G-Cube Big Red Wireless Gesture Mouse

Subject: Graphics Cards | May 28, 2012 - 06:08 PM |
Tagged: input, wireless mouse, gestures, G-Cube, V-Track 310

The G-Cube V-Track 310 will get you noticed, not just because of the brilliant red colour of the body but also because the mouse can handle gesture input.  Some of its features seem more at home on a gaming mouse, with five DPI settings from 800 to 2000 as well as a modifiable report rate make this more than just a mobile mouse.  That is not to imply G-Cube skimped on the wireless connectivity, the transmitter is good up to 30' so even in a large room this would function perfectly with an HTPC.  Benchmark Reviews had mixed results from the gestures, some functions worked, some didn't and some just seemed useless but overall they rated it highly for someone who wants more options from a wireless mouse.

BMR G-Cube-V-Track-310-Wireless-Mouse0038FPlarge.jpg

"Wireless mice are also becoming the de facto standard along with macro software that further enhances productivity, while at the same time, decreasing repetitive clicking. In the continuing spirit of bringing you the latest and sometimes the greatest, Benchmark Reviews will analyze the new G-Cube V-Track 310 2.4Hz Wireless Mouse. The G-Cube V-Track 310 boasts sixteen macro "Gestures" for the right button, with a multitude of actions per gesture, two options for vertical and horizontal scrolling, four DPI settings, three report rates, and it's wireless. It also comes in four colors, Red, Blue, Green, and Black. "

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Microsoft Releasing Kinect for Windows And SDK On February 1st, 2012

Subject: General Tech | January 12, 2012 - 11:18 AM |
Tagged: xbox, windows, voice, software, PC, microsoft, kinect, gestures

Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer announced at the Consumer Electronics Show that on February 1st, the new Kinect sensor for Windows would become available for purchase. In addition to the new Kinect for Windows sensor hardware, Microsoft is releasing an official SDk or Software Development Kit. Having the SDK installed on a Windows operating system will be required in order to use Kinect software applications. Currently, there are no (Microsoft official) consumer applications using Kinect; however, official hardware and an official SDK will surely spur software development.

Kinect_for_Windows.jpg

Microsoft is confident that the launch of the SDK and specially tuned hardware will spur development of software. According to MSNBC, the company is working with over 200 companies to develop software applications for Windows using Kinect. Microsoft's partners include Toyota, Mattel, American Express, and United Health Group. These corporate partners seem to indicate that initial Kinect applications will be designed for consumers to use in a business setting, say on a sales floor of car dealerships, at hospitals, or point of sale devices (maybe American Express is planning a "card swipe" application where holding the card up to the Kinect can be used to purchase items. Software for consumers to use at home is also likely in the pipeline and users will see them in the future.

Due to the Microsoft Kinect for Windows sensor not being subsidized by Xbox 360 games and accessories, the PC version is $100 more than the Xbox 360 version, and will retail for $250 USD. Amazon currently has the device (for pre-order) here for a whole penny less at $249.99.

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer.

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Source: MSNBC

It's not a gaming mouse, the Microsoft Touch Mouse works for a living

Subject: General Tech | August 30, 2011 - 04:51 PM |
Tagged: input, mouse, gestures

With so many companies focusing on gaming peripherals, the mouse you use at your day job really hasn't changed very much.  You can see the design is very plain but that has the added benefit of making the mouse equally comfortable for lefties and righties.  It is wireless, using two AA batteries to power it and it is able to transmit up to 10' away from the receiver and work on most surfaces.  TechReviewSource mention several of the gestures that will work with the mouse, from minimizing and maximizing to acting as an alternative to ALT-TAB.  If you are looking to give your desk at work something special, check out the review here.

MS_touchmouse.jpg

"The Microsoft Touch Mouse combines a traditional mouse with multitouch gestures to make navigating and using Windows 7 on a desktop computer just like a notebook with a touchpad. While a little expensive, it is very responsive, comfortable to use and intuitive."

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