Asus Launches GTX TITAN Z Dual GK110 Graphics Card

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 2, 2014 - 01:29 AM |
Tagged: titan z, nvidia, gpgpu, gk110, dual gpu, asus

NVIDIA unveiled the GeForce GTX TITAN Z at the GPU Technology Conference last month, and the cards will be for sale soon from various partners. ASUS will be one of the first AIB partners to offer a reference TITAN-Z.

The ASUS GTX TITAN Z pairs two full GK110-based GPUs with 12GB of GDDR5 memory. The graphics card houses a total of 5,760 CUDA cores, 480 texture manipulation units (TMUs), and 96 ROPs. Each GK110 GPU interfaces with 6GB of GDDR5 memory via a 384-bit bus. ASUS is using reference clockspeeds with this card, which means 705 MHz base and up to 876 MHz GPU Boost for the GPUs and 7.0 GHz for the memory.

ASUS GTX TITAN Z Dual GPU Graphics Card.jpg

For comparison, the dual-GPU TITAN Z is effectively two GTX TITAN Black cards on a single PCB. However, the TITAN Black runs at 889 MHz base and up to 980 MHz GPU Boost. A hybrid water cooling solution may have allowed NVIDIA to maintain the clockspeed advantage, but doing so would compromise the only advantage the TITAN Z has over using two (much cheaper) TITAN Blacks in a workstation or server: card density. A small hit in clockspeed will be a manageable sacrifice for the target market, I believe.

The ASUS GTX TITAN Z has a 375W TDP and is powered by two 8-pin PCI-E power connectors. The new flagship dual GPU NVIDIA card has an MSRP of $3,000 and should be available in early May.

Source: Asus
Author:
Manufacturer: EVGA

Its been a while...

EVGA has been around for quite some time now.  They have turned into NVIDIA’s closest North American partner after the collapse of the original VisionTek.  At nearly every trade show or gaming event, EVGA is closely associated with whatever NVIDIA presence is there.  In the past EVGA focused primarily on using NVIDIA reference designs for PCB and cooling, and would branch out now and then with custom or semi-custom watercooling solutions.

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A very svelte and minimalist design for the shroud.  I like it.

The last time I actually reviewed an EVGA products was way back in May of 2006.  I took a look at the 7600 GS product, which was a passively cooled card.  Oddly enough, that card is sitting right in front of me as I write this.  Unfortunately, that particular card has a set of blown caps on it and no longer works.  Considering that the card has been in constant use since 2006, I would say that it held up very well for those eight years!

EVGA has been expanding their product lineup to be able to handle the highs and lows of the PC market.  They have started manufacturing motherboards, cases, and power supplies to help differentiate their product lineup and hopefully broaden their product portfolio.  We know from past experiences that companies that rely on one type of product from a single manufacturer (GPUs in this particular case) can experience some real issues if demand drops dramatically due to competitive disadvantages.  EVGA also has taken a much more aggressive approach to differentiating their products while keeping them within a certain budget.

The latest generation of GTX 700 based cards have seen the introduction of the EVGA ACX cooling solutions.  These dual fan coolers are a big step up from the reference design and puts EVGA on par with competitive products from Asus and MSI.  EVGA does make some tradeoffs as compared, but these are fairly minimal when considering the entire package.

Click here to read the entire review!

Author:
Manufacturer: EVGA

EVGA Brings Custom GTX 780 Ti Early

Reference cards for new graphics card releases are very important for a number of reasons.  Most importantly, these are the cards presented to the media and reviewers that judge the value and performance of these cards out of the gate.  These various articles are generally used by readers and enthusiasts to make purchasing decisions, and if first impressions are not good, it can spell trouble.  Also, reference cards tend to be the first cards sold in the market (see the recent Radeon R9 290/290X launch) and early adopters get the same technology in their hands; again the impressions reference cards leave will live in forums for eternity.

