Author:
Manufacturer: EVGA
Tagged: nvidia, gtx 460, gpu, evga, 2win

A Card Unlike Any Other

Introduction

In all honesty, there aren't many graphics cards that really get our attention these days.  There are GPUs that do that - releases like the Radeon HD 6990 and the GeForce GTX 590 get our juices flowing to see what new performance and features they can offer.  But in terms of individual vendor-specific designs, there are very few that make us "perk up" much more than just seeing another reference card come across the test bed.  

The ASUS ARES dual-5870 card was probably the last one do to that - and for $1200 is better have!  EVGA is ready with another card though that definitely made us interested, and for a much more reasonable price of $419 or so.

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The EVGA GeForce GTX 460 2WIN is a custom built card that combines a pair of GTX 460 1GB GPUs on a single PCB to create a new level of performance and pricing that we found was unmatched in the market today.  And even better, the features improved as well by utilizing the power of both GPUs in an SLI configuration.  

Read on and see why the GTX 460 2WIN might be my new favorite graphics card!

NVIDIA Synergy will offer discrete and integrated GPU support on Sandy Bridge

Subject: Graphics Cards, Motherboards | April 26, 2011 - 02:19 PM |
Tagged: virtu, synergy, optimus, nvidia, lucid, gpu

Remember when we previewed a piece of software from Lucid called Virtu that promised the capability to combine processor graphics features of the Intel Sandy Bridge lineup with the performance and DX11 support of discrete graphics cards from NVIDIA and AMD?  The ideas was pretty simple but it addressed one of our major complaints about the initial Sandy Bridge processor launch: the IGP features like fast video transcode acceleration and ultra-low-power video acceleration were unavailable to users that chose to also use a discrete graphics solution.

Lucid's Virtu software running in our previous testing

Lucid's solution was to "virtualize" the GPUs and use a software layer that would decide which applications to run on the discrete GPU and which to run on the integrated processor graphics on the Intel CPU.  There were some limitations including the need to have the displays connected to the IGP outputs rather than the discrete card and that the software worked on a rather clunky white-list implementation.  Also, discrete graphics control panels were a bit of a headache and only worked with NVIDIA cards and not in all cases even then.  

Virtu was to be distributed through motherboard vendors starting with the release of the Z68 chipset (as it was the first mainstream chipset to support overclocking AND display outputs) but now it appears that NVIDIA itself is diving into the same realm with a new piece of software called "Synergy".  

Check out more after the break!

Source: VR-Zone

Adding to the sub-$100 GPU market with the Radeon 6670 and 6570

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 19, 2011 - 01:08 PM |
Tagged: turks, northern islands, gpu, amd

The new Turk based Radeon HD 6670 and HD 6570 are intended to replace the Redwood-based HD 5670 and HD 5570 at a price of $99 and $79 respectively.  The cards are very similar to the cards they replace so you should not expect miracles from them.  They do have reduced power draw and are both low profile cards making them a good choice for HTPCs and AnandTech is quick to point out that these are the fastest cards not requiring an external power supply on the market right now.

 

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"Two weeks ago we saw the paper launch of the Radeon HD 6450, the low-end member of AMD’s Northern Islands family of GPUs. It was a solid product for HTPC use and a very notable improvement over the 5450 it replaced, but it was an uncharacteristically delayed launch for AMD. At the same time we noted that the Northern Islands family had one more GPU we had not seen: Turks."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: AnandTech

ASUS' EAH6950 & ENGTX570 DirectCU II, twins with different parents

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 18, 2011 - 01:24 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, gpu, asus, amd

ASUS has released two new cards with their DirectCU II custom cooling solution and accompanying overclock.  The are very different as one is a NVIDIA GTX570 and the other an AMD HD6950.  [H]ard|OCP was less than impressed with the out of the box overclock of 10MHz on the GPU and simply reference speeds for the GDDR5, so they overclocked the cards to speeds much higher.

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"ASUS has released two enthusiast friendly overclocking video cards: the EAH6950 DirectCU II and the ENGTX570 DirectCU II. The question is which one is better, and does overclocking these change the victor. We test each out of the box and overclocked in Lost Planet 2, F1 2010, Civilization V, and Battlefield Bad Company 2."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP