NVIDIA Boosts the Sub-$200 market with the GTX 650 Ti Boost

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 26, 2013 - 04:41 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, hd 7790, gtx 650 ti boost, gtx 650 Ti, gpu boost, gk106

Why Boost you may ask?  If you guessed that NVIDIA added their new Boost Clock feature to the card you should win a prize as that is exactly what makes the GTX 650Ti special.  With a core GPU speed of 980MHz, boosting to 1033MHz and beyond this card is actually aimed to compete with AMD's HD7850, not the newly released HD7790, at least the 2GB model is.  Along with the boost in clock comes a wider memory pipeline and a corresponding increase in ROPs.  The 2GB model should be about $170, right on the cusp between value and mid-range but is the price worth admission?  Get a look at the performance at [H]ard|OCP.

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"NVIDIA is launching the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost today. This video card is priced in the $149-$169 price range, and should give the $150 price segment another shakedown. Does it compare to the Radeon HD 7790, or is it on the level of the more expensive Radeon HD 7850? We will find out in today's latest games, you may be surprised."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

The GTX 650 Ti Gets Boost and More Memory

In mid-October NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 650 Ti based on GK106, the same GPU that powers the GTX 660 though with fewer enabled CUDA cores and GPC units.  At the time we were pretty impressed with the 650 Ti:

The GTX 650 Ti has more in common with the GTX 660 than it does the GTX 650, both being based on the GK106 GPU, but is missing some of the unique features that NVIDIA has touted of the 600-series cards like GPU Boost and SLI.

Today's release of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST actually addresses both of those missing features by moving even closer to the specification sheet found on the GTX 660 cards. 

Our video review of the GTX 650 Ti BOOST and Radeon HD 7790.

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Option 1: Two GPCs with Four SMXs

Just like we saw with the original GTX 650 Ti, there are two different configurations of the GTX 650 Ti BOOST; both have the same primary specifications but will differ in which SMX is disabled from the full GK106 ASIC.  The newer version will still have 768 CUDA cores but clock speeds will increase from 925 MHz to 980 MHz base and 1033 MHz typical boost clock.  Texture unit count remains the same at 64.

Continue reading our review of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST graphics card!!

Podcast #222 - NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti, Western Digital RE 4TB, Windows 8 Tablets, and more!

Subject: General Tech | October 11, 2012 - 11:17 AM |
Tagged: windows 8, WD, RE, podcast, Iconia, gtx 650 Ti, acer, 7990, 650ti, 4TB

PC Perspective Podcast #222 - 10/11/2012

Join us this week as we talk about the NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti, Western Digital RE 4TB, Windows 8 Tablets, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, and Allyn Malvantano

This Podcast is brought to you by MSI!

Program length: 1:15:10

Podcast topics of discussion:

  1. Week in Reviews:
    1. 0:01:15 Corsair Dominator Platinum Contest!
    2. 0:03:30 ASUS P8Z77-V Deluxe Motherboard Review
    3. 0:04:45 Interface Design: Think like an Engineer
    4. 0:06:50 NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti 1GB Review
    5. 0:21:30 Seasonic X-Series 1250W Gold PSU Review
    6. 0:23:55 Western Digital RE RAID 4TB Review
  2. 0:29:45 This Podcast is brought to you by MSI!
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 0:30:33 AMURICA! JERBS! Lenovo Opening Line in US
    2. 0:31:15 Qualcomm Joins HSA Foundation
    3. 0:36:00 Acer Talks about Their Windows 8 Tablets
      1. Acer Iconia W700
      2. Acer Iconia W510
    4. 0:41:40 7990 is a Thing? Well Now There's a Cheaper Thing of the Thing
    5. 0:44:20 AMD Z-Series APU for Tablets
    6. 0:48:15 Logitech Makes Their First Mechanical Keyboard
    7. 0:49:40 Thermaltake Level 10 GT Battle Edition Case
    8. 0:52:20 AMD Radeon Memory RAMDisk
  4. Closing:
    1. 1:01:00 Hardware / Software Pick of the Week
      1. Ryan: Galaxy Nexus Extended Battery
      2. Jeremy: Play with some MRAM
      3. Josh: Video cards are cheap
      4. Allyn: 45 3.5" HDD's in a 4U rack - DIY (3TB = 135TB / 4TB = 180TB)
  1. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  2. http://pcper.com/podcast
  3. http://twitter.com/ryanshrout and http://twitter.com/pcper
  4. Closing/outro

 

NVIDIA's GTX 650 Ti, the new sub-$200 controller

Subject: General Tech | October 9, 2012 - 01:50 PM |
Tagged: gk106, gtx 650 Ti, kepler, nvidia

The sub-$200 GPU market just got a little more crowded with the arrival of NVIDIA's GTX 650 Ti, available for $160 on NewEgg.  That price matches an XFX HD 7850 if you include the $20 MIR, otherwise there are several other models available for around $180.  That establishes the competition as far as the cost to purchase but it is the performance competition that really matters.  The Tech Report tried out the overclocked GeForce GTX 650 Ti 2GB AMP! Edition from Zotac and the results did not favour NVIDIA, though in some cases the results were quite close.  In the end they felt that users deciding between these cards should ask themselves two questions; do you need the smaller physical size of the GTX 650 Ti for an SFF build and which game would you rather get for free, Assassin's Creed 3 or Sleeping Dogs?