All that being said, retail cards are where partners can differentiate and keep the various GPUs relevant for some time to come.  EVGA is probably the most well known NVIDIA partner and is clearly their biggest outlet for sales.  The ACX cooler is one we saw popularized with the first GTX 700-series cards and the company has quickly adopted it to the GTX 780 Ti, released by NVIDIA just last week

evga780tiacx.jpg

I would normally have a full review for you as soon as we could but thanks to a couple of upcoming trips that will keep me away from the GPU test bed, that will take a little while longer.  However, I thought a quick preview was in order to show off the specifications and performance of the EVGA GTX 780 Ti ACX.

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As expected, the EVGA ACX design of the GTX 780 Ti is overclocked.  While the reference card runs at a base clock of 875 MHz and a typical boost clock of 928 MHz, this retail model has a base clock of 1006 MHz and a boost clock of 1072 MHz.  This means that all 2,880 CUDA cores are going to run somewhere around 15% faster on the EVGA ACX model than the reference GTX 780 Ti SKUs. 

We should note that though the cooler is custom built by EVGA, the PCB design of this GTX 780 Ti card remains the same as the reference models. 

Continue reading our preview of the EVGA GeForce GTX 780 Ti ACX custom-cooled graphics card!!

NVIDIA strikes back!

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 8, 2013 - 04:41 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, kepler, gtx 780 ti, gk110, geforce

Here is a roundup of the reviews of what is now the fastest single GPU card on the planet, the GTX 780 Ti, which is a fully active GK110 chip.  The 7GHz GDDR5 is faster than AMD's memory but use a 384-bit memory bus which is less than the R9 290X which leads to some interesting questions about the performance of this card under high resolutions.  Are you willing to pay quite a bit more for better performance and a quieter card? Check out the performance deltas at [H]ard|OCP and see if that changes your mind at all.

You can see how it measures up in ISUs in Ryan's review as well.

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"NVIDIA's fastest single-GPU video card is being launched today. With the full potential of the Kepler architecture and GK110 GPU fully unlocked, how will it perform compared to the new R9 290X with new drivers? Will the price versus performance make sense? Will it out perform a TITAN? We find out all this and more."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP
Author:
Manufacturer: NVIDIA

GK110 in all its glory

I bet you didn't realize that October and November were going to become the onslaught of graphics cards it has been.  I know I did not and I tend to have a better background on these things than most of our readers.  Starting with the release of the AMD Radeon R9 280X, 270X and R7 260X in the first week of October, it has pretty much been a non-stop battle between NVIDIA and AMD for the hearts, minds, and wallets of PC gamers. 

Shortly after the Tahiti refresh came NVIDIA's move into display technology with G-Sync, a variable refresh rate feature that will work with upcoming monitors from ASUS and others as long as you have a GeForce Kepler GPU.  The technology was damned impressive, but I am still waiting for NVIDIA to send over some panels for extended testing. 

Later in October we were hit with the R9 290X, the Hawaii GPU that brought AMD back in the world of ultra-class single GPU card performance.  It has produced stellar benchmarks and undercut the prices (then at least) of the GTX 780 and GTX TITAN.  We tested it in both single and multi-GPU configurations and found that AMD had made some impressive progress in fixing its frame pacing issues, even with Eyefinity and 4K tiled displays. 

NVIDIA dropped a driver release with ShadowPlay that allows gamers to record playback locally without a hit on performance.  I posted a roundup of R9 280X cards which showed alternative coolers and performance ranges.  We investigated the R9 290X Hawaii GPU and the claims that performance is variable and configurable based on fan speeds.  Finally, the R9 290 (non-X model) was released this week to more fanfare than the 290X thanks to its nearly identical performance and $399 price tag. 

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And today, yet another release.  NVIDIA's GeForce GTX 780 Ti takes the performance of the GK110 and fully unlocks it.  The GTX TITAN uses one fewer SMX and the GTX 780 has three fewer SMX units so you can expect the GTX 780 Ti to, at the very least, become the fastest NVIDIA GPU available.  But can it hold its lead over the R9 290X and validate its $699 price tag?

