Corsair Unleashes Vengeance Extreme, the World's Fastest Rated PC Memory Kits

Subject: Memory | March 14, 2013 - 04:13 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-3000, corsair, Vengeance Extreme, dual channel

Corsair is taking Xtreme Memory Profiles to the next level with an extremely limited release of DDR3-3000 2x4GB kits, for the low, low price of $750.  They list two motherboard with BIOSes capable of hitting that speed and perhaps higher for those willing to move to exotic cooling solutions using the included cooler.  The 1.65V is high but not insane, possibly due to the timings of 12-14-14-36 but you will probably need to up the power if you are intending on pushing these DIMMs past 3GHz.  You can try to pick them up directly from Corsair.

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FREMONT, California — March 14, 2013 — Corsair, a worldwide designer and supplier of high-performance components to the PC hardware market, today announced new Vengeance Extreme 8GB dual-channel DDR3 memory kits rated at 3000MHz, the world's fastest rated production PC memory kits. Fitted with low profile "racing red" heat spreaders, the new 2x4GB memory kits operate at 3000MHz air-cooled, with latency settings of 12-14-14-36, at 1.65V. A Kingpin Cooling memory cooler is included for overclockers who want to use LN2 (liquid nitrogen) to reach memory speeds well beyond 3000MHz.

The extreme-speed 3000MHz rating of the Vengeance Extreme memory kits is the result of a rigorous internal four-stage hand-screening process performed by Corsair engineers. This process is passed by fewer than one in 50 memory ICs. Performance qualification is performed on select Intel Z77 based motherboards, including the ASUS P8Z77-I DELUXE and ASRock Z77 OC Formula. To hit their rated speeds, the modules require a 3rd Generation Intel Core unlocked processor with an Integrated Memory Controller capable of running 3000MHz.

“We are focused on helping enthusiasts and overclockers push the boundaries of PC performance," said Thi La, Senior VP and GM of Memory and Enthusiast Component Products at Corsair. “Our engineering team's hard work has led to new performance optimization techniques for memory, which we are pleased to debut in our new Vengeance Extreme memory."

Pricing and Availability
The Vengeance Extreme 3000MHz 8GB memory kits are priced at $749.99 USD and will be available exclusively from Corsair.com in March. Quantities of these hand-built modules will be extremely limited.

Source: Corsair

G.Skill would like to know if you can handle 32GB of DDR3-2400

Subject: Memory | February 7, 2013 - 07:13 PM |
Tagged: G.Skill Trident X, DDR3-2400, 32GB, dual channel

At $280 the 32GB kit of DDR3-2400 RAM from G.Skill costs more than an SSD but if you consider what you would have paid for 4GB of DDR3 when it first hit the market you can't argue that the price of a kit like this has fallen drastically.  The timings are not even particularly loose for DIMMs of this speed, 10-12-12-31 @ 2T is not too shabby, though Neoseeker didn't have much luck tightening them as they couldn't get to the fully rated speed of the DIMMs due to their motherboard not being able to support that speed.  Keep note of that, many motherboards simply do not have 2400MHz as a choice in the BIOS and many CPUs won't be able to keep these DIMMs fully active.  You could always opt for using a goodly chunk of the memory as a RAM drive, no matter what speed your BIOS supports.  Check the full review here.

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"Today I will be looking at G. Skill's Trident X DDR3 2400MHz 32GB quad channel memory kit. With their goal of extreme overclocking performance, G. Skill uses the highest quality memory IC's available when manufacturing their memory. To ensure trouble-free operation, their memory undergoes rigorous testing to verify their craftsmanship and performance."

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Source: Neoseeker

When will we change the naming convention? Kingston's new 2.67GHz DDR3 kit

Subject: Memory | November 2, 2012 - 01:46 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperx predator, ddr3-2666, dual channel

In order to get the most out of Kingston's HyperX Predator 2.67GHz 8GB dual channel kit you need a serious processor, even high end Ivy Bridge processors cannot fully benefit from the entire available bandwidth.  To that end Pro-Clockers used the SB-E Core i7 3930K which is more often utilized in quad channel but in this case is using high frequency dual channel DDR3.  There is no question the memory is fast if you have a motherboard and CPU which allows memory to run at that frequency and Pro-Clockers testing implies that it is going as fast as it can stably at that particular XMP setting.  There are other profiles available, with tighter timings which means this kit can be of use for someone looking for lower frequency memory at tighter timings that the default 11-13-13-26 @ 1T.

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"Over the past few months we have had the pleasure of reviewing some very fast memory. We have seen some 1866MHz kits from the likes of Corsair, Crucial, G.Skill and Kingston. And the fastest up to this day has been a kit from G.Skill which was dialed in at 2400MHz by default. But today we are topping that with a new 2666MHz kit from Kingston. The HyperX Predator at 2666MHz boast timings at 11-13-13-26 and some pretty awesome heat spreaders."

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Source: Pro-Clockers

Intel Extreme Masters DIMMs, beyond XMP?

Subject: Memory | October 16, 2012 - 08:16 PM |
Tagged: patriot, Intel Extreme Masters Edition, ddr3-2133, 8gb, dual channel

It looks like there is a new memory rating on the market from Patriot, Intel Extreme Masters which purports to be hand tested for perfect XMP compatibility as well as sporting a new heatsink design.  Timings of 11-11-11-27 for DDR3-2133 are rather impressive as is 9-9-9-24 at DDR3-1600 and Bjorn 3D managed to overclock it to 2300MHz.  They did question the default 3T setting of the DIMMs as they ran fine at 2T though trying for 1T at those speeds is not only pushing it but questionably useful for anything but an heavily overclocked i7 CPU.

