Lian Li Announces X510 Aluminum Full-Tower Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 17, 2015 - 07:00 AM |
Tagged: Lian Li, full tower, enclosure, cases, aluminum case

Looking for a super deluxe way to hold just about any size rig? Lian Li has a sophisticated looking option with the new X510 full-tower enclosure.


An all-aluminum case (of course - it's Lian Li!) with a no-nonsense design aesthetic and very roomy interior, the X510 still keeps a fairly trim profile thanks to the omission of 5.25-inch drive bays.

Here are some of the key features from Lian Li:

  • Isolated air chambers for efficient cooling
  • Fits huge components – 330mm VGA Card, 180mm CPU cooler, 245mm PSU length
  • Eight expansion slots
  • Support for eight total drives
  • Tempered glass window for showing off hardware
  • Included fan speed controller


The glass side window and included fan controller are nice touches, and while the X510 carries a steep MSRP it doesn't seem out of place for an all-alumimum case like this (depending on performance). So what is pricing/availability? The X510 should be available later in September for $399.

Source: Lian Li

Lian Li Releases PC-V33 Small Footprint ATX Cube Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 3, 2015 - 01:04 PM |
Tagged: Test Bench, PC-V33, Lian Li, enclosure, atx case, aluminum case

Lian Li has announced a new enclosure along the lines of the PC-Q33 (a mini-ITX enclosure we reviewed here), but this new PC-V33 houses a full ATX motherboard inside its cube-like, hinged exterior.


If you’ve looked into open test benches at all you’ll really appreciate the design of the PC-V33, which essentially takes that idea and adds a cover that conveniently folds down on a hinge, exposing all components. This is a very unconventional design, and one I really appreciated when reviewing the mini-ITX version. So what’s new besides the larger size and support for ATX motherboards?

Here’s a quick rundown of the enclosure’s features:

  • Unique flip-open canopy, opens to test bench style ease of access
  • Full ATX size build in compact mid-tower case
  • Full sized PSU and GPU card supported
  • Up to 240mm internal radiator support
  • Redesigned rear vents with increased air flow
  • New shock-absorbing drive cage
  • Easy-open side doors with no screws and toolless design throughout
  • Black or silver full aluminum or add a tempered glass side wall

In addition to supporting full-sized components and 240mm radiators, there is also support for tower air coolers up to 190mm high, and the case also features a rubber-damped hard drive cage (and drives have their own 120mm exhaust fan). How much space will the PC-V33 take up on your desk? Dimensions are (WxHxD) 13.15" x 13.86" x 15.35", which are on par with an open test bench case.


The MSRP of the standard version is $199 and the version with a glass side panel is $229. The PC-V33 will available in early September.

Source: Lian Li
Manufacturer: Phanteks

Introduction and First Impressions

The Enthoo Pro M is the new mid-tower version of the Enthoo Pro, previously a full-tower ATX enclosure from the PC cooler and enclosure maker. This new enclosure adds another option to the $79 case market, which already has a number of solid options. Let's see how it stacks up!


I was very impressed by the Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ATX enclosure, which received our Editor’s Choice award when reviewed earlier this year. The enclosure was very solidly made and had a number of excellent features, and even with a primarily aluminum construction and premium design it can be found for $119, rather unheard-of for this combination in the enclosure market. So what changes from that design might be expect to see with the $79 Enthoo Pro M?

The Pro M is a very businesslike design, constructed of steel and plastic, and with a very understated appearance. Not exactly “boring”, as it does have some personality beyond the typical rectangular box, with a brushed finish to the front panel which also features a vented front fan opening, and a side panel window to show off your build. But I think the real story here is the intelligent internal design, which is nearly identical to that of the EVOLV ATX.

Continue reading our review of the Phanteks Enthoo Pro M enclosure!!

NZXT Introduces Razer Edition of Source S340 Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 25, 2015 - 01:49 PM |
Tagged: Source S340, razer, nzxt, mid-tower, enclosure, case

NZXT has created another modified enclosure in conjunction with Razer gaming, and this time it's a new take on the excellent Source S340 mid-tower (reviewed on this very website!).