Continue reading our review of the NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 Ti 3GB GK110 Graphics Card!!

Author:
Manufacturer: MSI

A New TriFrozr Cooler

Graphics cards are by far the most interesting topic we cover at PC Perspective.  Between the battles of NVIDIA and AMD as well as the competition between board partners like EVGA, ASUS, MSI and Galaxy, there is very rarely a moment in time when we don't have a different GPU product of some kind on an active test bed.  Both NVIDIA and AMD release reference cards (for the most part) with each and every new product launch and it then takes some time for board partners to really put their own stamp on the designs.  Other than the figurative stamp that is the sticker on the fan.

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One of the companies that has recently become well known for very custom, non-reference graphics card designs is MSI and the pinnacle of the company's engineering falls into the Lightning brand.  As far back as the MSI GTX 260 Lightning and as recently as the MSI HD 7970 Lightning, these cards have combined unique cooling, custom power design and good amount of over engineering to really produce a card that has few rivals.

Today we are looking at the brand new MSI GeForce GTX 780 Lightning, a complete revamp of the GTX 780 that was released in May.  Based on the same GK110 GPU as the GTX Titan card, with two fewer SMX units, the GTX 780 easily the second fastest single GPU card on the market.  MSI is hoping to make the enthusiasts even more excited about the card with the Lightning design that brings a brand new TriFrozr cooler, impressive power design and overclocking capabilities that basic users and LN2 junkies can take advantage of.  Just what DO you get for $750 these days?

Continue reading our review of the MSI GeForce GTX 780 Lightning graphics card!!

Author:
Subject: Systems
Manufacturer: Digital Storm

Haswell and Kepler

With the release of Intel's Haswell core processors and the updated graphics card lineup from NVIDIA, Digital Storm has updated many of their custom PC lines to include both.  A little while ago the company sent along a pre-built Ode system that includes some impressive hardware like an overclocked Core i7-4770K and a GTX 780 along with a Corsair SSD and more.  Even though the design is using fully off-the-shelf parts, the build quality is impressive and will interest many users that want the jump start of a ready made rig.

Our article today (and embedded video) will give you a quick overview of the hardware, the build and the performance that you can expect for this $2500 PC.

  • Digital Storm Ode Custom
  • Intel Core i7-4770K (OC to 4.4 GHz)
  • ASUS Z87-C Motherboard
  • Corsair H100 Water Cooler
  • 16GB (2 x 8GB) Kingston HyperX DDR3-1866
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Graphics Card
  • 120GB Corsair Neutron SSD
  • 1TB Western Digital 7200 RPM HDD
  • Corsair HX1050 Power Supply
  • Corsair Graphite 600T White Case

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Current pricing on this build is $2577 from Digital Storm's website and while that is definitely higher than buying the same components out right, the difference shouldn't be enough to scare you off.  More on that later.

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The Ode from Digital Storm is built around the Corsair 600T chassis, an older design that still stands up well in terms of looks and performance.  The only draw back to it is that it does not have an internal USB 3.0 header and thus still uses the external cable to plug into the back of the motherboard.  If you want to see video from 2010 we did of this case, check the way back machine to do so!

A white color scheme really makes this system stand out and the window on the side panel will let everyone gawk at the components included inside.  With plenty of room for fans, radiators and good intake filter support throughout, the 600T remains one of our favorite chassis at PC Perspective.

Continue reading our review of the Digital Storm Ode Custom Gaming PC!!

Galaxy GeForce GTX 780 HOF Hall of Fame brings back the white PCB

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 8, 2013 - 04:44 PM |
Tagged: galaxy, gtx 780, gk110, hall of fame

I remember the first time I saw a white PCB - it was on a Soyo motherboard built on a chipset that very few people reading this post today will remember.  Our friends at Galaxy just sent over word that its new GeForce GTX 780 3GB HOF (Hall of Fame) Edition card was now shipping and available at Amazon.com and TigerDirect.com sporting a fantastic looking white PCB!

hof1.jpg

As you probably know the GeForce GTX 780 is based on the same GK110 GPU as the GTX TITAN with fewer CUDA cores enabled and with a 3GB frame buffer it is definitely a step above other single-GPU offerings available (except the TITAN obviously).  Even better, the HOF Edition from Galaxy is overclocked to a base clock of 1006 MHz compared to the reference speed of 863 MHz!!  Galaxy claims this is the highest clocked air-cooled GTX 780 in the world!

