Overclocked and custom cooled, check out ASUS' custom GTX 650 Ti card

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 1, 2013 - 01:58 PM |
Tagged: asus, gtx 650 ti boost, DirectCU II, factory overclocked

The sub-$200 GPU market is getting crowded which is great for enthusiasts without pockets deep enough to drop $400+ on a GPU as they can upgrade a card now and consider getting a second card some time down the road.  At $175 ($165 after MIR) the ASUS GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost DirectCU II OC 2GB is fully customized with a boost clock of 1085MHz though a stock 6GHz effective on the RAM.  Thanks to the impressive design and cooling of the card [H]ard|OCP pushed those up to 1150MHz and 6.2GHz on the RAM which pushed its performance even further passed the XFX Radeon HD 7790 Black Edition that it tested against. 

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"Today on the test bench for your reading pleasure, we have the ASUS GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost DirectCU II OC 2GB that comes in at the $175 mark. We will compare it to the XFX Radeon HD 7790 Black Edition 2GB to determine which factory overclocked card can run circles around the other."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: PC Perspective

The GPU Midrange Gets a Kick

I like budget video cards.  They hold a soft spot in my heart.  I think the primary reason for this is that I too was once a poor college student and could not afford the really expensive cards.  Ok, so this was maybe a few more years ago than I like to admit.  Back when the Matrox Millennium was very expensive, I ended up getting the STB Lightspeed 128 instead.  Instead of the 12 MB Voodoo 2 I went for the 8 MB version.  I was never terribly fond of paying top dollar for a little extra performance.  I am still not fond of it either.

The sub-$200 range is a bit of a sweet spot that is very tightly packed with products.  These products typically perform in the range of a high end card from 3 years ago, yet still encompass the latest features of the top end products from their respective companies.  These products can be overclocked by end users to attain performance approaching cards in the $200 to $250 range.  Mind, there are some specific limitations to the amount of performance one can actually achieve with these cards.  Still, what a user actually gets is very fair when considering the price.

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Today I cover several flavors of cards from three different manufacturers that are based on the AMD HD 7790 and the NVIDIA GTX 650 Ti BOOST chips.  These range in price from $129 to $179.  The features on these cards are amazingly varied, and there are no “sticker edition” parts to be seen here.  Each card is unique in its design and the cooling strategies are also quite distinct.  Users should not expect to drive monitors above 1920x1200, much less triple monitors in Surround and Eyefinity.

Now let us quickly go over the respective chips that these cards are based on.

Click here to read the entire article!

NVIDIA Boosts the Sub-$200 market with the GTX 650 Ti Boost

Subject: Graphics Cards | March 26, 2013 - 04:41 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, hd 7790, gtx 650 ti boost, gtx 650 Ti, gpu boost, gk106

Why Boost you may ask?  If you guessed that NVIDIA added their new Boost Clock feature to the card you should win a prize as that is exactly what makes the GTX 650Ti special.  With a core GPU speed of 980MHz, boosting to 1033MHz and beyond this card is actually aimed to compete with AMD's HD7850, not the newly released HD7790, at least the 2GB model is.  Along with the boost in clock comes a wider memory pipeline and a corresponding increase in ROPs.  The 2GB model should be about $170, right on the cusp between value and mid-range but is the price worth admission?  Get a look at the performance at [H]ard|OCP.

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"NVIDIA is launching the GeForce GTX 650 Ti Boost today. This video card is priced in the $149-$169 price range, and should give the $150 price segment another shakedown. Does it compare to the Radeon HD 7790, or is it on the level of the more expensive Radeon HD 7850? We will find out in today's latest games, you may be surprised."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

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Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

The GTX 650 Ti Gets Boost and More Memory

In mid-October NVIDIA released the GeForce GTX 650 Ti based on GK106, the same GPU that powers the GTX 660 though with fewer enabled CUDA cores and GPC units.  At the time we were pretty impressed with the 650 Ti:

The GTX 650 Ti has more in common with the GTX 660 than it does the GTX 650, both being based on the GK106 GPU, but is missing some of the unique features that NVIDIA has touted of the 600-series cards like GPU Boost and SLI.

Today's release of the GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST actually addresses both of those missing features by moving even closer to the specification sheet found on the GTX 660 cards. 

Our video review of the GTX 650 Ti BOOST and Radeon HD 7790.

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Option 1: Two GPCs with Four SMXs

Just like we saw with the original GTX 650 Ti, there are two different configurations of the GTX 650 Ti BOOST; both have the same primary specifications but will differ in which SMX is disabled from the full GK106 ASIC.  The newer version will still have 768 CUDA cores but clock speeds will increase from 925 MHz to 980 MHz base and 1033 MHz typical boost clock.  Texture unit count remains the same at 64.

Continue reading our review of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 650 Ti BOOST graphics card!!