Podcast #376 - Intel Speed Shift, CPU Coolers from Noctua and DEEPCOOL, Broadwell-E Rumors, and more!

Subject: General Tech | November 19, 2015 - 02:42 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, noctua, Deepcool, Gamer Storm Gabriel, Intel, speed shift, amd, R9, fury x, trixx, Broadwell-E, kaby lake, nvidia, shield tablet k1, knights landing, asus, chromebit

PC Perspective Podcast #376 - 11/19/2015

Join us this week as we discuss Intel Speed Shift, CPU Coolers from Noctua and DEEPCOOL, Broadwell-E Rumors, and more!

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Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Sebastian Peak

Program length: 1:19:22

  1. Week in Review:
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  3. News item of interest:
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
  5. Closing/outro

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Introduction and First Impressions

DEEPCOOL's Gabriel is part of their Gamer Storm series of products, and this low-profile design is rated up to 95 W to keep the latest processors cool under load. So how does it perform? We'll take a close look at the performance of this mini-ITX inspired air cooler in today's review.


(Image credit: DEEPCOOL)

There are so many inexpensive options for air cooling on the market that it's almost overwhelming. At the top of the list in popularity are low-cost tower coolers from Cooler Master, with the ubiquitous Hyper 212 Evo at around $30, and the slightly smaller Hyper T4 at $25. But with a height of 159 mm for the 212 Evo and 152.3 mm for the T4 these coolers are not going to fit in every situation - and certainly not in a slim enclosure. There are plenty of low-profile CPU coolers on the market, one of the lowest being the Noctua NH-L9i, a $40-ish cooler which stands just 37 mm tall (with the fan!), but the tan and reddish-brown color scheme isn't for everyone, and the ultra-low profile design (which is also limited to a 92 mm fan) won't be required for many builds.

So when I began looking for a low-profile air cooler for my own use recently one of the options that cought my eye was this Gabriel, part of DEEPCOOL's Gamer Storm line.  The Gabriel had the advantage of being just $34.99 on Newegg when I picked it up, making it less expensive (and less tan and brown) than the Noctua. At 60 mm tall with its 120 mm fan installed, the Gabriel should fit in most low-profile enclosures, considering even half-height expansion cards are a bit taller at about 69 mm. The Gabriel also offers an understated look with a grey (well, mostly grey) fan. Of course appearances mean nothing unless it's well made and cools effectively, and for myself the question became, is this going to rival the experience of a Noctua (long my preferred brand) CPU cooler?

Continue reading our review of the DEEPCOOL Gamer Storm Gabriel CPU cooler!!

Deepcool's GamerStorm Tristellar enclosure; is it an engine block? An original series Viper?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 13, 2015 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, gamerstrom tristeller, mini ITX

If you want a unique looking case then the Deepcool GamerStorm Tristellar certainly fits the bill, this is the only case with three physically separate chambers for your components.  The question about the effectiveness of the design remains, can it keep those components safe and cool?  Kitguru had a chance to test the case out, a 3.9GHz Intel Core i7-4770K and Sapphire Tri-X R9 290 used ensure that this case really gets a workout.  In the test the temperatures and noise levels were higher than the competition but certainly within reasonable ranges and they had no issues with stability.  It takes a bit of work to install the system in this case and an MSRP which will be at least $500 may make the case less attractive to some but it certainly will stand out on your desk or at a LAN Party.


"One glance at the Mini ITX Deepcool GamerStorm Tristellar makes it clear this isn’t a run-of-the-mill PC case. In fact you might struggle to tell it is a PC case at all."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Source: KitGuru

This is your Steampunk on DARKCOOL

Subject: Cases and Cooling | April 9, 2015 - 06:25 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool

If slanted faux vents with LED lights in them and a front grill say Steampunk to you then the DEEPCOOL Steam Castle might just be up your alley.  On the other hand if sturdy construction, colour matching and a design which is ornate yet functional is closer to your preference then this might not be the case you are looking for.  Style design aside, the case does sport well designed filters, large fans to lower the noise generated and providing cooling performance that was far better than [H]ard|OCP is used to seeing.  The MSRP is also under $100, giving you a unique looking and well performing enclosure without a large investment.


"It is one of those moments that you go, "Uh, what?" Deepcool Industries comes to us today with its Steam Castle micro-ATX and mini-ITX computer case for smaller system configurations. While your definition of "steam-punk" may differ from Deepcool's, one thing for sure is this case is unique in its look. How does it perform however?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Source: [H]ard|OCP

CES 2015: Deepcool Tristellar and Pentower Mini-ITX Cases Launched with Outlandish Designs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 9, 2015 - 04:02 PM |
Tagged: mini-itx, enclosure, Deepcool, ces 2015, CES, cases

Deepcool has announced a couple of new mini-ITX enclosures, and they are anything but average.


The Deepcool Tristellar (Credit: Legit Reviews)

First we have one of the wildest looking enclosures at I’ve ever seen (other than the In Win D-Frame mini), and it looks very much like an Imperial shuttle (ROTJ, anyone?). With three sections connected to a central hub, the Tristellar has the look of some sort of spacecraft, and would appear at first glance to be rather complicated to build in (though I'd love to find out first-hand).


Exploded view of the Tristellar (Credit: Legit Reviews)

The enclosure was featured as the basis of an upcoming gaming system from CyberPower, and it would indeed house a capable gaming machine with support for mini-ITX motherboards, full-size graphics cards, and standard ATX power supplies.

The second case is a little more conventional on the surface, but again we have a design that is quite a departure.