As expected given the Razer branding this is a matte black enclosure with no shortage of green lighting, including a green underglow light. It's a look those familiar with the Razer edition of the H440 will be quite familiar with.

"Forged to match your Razer arsenal, the new custom design features a backlit Triple-Headed Snake logo, tinted window, illuminated LED power button, underglow, and green USB ports."


The special Designed by Razer edition of the S340 is up for pre-order today at the NZXT store, and this version is listed at $99.99 - a considerable jump from the standard S340's $69.99 price tag.

Source: NZXT

Lian Li and ASUS ROG Create Mini-ITX Gaming Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 18, 2015 - 12:26 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li, ASUS ROG, mini-itx, enclosure, case, gaming

Lian Li has announced a new mini-ITX enclosure featuring ASUS ROG branding, and this compact gaming case supports full size power supplies and larger liquid coolers, though not everything will fit inside this tiny enclosure.


There are more than a couple of similarities to the NCASE M1, that crowdfunded mini-ITX enclosure that Lian Li built for NCASE, but the PC-Q17 doesn’t support dual-width liquid coolers the same way. Part of this has to do with the side window in this new case, essential to show off your diminutive gaming rig. So where does that 240mm radiator fit?


Not everyone will like having the cooler outside of the enclosure, but it’s nice that the case offers this functionality without having to modify it should you desire this level of CPU (or in the case of an AMD Fury X, GPU) cooling. For many a smaller air cooler could suffice, and as we can see from this build photo it does look very nice housing a complete system.


As usual no pricing or availability information accompanies this announcement.

Source: TechPowerUp
Manufacturer: Antec

Introduction and First Impressions

The Antec Signature Series S10 is the company's new flagship enclosure, and it looks every bit the part. A massive full-tower design with seemingly no expense spared in its design and construction, the S10 boasts many interesting design details. So is it worth the staggering $499 price tag? (Update: A day after our review was published Newegg cut the $499 MSRP by $150, taking the S10 down to $299 after a $50 rebate.) 


The Signature S10 is an interesting product to be sure. Antec, long renowned as a maker of premium cases has in recent years lost some of the cachet that they once had with enthusiasts. This is no reflection on Antec and more a result of the industy's flood of enclosures into the market, with virtually every brand filling all price segments. Corsair, SilverStone, Fractal Design, Lian Li, Cooler Master, In Win, NZXT, BitFenix, Phanteks, and the list goes on and on...

So where does the new S10 enclosure fit into this market? Antec made the daring move of placing the Signature enclosure directly at the top with a shocking $499 retail price - which subsequently dropped to $449 and then again to $349 before a $50 rebate. I can think of no other recent enclosure this expensive at launch other than the In Win S-Frame, and it positioned the S10 as an unattainable object for most builders. So was Antec successful in creating an aspirational product - even before the recent price cuts?


Is that... Batman??

Continue reading our review of the Antec Signature S10 enclosure!!

Manufacturer: Phanteks

Introduction and First Impressions

Phanteks has expanded their Enthoo enclosure lineup with a new ATX version of the popular EVOLV case, and it offers a striking design and some unique features to help it stand out in the mid-tower market.



Phanteks first came to my attention with their large double tower cooler PH-TC14, which competes directly with the Noctua NH-D14 in the CPU air-cooling market. But like a lot of other cooling companies (Cooler Master, Corsair, etc.) Phanteks also offers a full lineup of enclosures as well. Of these the Enthoo EVOLV, which until today has only been available in a micro-ATX and mini-ITX version, has been well-received and has a angular, minimalist look that I like quite a bit. Enter the EVOLV ATX.

With the larger size to this new EVOLV ATX there is not only room for a full-size motherboard, but much more room for components and cooling as well. The internal layout is very similar to the recently reviewed Fractal Design Define S enclosure, with no storage (5.25” or 3.5”) inside the front of the case, which gives the EVOLV ATX a totally open layout. The front is solid metal (though well vented) so we’ll see how this affects cooling, and it will be interesting to see how Phanteks has approached internal storage with the design as well. Let’s get started!


