Computex 2014: ADATA Announces 2TB SandForce SF3700 Series PCIe and M.2 SSDs, DDR4 Memory

Subject: Memory, Storage | June 4, 2014 - 11:15 AM |
Tagged: ssd, solid state drive, pcie, pci-e ssd, memory, M.2, ddr4, computex 2014, computex, adata, 2tb ssd

ADATA has been showing off some upcoming products at Computex, and it's all about DRAM.

adata_logo.jpg

We'll begin with an upcoming line of PCIe Enterprise/Server SSDs powered by the SandForce SF3700-series controller. We've been waiting for products with the SF3700 controller since January, when ADATA showed a prototype board at CES, and ADATA is now showcasing the controller in the "SR1020" series drives.

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The first is a 2TB 2.5" drive, but the interface was not announced (and the sample on the floor appeared to be an empty shell).  The listed specs are performance up to 1800MB/s and 150K IOPS, with the drive powered by the SF-3739 controller.  Support for both AHCI and NVMe is also listed, along with the usual TRIM, NCQ, and SMART support.

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Another 2TB SSD was shown with exactly the same specs as the 2.5" version, but this one is built on the M.2 spec. The drive will connect via 4 lanes of Gen 2 PCI Express. Both drives in ADATA's SR1020 PCIe SSD lineup will be available in capacities from 240GB - 2TB, and retail pricing and availability is forthcoming.

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Continuing the DRAM theme, ADATA also showed new DDR4 modules in commodity and enthusiast flavors. Both of the registered DIMMs on display (an ultra-low profile DIMM was also shown) had standard DDR4 specs of 2133MHz at 1.2V, but ADATA also showed some performance DDR4 at their booth.

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A pair of XPG Z1 DDR4 modules in action

No pricing or availability just yet on these products.

Source: ADATA

AMD Shows Off ARM-Based Opteron A1100 Server Processor And Reference Motherboard

Subject: Processors | May 8, 2014 - 12:26 AM |
Tagged: TrustZone, server, seattle, PCI-E 3.0, opteron a1100, opteron, linux, Fedora, ddr4, ARMv8, arm, amd, 64-bit

AMD showed off its first ARM-based “Seattle” processor running on a reference platform motherboard at an event in San Francisco earlier this week. The new chip, which began sampling in March, is slated for general availability in Q4 2014. The “Seattle” processor will be officially labeled the AMD Opteron A1100.

During the press event, AMD demonstrated the Opteron A1100 running on a reference design motherboard (the Seattle Development Platform). The hardware was used to drive a LAMP software stack including an ARM optimized version of Linux based on RHEL, Apache 2.4.6, MySQL 5.5.35, and PHP 5.4.16. The server was then used to host a WordPress blog that included stream-able video.

AMD Seattle Development Platform Opteron A1100.jpg

Of course, the hardware itself is the new and interesting bit and thanks to the event we now have quite a few details to share.

The Opteron A1100 features eight ARM Cortex-A57 cores clocked at 2.0 GHz (or higher). AMD has further packed in an integrated memory controller, TrustZone encryption hardware, and floating point and NEON video acceleration hardware. Like a true SoC, the Opteron A1100 supports 8 lanes of PCI-E 3.0, eight SATA III 6Gbps ports, and two 10GbE network connections.

The Seattle processor has a total of 4MB of L2 cache (each pair of cores shares 1MB of L2) and 8MB L3 cache that all eight cores share. The integrated memory controller supports DDR3 and DDR4 memory in SO-DIMM, unbuffered DIMM, and registered ECC RDIMM forms (only one type per motherboard) enabling the ARM-based platform to be used in a wide range of server environments (enterprise, SMB, and home servers et al).

AMD has stated that the upcoming Opteron A1100 processor delivers between two and four times the performance of the existing Opteron X series (which uses four x86 Jaguar cores clocked at 1.9 GHz). The A1100 has a 25W TDP and is manufactured by Global Foundries. Despite the slight increase in TDP versus the Opteron X series (the Opteron X2150 is a 22W part), AMD claims the increased performance results in notable improvements in compute/watt performance.

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AMD has engineered a reference motherboard though partners will also be able to provide customized solutions. The combination of reference motherboard and ARM-based Opteron A1100 is known at the Seattle Development Platform. This reference motherboard features four registered DDR3 DIMM slots for up to 128GB of memory, eight SATA 6Gbps ports, support for standard ATX power supplies, and multiple PCI-E connectors that can be configured to run as a single PCI-E 3.0 x8 slot or two PCI-E 3.0 x4 slots.

The Opteron A1100 is an interesting move from AMD that will target low power servers. the ARM-based server chip has an uphill battle in challenging x86-64 in this space, but the SoC does have several advantages in terms of compute performance per watt and overall cost. AMD has taken the SoC elements (integrated IO, memory, companion processor hardware) of the Opteron X series and its APUs in general, removed the graphics portion, and crammed in as many low power 64-bit ARM cores as possible. This configuration will have advantages over the Opteron X CPU+GPU APU when running applications that use multiple serial threads and can take advantage of large amounts of memory per node (up to 128GB). The A1100 should excel in serving up files and web pages or acting as a caching server where data can be held in memory for fast access.