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You can learn more about the Galaxy GTX 780 HOF Edition over at its website or by heading over to Amazon.com and TigerDirect.com.

Source: Galaxy

NVIDIA Launches Flagship Quadro K6000 Graphics Card For Visual Computing Professionals

Subject: Graphics Cards | July 23, 2013 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: workstation, simulation, quadro k6000, quadro, nvidia, k6000, gk110

Today, NVIDIA announced its flagship Quadro graphics card called the K6000. Back in March of this year, NVIDIA launched a new like of Quadro graphics cards for workstations. Those cards replaced the Fermi-based predecessors with new models based on NVIDIA’s GK-104 “Kepler” GPUs. Notably missing from that new lineup was NVIDIA Quadro K6000, which is the successor to the Quadro 6000.

NVIDIA Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU.jpg

Contrary to previous rumors, the Quadro K6000 will be based on the full GK110 chip. In fact, it will be the fastest single-GPU graphics card that NVIDIA has to offer.

The Quadro K6000 features a full GK110 GPU, 12GB of GDDR5 memory on a 384-bit bus, and a 225W TDP. The full GK110-based GPU has 2,880 CUDA cores, 256 TMUs, and 48 ROPs. Unfortunately, NVIDIA has not yet revealed clockspeeds for the GPU or memory.

NVIDIA Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU Specifications Comparison.jpg

Thanks to the GPU not having any SMX units disabled, the NVIDIA Quadro K6000 is rated for approximately 1.4 TFLOPS of peak double precision floating point performance of and 5.2 TFLOPS of single precision floating point performance.

The chart below illustrates the differences between the new flagship Quadro K6000 with full GK110 GPU and the highest tier Tesla and consumer graphics cards which have at least one SMX unit disabled.

NVIDIA GK110-Based Graphics Cards

  Quadro K6000 Tesla K20X GTX TITAN
CUDA 2,880 2,688 2,688
TMUs 256 224 224
ROPs 48 48 48
Memory 12GB 6GB 6GB
Memory Bus 384-bit 384-bit 384-bit
Memory Bandwidth 288 GB/s 250 GB/s 288 GB/s
Single Precision FP 5.2 TFLOPS 3.95 TFLOPS 4.5 TFLOPS
Double Precision FP ~1.4 TFLOPS 1.31 TFLOPS 1.31 TFLOPS

The NVIDIA GTX TITAN gaming graphics card has 2,688 CUDA cores, 224 TMUs, and 48 ROPs and is rated for peak double and single precision of 1.31 TFLOPS and 4.5 TFLOPS respectively. On the other hand, the lower-clocked Tesla K20X compute accelerator card has 2,688 CUDA cores, 224 TMUs, and 48 ROPs along with lower clockspeeds on the memory and GPU. Because of the lower clockspeeds, the K20X is rated for double and single precision floating point performance of 1.31 TFLOPS and 3.95 TFLOPS and memory bandwidth of 250GB/s versus the 288GB/s bandwidth on the TITAN and K6000.

NVIDIA_Quadro_K6000_workstation_graphics_card_gk110.jpg

NVIDIA® Quadro® K6000 GPU

In all, the new K6000 is an impressive card for professional users, and the GK110 chip should perform well in the workstation environment where GK104 was the only option before. NVIDIA claims that the GK110 is up to 3-times the performance of the Quadro 6000 (non K) predecessor. It is also the first Quadro GPU with 12GB of GDDR5 memory, which should lend itself well to high resolutions and artists working with highly detailed models and simulations.

