Antec Announces P9 Window Full-Tower Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 2, 2016 - 09:00 AM |
Tagged: side window, P9 Window, mid-tower, Full-Tower, fan controller, enclosure, case, atx case, antec

Antec has listed a new P9 Window tower enclosure on their site ahead of Computex, and while it's listed as "not available" at the moment, that should change by the end of the month.

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So what is this P9 Window? It's a straightforward case with a big side window, excellent storage and cooling support, and dual onboard fan controllers.

"Don’t let the sleek, understated exterior fool you. The P9 Window is loaded with builder-focused features that deliver performance, Quiet Computing, and future-proof expandability right out of the box. The interior volume, the variety of cooling options, and the modular HDD cages are just a few of the features that make the P9 Window stand out in the Performance One series."

p9-window-2.jpg

Specifications:

  • Motherboard Support: ATX, micro ATX, mini ITX
  • Expansion Slots: 8
  • 13 Total Drive Bays:
    • 3 x Tool-less 5.25” ODD Bays
    • 8 x Tool-less 3.5” HDD trays (each compatible with 2.5” SSD)
    • 1 x 3.5” HDD (inside the 5.25” drive cage)
    • 2 x Tool-less 2.5” Dedicated SSD Bays
  • Cooling System:
    • 2 x Front 120mm (included) fan
    • 1 x Rear 120mm (included) fan
    • 3 x Top 120mm or 2 x 140mm fan mounts (optional)
    • 1 x Bottom 120mm (optional)
    • 2 x 120mm HDD cage fan mounts (Optional)
  • Water cooling support:
    • Front: Supports 240mm radiator
    • Top: Supports240/280/360 mm radiator
    • Pump / Reservoir mounting brackets included
    • Removable / Relocation of HDD cages for water cooling pump
  • I/O Ports:
    • 2 x USB 3.0
    • 2 x USB 2.0
    • 2 x Fan controls
    • Audio In/Out
  • Washable air filters (front intake and PSU)
  • Supports up to 430 mm VGA cards
  • Bottom mounted ATX PSU (not included)
  • Dimensions: 22.44” (W) x 23.50 (H) x 11.26” (D)
  • Weight: 20 lbs

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Pricing shown in Antec's listing is a reasonable $109 for a full-tower design like this, and we'll doubtless get a chance to see how its performing soon enough as reviews start coming out.

Source: ComputerBase
Manufacturer: Reeven

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of Reeven

The Reeven Four-Eyes Touch Fan Controller is a new revision of their existing four-channel controller, integrating a touch-based interface into the design. The Four-Eyes controller is housed in a metal enclosure that fits into a single 5.25" drive bay. With an MSRP of $49, the Four-Eyes Touch Fan Controller makes a good match for any enthusiast build.

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Courtesy of Reeven

The Four-Eyes Touch has a front screen divided into seven distinct sections, all touch capable. The upper four sections are tied to individual fan channels each supporting up to a 2.5A fan with total power provided of up to 30 watts. The lower right section controls the unit warning sound and display temperature with the lower left used to set the display to one of seven colors. The lower middle section is used to set the fan speed, you simply swipe your finger across the section to increase or decrease the active channel's fan speed.

Technical Specifications (taken from the Thermaltake website)

Model Number RFC-03
Dimensions (W)148 x (H)42 x (D)100mm
DC Input DC5V & DC12V
DC Output 3.7V ~ 12V (±10%)
Output Ampere 2.5A per Channel
Temperature Range 0 ~ 99C
Fan Speed Range 0 ~ 9990rpm
Weight 200g

Continue reading our review of the Reeven Four-Eyes Touch Fan Controller!

Thermaltake Launches New Fan Controller With Touchscreen

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 20, 2015 - 11:50 PM |
Tagged: touchscreen, thermaltake, fan controller, bling, 5.25-inch bay

Looking to ditch that DVD drive that hasn't powered up in three years for something with a bit more bling? Thermaltake is hoping that you will look no further than their new Commander FT fan controller. Slotting into a 5.25-inch drive bay, the Commander FT is dominated by a large 5.5-inch touchscreen display and allows you to control up to five case fans.

Thermaltake Commander FT Touch Installed In Mid-Tower PC Case.jpg

The Commander FT is a five channel, 50W design (10W per channel) design powered by a single Molex connector. Fan support includes 3-pin or 4-pin (PWM) fans. The touch panel is laid out with large on screen buttons. The capacitive screen shows temperature and fan RPM speeds and allows users to engage automatic or manual control modes. Thermaltake includes two automatic presets called performance and silent which perform how one would expect – the performance mode ramps all connected fans to their highest speeds while the silent mode keeps fans spinning as slowly as possible while keeping the case temperature in check. When it comes to manual mode, users can choose individual fan channels and adjust their speeds using an on-screen slider.