I am looking forward to the launch as the 64-bit ARM architecture makes its first major inroads into the server market. The benchmarks, and ultimately software stack support, will determine how well it is received and if it ends up being a successful product for AMD, but at the very least it keeps Intel on its toes and offers up an alternative and competitive option.

Source: Tech Report

SK Hynix Develops 128GB Stick of DDR4 RAM

Subject: General Tech, Memory | April 8, 2014 - 02:03 AM |
Tagged: Hynix, ddr4

... I'll take two.

SK Hynix, one of the leading producers of RAM modules, announced a single stick of DDR4 with 128GB capacity. While this is intended for the server room, I hope that we will see workstation components attempt to be compatible in the near future. It is difficult to find a board that can support more than 64GB at all, let alone twice that, per stick.

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As for the typical desktop users? Let's face it, this is overkill, eight times over, generously, per stick. Web browsers are beginning to ring up the memory usage as more and more tabs are loaded simultaneously but, otherwise, there is little use for it for them.

But for those of us who are not them, this could be awesome. It is still unclear how much memory a Haswell-EX motherboard, running on an Intel X99 chipset, will support. I can assume that this stick will not be compatible... but we can always hope, right?

Source: SK Hynix

ADATA Moves Quickly on New DDR4 Specification

Subject: General Tech | April 3, 2014 - 03:00 PM |
Tagged: adata, ddr4, xeon

ADATA has been rather busy lately, the release of the brand new Premiere Pro SSD family and now the launch of DDR4 modules for the next generation of Xeon processors.  These new DIMMs follow the current trend of energy efficiency in the server room by dropping the required voltage to 1.2V which can add up to quite a bit in a large server farm.  The specified speed of 2133MHz is attractive for a first gen server RDIMM though there does not seem to be much information available on the timings.

Taipei, Taiwan – April 3, 2014 - ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND Flash application products, has announced the launch of new DDR4 modules. Working in close cooperation with Intel, ADATA has successfully developed and launched DDR4 RDIMM (ECC Registered DIMM) that are fully compatible with the newly announced, next generation platform of Intel Xeon processor E5-2600 v3 product family.

Coming in densities of 4, 8 & 16 gigabytes, the new modules run at 1.2 volts, and at a frequency of 2133MHz. The higher clock frequencies, faster data transfer rates, and low voltage operation of DDR4 memory make it especially suited for use in the growing cloud server, storage and networking application fields.

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According to Jacky Yang, Product Manager at ADATA: “We are enthusiastic about the great potential of this new DDR4 specification, and we will move quickly to bring this new technology to our customers. Currently in development are DDR4 versions of ECC SO-DIMM, VLP RDIMM, & LRDIMM, so we look forward to providing the stability and reliability that ADATA is known for in a low voltage and high performance package.”

Source: ADATA

Intel Confirms Haswell-E, 8-core Extreme Edition with DDR4 Memory

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 08:00 PM |
Tagged: X99, Intel, Haswell-E, gdc 14, GDC, ddr4

While talking with press at GDC in San Francisco today, Intel is pulling out all the stops to assure enthusiasts and gamers that they haven't been forgotten!  Since the initial release of the first Extreme Edition processor in 2003 (Pentium 4), Intel has moved from 1.7 million transistors to over 1.8 BILLION (Ivy Bride-E). Today Intel officially confirms that Haswell-E is coming!

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Details are light, but we know now that this latest incarnation of the Extreme Edition processor will be an 8-core design, running on a new Intel X99 chipset and will be the first to support DDR4 memory technology.  I think most of us are going to be very curious about the changes, both in pricing and performance, that the new memory technology will bring to the table for enthusiast and workstation users.

Timing is only listed as the second half of 2014, so we are going to be (impatiently) waiting along with you for more details.

Though based only on leaks that we found last week, the X99 chipset and Haswell-E will continue to have 40 lanes of PCI Express but increases the amount of SATA 6G ports from two to ten (!!) and USB 3.0 ports to six.  

CES 2014: Micron makes further advances in DDR4 memory

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 8, 2014 - 12:57 AM |
Tagged: ram, micron, memory, ddr4, CES 2014, CES

While the Crucial did not have much in the way of new flash memory product launches this year, Micron as a whole has been busily churning out further revisions of DDR4 memory. While our visit last year only revealed a single prototype for us to look at, now we have all of the typical form factors covered:

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From top down we have enterprise, enthusiast, OEM, and SO-DIMM form factors, all populated with DDR4 parts. All that needs to happen now is for motherboard and portable manufacturers to get on board with the new technology. As with all chicken-and-egg launches, someone needs to take the first plunge, and here we can see Micron has certainly been on the leading edge of things. That enterprise part above is a full 16GB (not bits!) of DDR4 capacity.

