Podcast #360 - Intel XPoint Memory, Windows 10 and DX12, FreeSync displays and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2015 - 02:45 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, Intel, XPoint, nand, DRAM, windows 10, DirectX 12, freesync, g-sync, amd, nvidia, benq, uhd420, wasabi mango, X99, giveaway

PC Perspective Podcast #360 - 07/30/2015

Join us this week as we discuss Intel XPoint Memory, Windows 10 and DX12, FreeSync displays and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Sebastian Peak

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

 

Author:
Manufacturer: Wasabi Mango

Overview

A few years ago, we took our first look at the inexpensive 27" 1440p monitors which were starting to flood the market via eBay sellers located in Korea. These monitors proved to be immensely popular and largely credited for moving a large number of gamers past 1080p.

However, in the past few months we have seen a new trend from some of these same Korean monitor manufacturers. Just like the Seiki Pro SM40UNP 40" 4K display that we took a look at a few weeks ago, the new trend is large 4K monitors.

Built around a 42-in LG AH-IPS panel, the Wasabi Mango UHD420 is an impressive display. Inclusion of HDMI 2.0 and DisplayPort 1.2 allow you to achieve 4K at a full 60Hz and 4:4:4 color gamut. At a cost of just under $800 on Amazon, this is an incredibly appealing value.

IMG_2939.JPG

Whether or not the UHD420 is a TV or a monitor is actually quite the tossup. The lack of a tuner
might initially lead you to believe it's not a TV. Inclusion of a DisplayPort connector, and USB 3.0 hub might make you believe it's a monitor, but it's bundled with a remote control (entirely in Korean). In reality, this display could really be used for either use case (unless you use OTA tuning), and really starts to blur the lines between a "dumb" TV and a monitor. You'll also find VESA 400x400mm mounting holes on this display for easy wall mounting.

Continue reading our overview of the Wasabi Mango UHD420 4K HDMI 2.0 FreeSync Display!!

Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: BenQ

Overdrive initialized

We have been tracking the differences between AMD’s FreeSync and Nvidia’s G-Sync for some time now. The launch of FreeSync-capable displays started out a bit shaky, as some features we took for granted went missing. The first round of FreeSync displays we reviewed came with non-functional overdrive when the display / GPU pipeline was operating in FreeSync mode.

ghost1.jpg

Comparison of overdrive response in first round FreeSync displays. Images should look like the ROG Swift (left), which was correctly applying overdrive.

While AMD apparently fixed a portion of this problem in a subsequent driver update, getting overdrive to function in these early displays would require a firmware update. Unlike what you may be used to with a motherboard or SSD firmware, displays are not typically end-user upgradeable. This meant that even if manufacturers produced a fix, owners would have to send in their display to be updated (and be without it for several weeks).

The only manufacturer to step forward and retroactively support overdrive in their first gen FreeSync panel was BenQ. In a statement issued via TFTCentral:

BenQ have confirmed that the FreeSync/AMA issue which affected their XL2730Z display has now been fixed. This issue caused the overdrive (AMA) feature to not function when the screen was connected to a FreeSync capable system. As a result, users could not make use of the AMA feature and benefit from the improved response times that the 'normal' AMA mode offered, as compared with AMA Off. See our review for more information.

A driver update from AMD is already available and should be downloaded from their website. In addition BenQ will be releasing a firmware update for the monitor itself to fix this issue. Current stocks in distribution are being recalled and updated with retailers so future purchases should already carry this new firmware. This is expected to apply for stock purchased AFTER 1st July, as V002 firmware screens should be shipped by BenQ to distributors in late June.

For those who already have an XL2730Z if you want to, you can return it to BenQ for them to carry out the firmware update for you. This only applies if the user is experiencing issues with the performance of the screen. There is no simple way for the end user to update the firmware themselves and it is not encouraged. Users should contact BenQ support through their relevant country website for more information on how to return their screen for the update.

The catch with the above is that the statement came from BenQ PR for Europe, and we nor TFTCentral have been able to confirm any equivalent upgrade process in place for the USA. We did note in various online reviews that those receiving their BenQ XL2730Z in the last week of June confirmed having the new V002 firmware.

If you have one of these panels, verifying your firmware is simple. Hold down the menu button while powering up the display (you will have to hold the power button for a few seconds before you hear a beep).

service-menu.jpg

The display will power up and appear as normal, except that now pressing the menu button again will bring up the above service menu. Those with the update will have “V002” as the starting text of the ‘F/W Version’ result.

ASUS-overdrive.jpg

Overdrive functioning on the ASUS MG279Q IPS FreeSync display, showing an odd simultaneous ‘negative ghost’ outline of a slightly ghosted image.

We have been eager to retest the BenQ since hearing of this updated firmware revision. While we have seen overdrive functioning in the recent ASUS MG279Q, it was not a perfect implementation, and we were curious to know if BenQ’s implementation fared any better.

BenQ.jpg

Continue reading for the results of our testing!

Podcast #356 - Fury X Pump Whine, ASUS MG279Q FreeSync Monitor, GTX 980 Ti STRIX and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 2, 2015 - 02:39 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, fury x, pump whine, asus, mg279q, freesync, strix 980ti, gtx 980ti, seasonic, snow silent, zotac, zbox

PC Perspective Podcast #356 - 07/02/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the Fury X Pump Whine, ASUS MG279Q FreeSync Monitor, GTX 980 Ti STRIX and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: ASUS

Introduction, Specifications, and Packaging

AMD fans have been patiently waiting for a proper FreeSync display to be released. The first round of displays using the Adaptive Sync variable refresh rate technology arrived with an ineffective or otherwise disabled overdrive feature, resulting in less than optimal pixel response times and overall visual quality, especially when operating in variable refresh rate modes. Meanwhile G-Sync users had overdrive functionality properly functioning , as well as a recently introduced 1440P IPS panel from Acer. The FreeSync camp was overdue for an IPS 1440P display superior to that first round of releases, hopefully with those overdrive issues corrected. Well it appears that ASUS, the makers of the ROG Swift, have just rectified that situation with a panel we can finally recommend to AMD users:

DSC02594.jpg

Before we get into the full review, here is a sampling of our recent display reviews from both sides of the camp:

  • ASUS PG278Q 27in TN 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270H 27in TN 1080P 144Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB280HK 28in TN 4K 60Hz G-Sync
  • Acer XB270HU 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz G-Sync
  • LG 34UM67 34in IPS 25x18 21:9 48-75Hz FreeSync
  • BenQ XL2730Z 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • Acer XG270HU 27in TN 1440P 40-144Hz FreeSync
  • ASUS MG279Q 27in IPS 1440P 144Hz FreeSync(35-90Hz) < You are here

The reason for there being no minimum rating on the G-Sync panels above is explained in our article 'Dissecting G-Sync and FreeSync - How the Technologies Differ', though the short version is that G-Sync can effectively remain in VRR down to <1 FPS regardless of the hardware minimum of the display panel itself.

Continue reading as we will look at this new ASUS MG279Q 27" 144Hz 1440P IPS FreeSync display!

LG Announces 27MU67-B Monitor: 27-in 4K IPS with AMD FreeSync

Subject: Displays | June 9, 2015 - 01:51 AM |
Tagged: UHD, LG, ips monitor, gaming monitor, freesync, amd, 4k, 27MU67-B

LG announced a new 4K monitor today, and since it's from LG you know there has to be an IPS panel inside.

4k-mu67.jpg

The 27MU67-B boasts a 3840x2160 UHD/4K IPS panel and supports AMD FreeSync variable refresh rate technology, though the panel appears to only support up to 60 Hz according to the official specs. Speaking of, here's the full rundown:

Panel

  • Panel Type: IPS
  • Color Gamut (CIE1931): SRGB 99%
  • Aspect Ratio: 16:9
  • Resolution: 3840x2160
  • Brightness (cd/m2): 300 cd/m2
  • Contrast Ratio: 5M:1
  • Response Time (GTG): 5ms
  • Refresh Rate: 60 Hz: 178 / 178
  • Viewing Angle: Hard Coating (3H), anti-glare

Inputs/Outputs

  • DVI-D x1
  • HDMI x2
  • Display Port x1

Special Features

  • Black Stabilizer: Black Equalizer
  • DAS Mode: Yes
  • Reader Mode: Yes
  • PC: Yes
  • DDC/CI: Yes
  • HDCP: Yes (2.2)
  • FreeSync: Yes (w/ DP, mDP)
  • Factory Calibration: Yes
  • Super+ Resolution: Yes
  • Screen-split: Yes (Software)
  • Flicker Safe: Yes
  • Pivot: Yes
  • Dual Controller: Yes (Software)

large01-.jpg

The 27MU67-B also features factory calibration and 99% sRGB color the display could be used for more critical work (yes, gaming can be categorized as "critical").

The LG 27MU67-B has an MSRP of $599.99 and availability is listed as “coming soon”.