Continue reading our review of the Phanteks Enthoo EVOLV ATX enclosure!!

Introduction and First Impressions

Supermicro recently entered the consumer space with a new line of enthusiast motherboards and today we’re looking at a gaming enclosure from the well-known enterprise manufacturer.


While many component manufacturers have diversified their product offerings to include everything from cooling fans to thumb drives, Supermicro is not a name that anyone familiar with the company would have likely suspected of this trend. With recent Z97 and X99 motherboard offerings Supermicro has made an effort to enter the enthusiast market with boards that don’t exactly look like gaming products, but this is to be expected from a company that specializes in the enterprise market.

It was something of a surprise to hear that Supermicro had created a new enclosure for the consumer segment, and even more so to hear that it was to be a gaming enclosure. And while the term “gaming” gets thrown around quite a bit the new enclosure does have the look we tend to associate with the moniker, with flashy red accents and a brushed aluminum front panel to go along with all-black steel enclosure.


Continue reading our review of the Supermicro SuperChassis S5 enclosure!!

Manufacturer: Fractal Design

Introduction and First Impressions

The Define S from Fractal Design is a mid-tower enclosure based on the company’s excellent Define R5, and this version has a new interior for enhanced cooling support with an innovative approach to storage.



I've mentioned before that the PC enclosure market is crowded with options at every price point, but this can actually be a good thing because of the high level of individual preference this permits. Selecting a case is a multi-faceted thing, and while they all (well, mostly) keep components safely housed, once that need has been met there's a lot more to consider. Let's face it, aesthetics are important since the enclosure is the outward-facing representation of your build (and personal style). Support for your preferred type of cooling, storage, and future expandability are high on the list when selecting a finalist as well, and then there's the thermal/noise performance element to consider. It was Fractal Design's own Define R5 (review here) which offered a balanced approach to these needs, and while not looking especially flashy with understated style and a standard ATX layout, the R5 was an exceptionally well-done effort overall. Now, months later, enter the Define S.

With the Define R5 offering a solid combination of silence, expandability, and build quality, why would Fractal Design create another very similar case right on its heels? It’s all about giving people choice, and that’s something I can certainly stand behind - even when it means further segmenting a market that seems almost impossibly crowded now. And when we dive deeper into the Define S we see what is essentially a companion to the Define R5, and not a replacement. At first glance this might appear to be an identical case, but the interior layout clearly separates the two. In summary, the Define S loses 5.25” storage support found in the R5, and while that previous model had no less than 8 hard drive trays the S employs a novel approach to HDD support, but cuts the drive support from 8 standard 3.5" drives to just 3 in the process.


Continue reading our review of the Fractal Design Define S enclosure!!

NZXT Announces the Noctis 450 Gaming Mid-Tower Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 28, 2015 - 09:29 PM |
Tagged: nzxt, Noctis 450, mid-tower, enclosure, case

NZXT proclaims that “bold is back” with their new enclosure design, a striking-looking case based (at least internally) on the popular H440.


The Noctis 450 takes the H440 and combines it with an angular external construction that looks similar to the company’s Phantom enclosure series. As the interior is identical to the H440 this new enclosure features the spacious interior and excellent cooling support from the previous model. As a nice addition the Noctis 450 adds a PWM fan controller (and includes 4 fans), further simplifying cooling for a build with this case.

NZXT has created a product video to showcase the new design:

In the appearance department the Noctis 450 really does look good (although style is always a personal thing), with dramatic black/red and the familiar NZXT white/black color schemes available to help accent the interesting angles, and there is an adjustable LED lighting system as well.


Plenty of storage room (unless you're Allyn) with 5 slide-out HDD trays

The MSRP is set at $139.99 and the Noctis 450 is currently available for pre-order on the NZXT site.

Source: NZXT