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"Nowadays, memory tends to be more of a battle over who can bin the tightest, as all IC’s shipping for the most part are pretty much the same. In the memory market it all comes down to how you can differentiate yourself from the same old stuff that we may see every day. Patriot has the new Viper 3 series which is what this kit is part of, and carrying the “Intel Extreme Masters” means it went through extensive testing to prove utmost compatibility with new DDR3 motherboards and XMP easy tuning."

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Source: Bjorn3D

Who needs DDR4 with Kingston's DDR3-2800 kit?

Subject: Memory | May 8, 2012 - 06:56 PM |
Tagged: kingston hyper x, dual channel, ddr3-2800, ddr3, 4GB

If you have a dual channel motherboard that can handle the fastest RAM on the market, why not find out if it can support Kingston's Hyper T1 DDR3-2800 4GB kit?  Legit Reviews tried it on the Gigabyte GA-Z77X-UD5H at both 2800MHz @ 12-14-14-32 as well as 2666MHz @ 11-14-14-30.  Don't expect much overclocking potential at this speed unfortunately, nor are all motherboards going to support the full speed XMP of these DIMMs but Kingston can be proud of the speed at which they've pushed these DIMMs to.

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"The Kingston Hyper T1 4GB 2800MHz memory kit that we looked at here today did a superb job on our motherboard that features the Intel Z77 Express chipset and the Intel Core i7-3770K Ivy Bridge processor. We ran this kit from 800MHZ with CL6 timings all they way up to 2800MHz with CL12 timings. It is pretty wild to see a 2000MHz spread with a memory kit, but this kit was up for the task..."

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Author:
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: GSkill

Memory? Why?

Aaah memory.  It has been some time since we last had a memory review, and for good reason.  Memory got pretty boring.  Ten years ago this was not the case.  DDR was just fresh on the scene and we were starting to see memory speeds and bandwidths get to a place where it would have a significant effect on performance.  Latencies were of utmost importance, and the fastest 2.2.2.6 DIMMs running at DDR 400 speeds were often quite expensive.  Then things sort of mellowed out.  DDR-2 did not exactly bring faster performance over DDR initially, and it was not until DDR-2 800 and 1066 speeds that we actually saw a significant boost over previous gen DDR 1.  DDR-3 brought even more yawns.  With the jump to integrated memory controllers from both AMD and Intel, DDR-3 speeds were nearly meaningless.

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The primary reason for this rather vanilla time in the memory market was that of individual bandwidth needs for CPU cores.  Most research into this issue points to an individual CPU core needing only 3 to 4 GB/sec of bandwidth to support its data needs.  AMD and Intel have gone to great lengths to increase the efficiency of not only their memory controllers and prefetchers, but also the internal caches so fewer main memory accesses are needed.  So essentially a quad core processor would really only need upwards of 12 to 13 GB/sec of bandwidth in real world scenarios.  DDR-3 1333 memory modules in a dual channel configuration would be able to support that kind of bandwidth quite easily.  So what exactly was the point of having faster memory?  Also, CPUs using DDR-3 memory are not as sensitive to latencies as we have seen in previous generations of parts.

Click to read the rest of the article.

VisionTek offers good overclocking and a great warranty; shame about the price

Subject: Memory | November 3, 2011 - 06:35 PM |
Tagged: VisionTek, Ultimate Performance PC3-12800 CL9 1600EX, ddr3-1600, dual channel

Perhaps the first thing you should notice about Visiontek's Ultimate Performance PC3-12800 CL9 1600EX is that it sports a lifetime warranty if you register it within 30 days of purchasing it.  After that the specs naturally follow, DDR3-1600 @ 9-9-9-24 or if you drop to 10-10-10-24  you may be able to hit 1900MHz as Red & Blackness Mods did. Part of that overclock is probably due to the large heatspreaders on the RAM which are effective but could interfere with the installation of a CPU heatsink in some configurations.  There is one small problem with this kit, it is priced over $60 which might seem like a good deal for 8GB of RAM ... if you haven't shopped around and noticed that many equivalent DIMMs are available for 20% less.

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"Today we are taking a look at a brand new product from Visiontek, the videocard manufacturer has turned their heads on to the memory market. We recieved a sample of their performance ram named “Visiontek Ultimate Performance Pc3-12800 CL9 1600EX”. So how can this brand new ram from Visiontek perform? Lets not waste any time and figure out what kind of performance that we can expect!"

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Corsair's new cerulean blue RAM, with extra fins

Subject: Memory | October 18, 2011 - 12:27 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Vengeance 8GB DDR3-1600, dual channel

If you liked Sonic the Hedgehog you'll love Corsair's new Vengeance 8GB DDR3-1600 kit, which is every bit as blue and spiky as the games star.  It might even be faster, with timings of 9-9-9-24 @ 2T by default at 1.5V.  Legit Reviews spent some time trying to get these DIMMs to overclock and found that while they could not tighten the timings they were able to drop the command rate to 1T, or loosen the timings and run the DIMMs at 1866MHz.  It is currently available for about $50 if you shop around, not a bad deal for 8GB of speedy DDR3.

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"The Corsair Vengeance 8GB DDR3 1600 CL9 memory kit comes in what Corsair calls "Cerulean Blue", which Corsair claims is designed to match the color found on motherboards supporting 2nd Generation Intel Core Sandy Bridge processors. To our eyes, this particular shade of blue is only found on ASUS motherboards, although other manufacturers such as Gigabyte and MSI do offer motherboards with blue accents..."

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