Source: LG

LG 27MU67: 27-inch, 4K, IPS, FreeSync Monitor

Subject: Displays | May 29, 2015 - 04:59 PM |
Tagged: LG, ips, freesync, 4k

LG Australia published a product page for their LG 27MU67 monitor, which the rest of the company doesn't seem to acknowledge the existence of. It is still online, even after three days worth of time that someone could have used to pull the plug. This one is interesting for a variety of reasons: it's 4K, it's IPS, and it supports AMD FreeSync. It is also relatively cheap for that combination, being listed at $799 AUD RRP.

lg-2015-freesync4kips-27mu67.jpg

Some websites have converted that to ~$610 to $620 USD, but it might even be less than that. Australian prices are often listed with their federal tax rolled in, which would yield a price that is inflated about 10%. It is possible, though maybe wishful thinking, that this monitor could retail in the ~$500 to $550 price range for the United States (if it even comes to North America). Again, this is a 4K, IPS, FreeSync panel.

Very little is posted on LG's website and thus it is hard to tell how good of an IPS panel this is. It is listed as 99% SRGB coverage, which is good for typical video but not the best if you are working on printed content, such as magazine illustrations. On the other hand, this is a gaming panel, not a professional one. Update (May 29, 2015): It also has 10-bit (per channel) color. It sounds like it is true 10-bit, not just a look-up table, but I should note that it doesn't explicitly say that.

Again, pricing and availability is up in the air, because this is not an official announcement. It is listed to launch in Australia for $799 AUD, though.

Source: LG Australia

Stop by for the BenQ XL2730Z FreeSync display, stay for the conversations

Subject: Displays | May 21, 2015 - 01:44 PM |
Tagged: XL2730Z, freesync, benq, amd

Ryan wasn't the only one to test BenQ's XL2730Z 27-in 2560x1440 144 Hz FreeSync Monitor, The Tech Report also had a chance to test one, as well as talk to NVIDIA's Tom Petersen about their competing technology.  They also had a chance to discuss FreeSync in general with AMD's David Glen who is one of the engineers behind FreeSync.  Their benchmarks and overall impression of the displays capabilities and FreeSync in general are a major portion of the review but the discussion with the two company representatives makes for even more interesting reading.

img.x.jpg

"AMD's FreeSync is here, personified in BenQ's XL2730Z monitor. We've gone deep into the display's performance and smoothness, with direct comparisons to G-Sync using 240-fps video. Here's what we found."

Here are some more Display articles from around the web:

Displays

Podcast #348 - DirectX 12, New AMD GPU News, Giveaways and more!

Subject: General Tech | May 7, 2015 - 03:17 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, amd, Fiji, hbm, microsoft, build 2015, DirectX 12, Intel, SSD 750, freesync, gsync, Oculus, rift

PC Perspective Podcast #348 - 05/07/2015

Join us this week as we discuss DirectX 12, New AMD GPU News, Giveaways and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

ASUS MG279Q 144 Hz Display Caps at 90 Hz with FreeSync

Subject: Displays | May 1, 2015 - 04:27 PM |
Tagged: amd, freesync, asus, mg279q

Early in April ASUS and AMD announced that the MG279Q display, first shown at CES in January, would be brought into the world of FreeSync and officially adopt AMD's branding. The original post from the AMD Twitter account clearly mentions the display would support 144 Hz refresh rates, an increase from the 120 Hz that ASUS claimed during CES.

amdfs-mg279q.jpg

Now however, we have some complications to deal with. According to a FAQ posted on the ASUS.com website, FreeSync variable refresh rates will only be supported in a range of 35 - 90 Hz.

Enable FreeSync™ in the MG279’s OSD setting, choose PC’s refresh rate timing between 35-90Hz (DP/miniDP only)

On the positive, that 35 Hz lower limit would be the best we have seen on any FreeSync monitor to date. And while the 90 Hz upper limit isn't awful (considering we have seen both 75 Hz and 144 Hz limits on current monitors), it does the beg the question as to why it would be LOWER than the 144 Hz quoted maximum overall refresh rate of the display.

The ASUS MG279Q is an IPS-style display so the quality of the screen should be top notch, but that doesn't alone answer why the upper FreeSync limit and upper refresh rate would not match. We already have the Acer Predator XB270HU G-Sync display in-house that operates at a variable refresh rate as high as 144 Hz with a similar quality IPS display. I've inquired to both AMD and ASUS about the reasoning for this 90 Hz limit, and we'll see if either side cares to comment prior to the display's release.

Source: ASUS