Although it is not the most powerful fan controller (only 10W/channel) on the market, it sure looks sharp. If you are looking for a high end fan controller, the Commander FT will be available soon for $37 from online retailers (such as Newegg). 

Source: Thermaltake

NZXT Launches $30 Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller

Subject: General Tech | May 10, 2013 - 07:37 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, sentry, sentry mix 2, fan controller

NZXT has launched its new Sentry Mix 2 fan controller. Featuring an audio equipment theme, the Sentry Mix 2 fits into a single 5.25” bay. It features a matte black bezel with six glossy black sliders that are recessed into the bezel to ensure compatibility with PC case doors. Below the fan speed sliders are LEDs that can be changed to one of five colors (white, blue, green, orange, red).

NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller.jpg

The Mix 2 is the successor and replacement of the original Mix fan controller, and it uses a redesigned PCB. The controller has six sliders that are connected to six 4-pin fan outputs. The fan controller is powered by two 4-pin Molex power connectors and can draw a maximum of 180W. Each fan channel can draw a maximum of 30W. The sliders are analog rheostats that are also compatible with PWM controlled fans.

NZXT Sentry Mix 2 Fan Controller (2).jpg

The Sentry Mix 2 comes with a 2 year warranty. The fan controller should be available soon with an MSRP of $29.99. More information can be found on NZXT’s website. As far as fan controllers go, I could see myself using this one as it keeps the LED bling to a minimum.

Source: NZXT

NZXT's New "Grid" Hub Can Consolidate Up To 10 Case Fans

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 19, 2013 - 08:46 AM |
Tagged: nzxt, case fan, fan controller, fan hub, cooling, grid

NZXT has announced that it is making its Grid fan hub available to the masses. No longer only available with certain NZXT cases, the Grid fan hub takes a single Molex power cable and provides 3-pin power outputs for up to ten fans.

The NZXT kit will come with the Grid hub, a 200mm long Molex power adapter, a single 200mm long (3-pin) female-to-female adapter cable, and two 200mm (3-pin) fan extension cables. NZXT is also including five black cable ties to assist with cable management.

NZXT Grid Fan Hub For Up to 10 Case Fans.jpg

Unfortunately, the Grid does not provide functionality to allow adjustable fan speeds. All fans connected to the Grid hub will run at 100% unless other means (such as resistors) are used inline to slow them down. If you only care for speed, and are in a situation where your motherboard does not support enough fan headers but you cannot justify a full fan controller the Grid might be for you. For the price, it is serviceable in that regard.

Speaking of pricing, the Grid fan hub will be available soon with a MSRP of $11.99. More information is available on NZXT's product page.

Is the Grid something that you could see yourself using?

Source: NZXT

Manage your fan speed from in front of your PC or half way across the world

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 19, 2012 - 06:22 PM |
Tagged: bitfenix, Hydra Pro, Recon, fan controller

One of the best ways to bring down the noise your system generates without switching to alternate cooling methods is to install a fan controller in your system so that you can control the speed your fans run at and slow them when you don't need the extra cooling.  Hardware Canucks finished a video review of two fan controllers from BitFenix, the basic five channel Hydra Pro and the Internet enabled, touch screen Recon which offers far more control than the analog Hydra Pro.  Neither controller costs more than $50, check out the review and see which would fit your system best.

HWC_RECON-HYDRA-1.jpg

"Fan controllers may not be a marquee item within many enthusiasts’ systems but the power they grant over airflow within a case cannot be underestimated. BitFenix's Hydra Pro and Recon controllers hail from very different ends of the spectrum but they both grant end users complete control over their system fans."

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Who needs software control when you can roll your own fan controller?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2011 - 05:56 PM |
Tagged: fan controller, pwm, DIY

Even with the fancy drivers now that allow you to set a minimum fan speed you will find that it is almost impossible to completely turn the fan off.  If you desire to do so, it is almost impossible to turn the fan completely off, which is something that is almost impossible with either a software solution or with a PWM controller.  Over at Hack a Day you can find instructions on how to create a breadboard project which translates PWM signal to DC and will allow you much greater control over your fan speed.

pwm_to_dc_fan_control.jpg

"[hedgehoginventions] wrote in to share a little modification he made to his video card in order to keep it from overheating during strenuous 3D tasks. Having swapped out the stock cooler on his Nvidia 9600GT graphics card, he found that it did not need to utilize the fan while doing mundane things like checking email, but that it still required extra air flow while playing games.

He figured he get the fan to shut off by tweaking the PWM signal, but he found that he could not get the duty cycle under 20% using software, which still caused the fan to run at all times. The circuit he built takes the PWM signal output by the card, cleaning it up before converting it to a corresponding DC voltage. The fan then runs at the same speed it would if driven directly by the PWM signal, though it can now turn off completely when not required."

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Source: Hack a Day