The Pentower enclosure (Credit: Legit Reviews)

The upright Pentower enclosure seems to borrow from the design of the latest-gen Mac Pro (albeit in a less cylindrical fashion), but is not built upon the Mac’s cooling design (in which the CPU and GPU are directly connected to the large central heatsink). Such a design seems ideal for this enclosure shape, but Deepcool has implemented their own air cooling system here.


The Mac Pro’s thermal design (Credit: Apple, Inc)

With the Pentower standard components can be used and installation should be relatively easy since “after the shell is removed, all of the panels and trestles are exposed (and) users can install units directly without uninstall(ing) any other part of the case“, according to the press release.

There is no listing for the Tristellar or Pentower cases on the Deepcool website as of today, and naturally pricing and availability have not been announced.

Coverage of CES 2015 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2015 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Deep Cool's first watercooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240

Subject: Cases and Cooling | October 31, 2014 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240, LCS, water cooling

The Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 has a unique look with its LED and bright red fans but also hides a pump with a closed impeller which is intended to increase the performance at the same time as it reduces vibrations.  As the name implies the radiator roughly 240mm in size, 274 x 120 x 27mm to be exact with 0.2mm high-density water micro channels.  HiTech Legion tested it against a variety of coolers and found the performance to be similar to the competitions, though unfortunately at a much higher price point.  However it was almost silent in operation and the fans could be run on low speed without effecting the performance so for those who have a strong desire for a silent system might be willing to pay the $106 MSRP.


"Deep Cool has done this with their first liquid CPU cooler, the Gamer Storm Maelstrom 240 AIO Liquid Cooling. Do we see the force of a Maelstrom being represented? You be the judge. They use a unique pump with closed impeller to offer more power, less vibration, and lower noise as a result."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


The Ice Wind Pro is a breeze to install

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 24, 2012 - 01:57 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Ice Wind Pro, heatsink

One neglected feature of heatsinks has always been the ease of installation, which has become much worse now that many heatsinks are so heavy they require a backplate to prevent its weight from damaging your socket or motherboard.  For those who would prefer a heatsink that can be installed without needed to access the back of the motherboard, or even removing the board from its case, DeepCool's Ice Wind Pro might be a good choice.  At 650g it is light compared to many other models and the handy bracket offers more than enough support for that weight.  Of course there are some downsides to such a light cooler, check out how well it could cool a CPU over at Overclockers Club.


"The thing that impressed me the most about this cooler, believe it or not, was its installation process. The 100% tool-free, in-case, no-rear-access-required installation went through like a breeze. It took only minutes to go from having no cooler to having this one installed. It's the first of its kind that is done this way and I hope other manufacturers take a step for lighter-end coolers that can get away without a heavy-duty mounting mechanism. The cooler's build quality is top notch, which follows in the steps of previous DEEPCOOL heat sinks that I have had the opportunity to review."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:



Deepcool's tall and thin Ice Wind Pro heatsink

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 10, 2012 - 06:07 PM |
Tagged: Deepcool, Ice Wind Pro

At 157mm tall the Deepcool Ice Wind Pro stands among the tallest heatsinks but at 86mm deep it is much thinner which also means its weight is lower, at 650g.  The heatpipes contact the CPU directly and FrostyTech's measurements show the contact area to be completely flat which is very important for the efficiency of the cooler.  The noise generated at low speeds is negligible and even when turned to high to give better cooling performance it is still not very loud.  At high speed the cooler does provide good cooling even though it for both AMD and Intel processors, even if it is very slim, so if you are building a system using RAM with tall heatspreaders then this cooler is very much worth considering.


"Deepcool's Ice Wind Pro heatsink is a rather novel CPU cooler for two unique qualities; 1) its heatpipe-to-fin arrangement and 2) the geometry of its leading and trailing fin edges. First off, rather than clusters of heatpipes at the left and right sides of the aluminum fin tower, the eight ends of the heatpipes are lined up straight in a row, 10mm apart, right down the middle of the heatsink. Secondly, the leading/trailing edges of the aluminum fin stack have five large, slightly arc'd diamond cut-outs parallel to the direction of the fins that break up the otherwise monolithic wall."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:



Source: Frosty Tech

DeepCool's new heatsink has a shallow footprint

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 14, 2011 - 06:25 PM |
Tagged: SFF, quiet, IceEdge 400XT, Deepcool

At only 127x100x85mm and 585 grams the new Deepcool IceEdge 400XT heatsink seems rather small, as does it's 92mm fan.  It is not quite half the size of top end coolers but is certainly less than 2/3rds the size.  FrostyTech tested to see how the reduced weight and surface area impacted the effectiveness of this cooler in their latest review. The results placed it in the middle of the pack for both cooling performance and noise levels, with many other low noise heatsinks providing better cooling; however they also tend to be much larger.  If you are cooling a i5 or Llano based system with limited space then Deepcool's new heatsink is worth looking into.


"Deepcool's IceEdge 400XT heatsink is a mid-size tower cooler that stands a modest 127mm high and weighs 585 grams. At its heart are four, 6mm diameter copper heatpipes and a 92x100mm stack of dark nickel plated aluminum fins. As with DeepCool's other heatsinks, the IceEdge 400XT ships with a novel rubber clad 92mm PWM fan. Every bit of the fan frame that makes contact with the heatsink is covered in a rubbery material so motor vibrations are greatly diminished. The 92mm DeepCool brand fan spins at 2200-900RPM and moves ~40CFM air according to the maker."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:



Source: Frosty Tech