You can read Ryan's full review here, if you haven't already.

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"Nvidia's new GeForce GTX 650 Ti fills the last great gap in the 600-series lineup, offering Kepler goodness between $149 and 179 or so. We've taken one of the more upscale variants of the new card and delved inside the second to see how it stacks up against the competition."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

Another GK106 Completes the Stack

It has been an interesting year for graphics cards and 2012 still has another solid quarter of releases ahead of it.  With the launch of AMD's 7000-series back in January, followed by the start of NVIDIA's Kepler lineup in March, we have had new graphics cards on a very regular basis ever since.  And while AMD's Radeon HD 7000 cards seemed to be bunched together a bit better, NVIDIA has staggered the release of the various Kepler cards, either because of capacity at the manufacturing facilities or due to product marketing plans - take your pick. 

Today we see the completion of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 600 stack (if you believe the PR at NVIDIA) with the release of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti, a $150 graphics card that fills in the gap between the somewhat anemic GTX 650 and GT 640 cards and the most recently unveiled card, the GTX 660 2GB that currently sells for $229. 

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The GTX 650 Ti has more in common with the GTX 660 than it does the GTX 650, both being based on the GK106 GPU, but is missing some of the unique features that NVIDIA has touted of the 600-series cards like GPU Boost.  Let's dive into the product and see if this new card will be the best option for those of you with $150 graphics budgets.

Continue reading our review of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti 1GB!!!

NVIDIA Preparing New Mid-range Kepler Graphics Cards

Subject: General Tech | July 10, 2012 - 04:20 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, kepler, gtx 660 Ti, gtx 660, gtx 650 Ti, gtx 640, graphics cards, gpu

We have seen and reviewed NVIDIA’s high-end Kepler graphics cards, but the company’s mid-range line has been even harder to find than the GTX 680 was a couple months ago. That may be about to change though, as recent rumors suggest that the company is preparing at least three mid-range graphics cards for public release.

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The current GT 640. Expect the refresh to look very similar.

The cheapest rumored card is a refresh of the existing GeForce GT 640. The refresh is slated for an August 2012 release and it takes the existing GK107 GPU with 384 CUDA cores and pairs it with GDDR5 memory instead of the currently used GDDR3. Videocardz predicts that the move to GDDR5 will bump the price up to a bit over $100.

The next card up will reportedly cost around $150 and will be released in August. The GeForce GT 650 Ti will allegedly be based around the GK106 GPU with 960 CUDA cores enabled. It will likely be paired with up to 2GB of GDDR5 memory and a 192-bit memory interface. This card will likely be the high-end HTPC and/or very entry level gaming card on the NVIDIA side.

However, for those serious about wanting to get into gaming, they should probably spend a bit more on the GPU and get at least the GTX 660. This rumored card is using a GK106 GPU with 1152 CUDA cores enabled and an alleged 1.5GB of GDDR5 memory with a 192-bit interface. As far as pricing, it will be positioned between the GT 650 Ti and the GeForce GTX 670 – somewhere in the $200-300 range.

Interestingly, if rumors turn out to be true, there may be yet another new graphics card that would fill the performance (and price) void between the GTX 660 and GTX 670: the GeForce GTX 660 Ti. Allegedly, the GTX 660 Ti would be very close to the GTX 670 as far as specifications are concerned. Both cards are based on the GK104 Kepler GPU (which we recently reviewed) and would have 1344 CUDA cores enabled. Where the two differ in the predicted specifications is memory. While the GeForce GTX 670 has either 2GB or 4GB of GDDR5 memory on a 256-bit interface, the GTX 660 Ti will have 1.5GB or 3GB of GDDR5 memory with a 192-bit interface. This card is also predicted to be released in August with the above mentioned NVIDIA GPUs. You can expect this card to be priced in the $300 to $400 dollar range, with an emphasis on the former for reference designs with 1.5GB of memory.

All these rumored cards should really help NVIDIA to flesh out its Kepler lineup and take on AMD on all fronts. These cards (assuming the rumors hold true, of course) should also be much easier to find and get a hold of since they are probably using binned chips that could not be sold as a GTX 670 or GTX 680 which were difficult to find in stock at launch.

What do you think about these rumors, do they sound plausible? Have you been holding off on Kepler until cheaper cards are released? Let us know in the comments below. You can find more information on the rumored graphics cards here.

Source: Videocardz