As in comedy, one of the key elements of RAM is the timing

Subject: Memory | September 10, 2012 - 01:06 PM |
Tagged: kingston hyper x, kingston, ddr3-2133, ddr3-1600, DDR-3 2400, DDR-3 1866, DDR-3

X-bit Labs took five DDR3 kits from Kingston to compare in a handy roundup for those looking to see the difference higher frequencies have on a systems performance.  They range from 1600MHz @ 9-9-9-27 to 2400MHz @ 11-13-13-30  and so offer not only a comparison on frequency but also timings.  If you read all the way through you can see how these kits compare at base frequencies as well as when they are overclocked; which may have a somewhat noticeable effect on synthetic benchmarks, but not so much on the real world tests.

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"Today we are going to talk about memory kits from one of the leading DDR3 SDRAM makers for enthusiasts. Our roundup includes such products as Kingston HyperX Genesis KHX1600C9D3K2/8G, Kingston HyperX Genesis KHX1866C9D3K2/8GX, Kingston HyperX T1 KHX1866C9D3T1K2/8GX, Kingston HyperX T1 KHX21C11T1K2/8X and Kingston HyperX T1 KHX24C11T1K2/8X."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: X-bit Labs

GSkill Heard You Like Memory…

Subject: Memory | December 6, 2011 - 08:35 AM |
Tagged: x79, SB-E, Sandy Bridge E, Intel, gskill, DDR-3 2400, DDR-3, bulldozer, amd, am3+, 64 GB

So they are giving us as much, and as fast, as we could possibly handle.  GSkill has announced their latest Ripjaw-Z kits specifically aimed at the latest Intel Socket 2011 chips on the X79 platform.  These kits range from 4 x 8GB @ 2100 speeds with 1.5 v up to 8 x 8GB at 2400 speeds at 1.65 v.  For those wishing to push clock speeds up higher, they offer a 4 x 4GB kit at 2500 speeds at 1.65v as well.

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Red is the new black.  This is what 32 GB of memory looks like now.

The past few months I have been using a few sets of GSkill memory with the latest Llano based chips from AMD.  These are 4 x 4 GB 1866 products that run at 1.5v, and they have been pretty phenomenal for me.  Now that we are moving into new CPU architectures from both manufacturers, memory speeds have become important again.  For quite some time people could easily get by with DDR-3 1333 modules and not experience any kind of performance bottleneck.  The reasons for this were due to CPU designs (quad core CPUs rarely required more than 12 GB/sec of bandwidth in most applications) as well as the non-integrated nature of graphics for the most part.

Read the full post here.

Source: GSkill