users change passwords on any other services immediately if they used their Ubuntu Forums password for log-ins on other websites or online services.

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ZDNet managed to snag a screenshot of the defaced web page.

Fortunately, all of the passwords in the database were salted and hashed, and not stored in plain text. The exact hashing method was not detailed, however. Also, other Ubuntu services were not affected and user data in services such as Ubuntu One (Canonical’s cloud storage offering) is still safe.

If you had an account on the Ubuntu Forums and used the same password, you should change your passwords now just to be on the safe side. Users of the forum should keep an eye on this announcement page for more details on the hack and updates on the forum restoration process as it progresses.

With just $70, you can save an underprivileged Retina.

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Displays | April 22, 2013 - 02:34 PM |
Tagged: LG, ips, hack

Operators are standing by...

Of course Apple is not a primary manufacturer of LCD panels; like everyone else, they buy their panels from someone like LG. Due to how much Apple loves IPS technology, which I cannot blame them for, they in fact do purchase their displays from LG.

If you have an itchy soldering iron, so can you.

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According to EmertHacks, the LG part number for retina iPad screens is LP097QX1-SPA1. The blog post states that he could find the panel for as cheap as $55, but my own digging game up with costs between $60 and $200 plus shipping. These panels are mostly destined to iPad repair shops, but you can give it a better home.

With under $20 of other parts, this panel could be attached to a DisplayPort connection. All said and done, you could have a 2048x1536 9.7" display with an 800:1 static contrast ratio for about $70.

Source: EmertHacks