Coverage of CES 2014 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2014 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Micron DRAM

Mobile DDR4 arrives from Samsung

Subject: General Tech | January 3, 2014 - 02:56 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, ddr4

Samsung just release the first DIMMs fully compliant with the new DDR4 standard.  The 8Gb LPDDR4 sports 1GB dies and is reported to handle up to 4,266 million transfers per second which if true doubles DDR3's theoretical maximum.  Not only are these DIMMs faster they are also designed to use much lower voltages than the previous generation of LPDDR, a boon to battery life on mobile devices and possibly a hint at possible overclocking potential when they arrive on the desktop.  There isn't a huge amount of info on these new chips but you can keep your eye out for updates here and at The Inquirer.

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"DDR4 is said to offer twice the speed of DDR3, but because it works at lower voltages DDR4 can significantly reduce the power consumption of devices. This is significant because it can lead to increased battery life, which remains the holy grail of handheld equipment designers."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

IDF 2013: G.Skill Unveils DDR4 Memory Modules

Subject: General Tech | September 15, 2013 - 06:11 AM |
Tagged: gskill, G.Skill, ddr4

G.Skill showed off DDR4 memory modules at the Intel Developer Forum last week, and it appears that the technology is well on its way to being ready for Intel's next generation Haswell-E enthusiast platform. The modules that G.Skill showed off werre DDR4 DIMMs clocked at 2,133 MHz and come in 4GB capacities. The modules are manufactured by SK.Hynix and branded and tested by G.Skill. The company did not indicate what voltages they are using, but it is likely at or close to 1.2V given the conservative clockspeed.

GSkill DDR4 2133Mhz Memory Module.jpg

VR-Zone spotted DDR4 DIMMs from G.Skill at IDF.

The modules on the IDF show floor where static engineering samples, which means that they were not functional units. G.Skill indicated to X-bit labs that “the next generation of DDR memory is still under development, and G.Skill is working to push the new technology to its limits in the future.”

As the DDR4 standard and Haswell-E HEDT CPU/motherboard platform is still being worked on, G.Skill still has about a year to improve its modules and offer additional overclocked SKUs (which the company is known for). It is nice to see progress being made on the new memory technology that is said to be a bit faster and require less voltage.

Read more about the progress of DDR4 at PC Perspective.

Source: VR-Zone

Podcast #268 - Intel Bay Trail Tablets, Intel's Quark SoC, and news from IFA and IDF

Subject: General Tech | September 12, 2013 - 03:04 PM |
Tagged: video, quark, podcast, IVB-EP, ifa, idf 2013, idf, hawell-y, E5-2600, ddr4, Bay Trail

PC Perspective Podcast #268 - 09/12/2013

Join us this week as we discuss Intel Bay Trail Tablets, Intel's Quark SoC, and news from IFA and IDF

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
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  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath,  Allyn Malventano, and Morry Teitelman

Program length: 1:20:06

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. 0:49:00 Quick IFA roundup
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Morry: Test bench evolution - Primochill Wet Bench
  4. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  5. Closing/outro

 

Kingston Technology to Demo ECC SO-DIMMs for an Avoton C2000 Microserver and Working DDR4

Subject: General Tech | September 9, 2013 - 02:10 PM |
Tagged: kingston, Avoton, Intel, ddr4

Fountain Valley, CA – September 9, 2013 – Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced they will be showcasing working DDR4 memory, XMP certified HyperX memory on a new Ivybridge-E based desktop, 2133 MHz SO-DIMMs for a Haswell based notebook and ECC memory in an Avoton based microserver at the Intel Developers Forum (IDF) 2013. IDF will be held at the Moscone center in San Francisco, California on September 10th – 12th .

During IDF 2013 Kingston will be showcasing four demo systems. The DDR4 memory demo will highlight 192GB of working 2133MT/s DDR4 Registered DIMMs at 1.2V operating on a future Intel reference platform. The Kingston HyperX demo will be showcasing the latest HyperX memory that has been validated through Intel's XMP certification process. The demos will be shown using an X79 motherboard and one of Intel's newest Ivybridge E processors. Our 2133 MHz SO-DIMM memory demo will be shown working on a Haswell based notebook. The Microserver demo will be demonstrating 1600 MHz 1.35V low voltage ECC SODIMM memory on an Intel Atom C2000-series “Avoton” microserver. Kingston's ECC SODIMM memory has been validated on the Intel “Edisonville” microserver system, and is posted on Intel's website.

Intel's Avoton System on a Chip (SoCs) is a more powerful chip for use in the microserver market. This chip allows low power machines to handle a broader range of computing workloads. Microservers are quickly gaining in popularity as companies seek powerful, yet more energy- and physical-space efficient solutions that serve specific data center needs or cloud applications. Examples include web and cloud hosting, and big data where terabytes or petabytes of information sets are analyzed per second. Kingston’s low-voltage, high-performing microserver memory modules are the perfect match to help accomplish these tasks.

Kingston is celebrating 25 years in the memory industry. The company was founded on October 17, 1987, and has grown to become the largest third-party memory manufacturer in the world. The 25th anniversary video and information including a timeline of Kingston's history can be found on the anniversary web page. In addition, HyperX memory is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The first HyperX high-performance memory module was released in November 2002.

Source: Kingston