NVIDIA Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU With 12GB GDDR5.jpg

Specifically, NVIDIA is aiming this graphics card at the visual computing market, which includes 3D designers, visual effects artists, 3d animation, and simulations. The company provided several examples in the press release, including using the GK110-based card to render nearly complete photorealistic vehicle models in RTT Deltagen that can run real time during design reviews.

NVIDIA Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU Used To Created Photorealistic Vehicle Models In Real Time.jpg

The Quadro K6000 allows for larger and fully populated virtual sets with realistic lighting and scene detail when 3D animators and VFX artists are working with models and movie scenes in real time. Simulation work also takes advantage of the beefy double precision horsepower to support up to 3-times faster simulation run times in Terraspark's InsightEarth simulation. Users can run simulations with wider areas in less time than the previous generation Quardo cards, and is being used by oil companies to determine the best places to drill.

NVIDIA Quadro K6000 GK110 GPU Content Creation.jpg

Pixar's Vice President of Software and R&D Guido Quaroni had the following to say regarding the K6000.

"The Kepler features are key to our next generation of real-time lighting and geometry 
handling. The added memory and other features allow our artists to see much more of the 
final scene in a real-time, interactive form, which allows many more artistic iterations."

The K6000 is the final piece to the traditional NVIDIA Quadro lineup and is likely to be well recieved by workstation users that need the increased double precision performance that GK110 offers over the existing GK104 chips. Specific pricing and availability are still unknown, but the K6000 will be available from workstation providers, system integrators, and authorized distribution partners beginning this fall.

Source: NVIDIA

Gainward GTX 780 Phantom GLH Features Massive HSF and Factory Overclock

Subject: Graphics Cards | June 24, 2013 - 03:28 PM |
Tagged: phantom glh, gtx 780, gk110, gaming, gainward

The rumored GTX 760 graphics cards are still not available, but graphics enthusiasts do have a number of new factory overclocked GTX 780 cards with custom coolers to drool over. One such new GTX 780 card is the so-called GTX 780 Phantom GLH card from Gainward. This card is 2.5 slot monster that pairs the GTX 780 GPU with custom power phases and a giant block of aluminum and copper to support a healthy factory overclock.

Gainward GTX 780 Phantom GLH Graphics Card.jpg

This new Gainward Phanton GLH card pushes the GTX 780 GPU farther than the company's own GTX 780 Phantom. It has a base clock of 980MHz, boost clock of 1033 MHz, and slightly overclocked 6200 MHz memory. Of course, being based on NVIDIA's GTX 780 chip, the Phanton GLH features 2,304 CUDA cores and 192 Texture Units within 12 SMX units. The Phantom GLH's 3GB of overclocked GDDR5 memory affords the card 297.6 GB/s of memory bandwidth. Gainward claims that the new card is up to 19% faster than NVIDIA's reference GTX 780 graphics card.

To put that in perspective, the Gainward GTX 780 Phantom (non-GLH) is clocked at 902 MHz base and 954 MHz boost. Further, NVIDIA"s stock GTX 780 is has GPU clockspeeds of 863 MHz base, 900 MHz boost, and 6008 MHz for the memory. In other words, it is an impressive factory overclock, and I'm interested to see how much headroom is left for enthusiasts to push the chip further with the included cooler.

Gainward GTX 780 Phantom GLH with Box.jpg

Other features of the upcoming Gainward GTX 780 Phanton GLH include an 8-phase PWM with DrMOS technology, a large aluminum fin stack with removable fans that is connected to a copper GPU block via five 8mm heatpipes, and an EXPERTmode option in the company's overclocking utility. Video outputs are the same as the reference design, with two DVI, one DisplayPort, and one HDMI port.

There is no word on pricing or when (and where) it will be available, but expect this beastly card to come at a premium. Although, as one of the fastest factory overclocked GTX 780 cards (soon to be) available, it may be worth it!

Also read: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 780 3GB Graphics Card Review - GK110 Mini

Source: Gainward