Noctua Announces Some New Fans - During a Brownout?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | May 13, 2014 - 11:05 PM |
Tagged: noctua, fans, cpu cooling, case fan

Noctua, well-known Austrian maker of high-performance fans and CPU coolers, announced two new fan product lines today – and there’s something very different about them.

noctua_nf_s12b_redux_5.jpg

Do not adjust your monitor. These fans are in full color (or lack thereof)

Of some interest here is the “redux” line. True to its name, “redux” is a reissue of some of Noctua’s best-know models but with a very different look. Gone is the trademark brown and tan! Noctua also plans on selling these for “3/4 the price” of the standard models.

According to Noctua’s official statement, “the introduction of the two new product lines allows us to respond to the recurring demands for Noctua fans in different colors." So the voices have been heard. (While I personally don’t mind the old color scheme there are certainly people who do!)

The “redux” lineup will include PWM and 3-pin versions of the existing NF-P14, NF-S12B, NF-B9 and NF-R8, in a gray/darker gray color scheme.

So what of this second new product line? That would be the “industrialPPC” fan lineup with high speed offerings for use in “challenging environments” – and Noctua makes mention of “PC enthusiasts striving for extreme performance”. Sounds like these might warrant some overclocking trials...

noctua_nf_ippc_5.jpg

The industrialPPC lineup consists of “ruggedized” 2000 and 3000rpm versions of the NF-F12 and NF-A14 fans, and they feature an all-black color scheme.

Competition is a good thing, and it’s nice to see Noctua diversify their offerings and offer some lower pricing (with the redux line) in this market, though their fans will still demand a premium price.

Check out Noctua’s official announcement for more information including MSRP’s.

Source: Noctua

Introduction: Budget Cooling Options and the Seidon 120V

The Seidon 120V is Cooler Master's newest 120mm all-in-one liquid CPU cooler, and its affordable price adds another option to anyone looking for an aftermarket cooler on a budget. But when we start comparing low-cost options it's valid to wonder just how much better a liquid cooler in this price range might perform over air. To find out we'll test the Seidon 120V against a popular budget air solution, and see how these aftermarket coolers compare against the stock solutions from AMD and Intel.

11_Product_Seidon 120V_front_01.jpg

Image courtesy of Cooler Master

Cooling on a Budget

When you’re pricing out a new computer build these days it’s pretty easy to put together a solid group of components for $500 or so, and these will get you going on all the latest games at HD resolution. Sounds awesome! Of course, within that tight budget certain things are going to have to wait, and right up there on the list is probably some better cooling. It’s easy enough to change out a CPU cooler later, but if the stock cooler is doing the job within the thermal specs of the processor is it really needed? Clearly, AMD and Intel are not going to ship a cooler with their product that can’t keep it cool enough under stock workloads, but having better cooling can allow for overclocking as well as extend the life of not only the CPU, but the components around it on your motherboard. Aftermarket coolers are often able to cool more efficiently as well, producing less noise.

So...many...options...

The selection of aftermarket coolers available is, well, ridiculous. As easy as it is to get lost looking at, say, every virtually identical stick of DDR3 memory, scrolling through product pages for CPU cooling is on another level entirely. Liquid cooling systems are much easier to navigate, as there are not only fewer of them, but the pricing segmentation allows for easier selection if you’re on a budget.  For instance, the Seidon 120V at around $50 was the least expensive AIO option on Amazon when this review was started (actually coming in at 47.99 shipped, though this has been fluctuating quite a bit lately). Finding a suitable budget air cooler was not so easy, and it needed to be at least comparable to the performance of a liquid cooler, while coming in at or below the $50 mark of the 120V. (This might take a while…)

On the air-cooling side of things narrowing the selection to $50 or less doesn’t help much, as there are still (roughly) 50 million to choose from in that price range. There are going to be so many different preferences and opinions on these, so an easier alternative would be to simply follow the consensus pick, e-tail style. This intensive research project involved visiting Amazon and typing “cpu cooler” into the search box. (OK, that was pretty easy!) The plan was to put whatever came up first under $50 in the cart. Turns out the most popular air-cooler is also under $50 (not surprising). This top result was also from Cooler Master, their Hyper 212 EVO which was selling for under $34 shipped. Done.

Continue reading our review of hte Cooler Master Seidon 120V Liquid Cooler!!

Manufacturer: Corsair

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

01-h110-full.PNG

Hydro Series™ H110 Extreme Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
Courtesy of Corsair

03-h90-full.PNG

Hydro Series™ H90 High Performance Liquid CPU Cooler
Courtesy of Corsair

Corsair has upped their presence in the cooling field with the new 140mm fan-based additions to the Hydro Series™ CPU water cooler lineup. Corsair was kind enough to provide us with samples of their H90 and H110 series cooling units, both using 140mm fans. We put these coolers up against their H80i 120mm fan-based unit as well as our custom-built Swiftech Apogee HD cooling system to see how well these new Corsair units performed. Starting at a base price of $99.99 for the Corsair H90 cooler, you can't go wrong with either unit.

04-h110-bare.PNG

Hydro Series™ H110 Extreme Performance CPU Cooler without fans
Courtesy of Corsair

05-h90-bare.PNG

Hydro Series™ H90 High Performance Liquid CPU Cooler without fans
Courtesy of Corsair

Corsair worked with Asetek to design their new 140mm-based line of coolers with the H90 and H110 introduced to enhance their current line of coolers. Both coolers are built using aluminum radiators capable of holding 140mm fans and copper cold plates. The rubber coated tubing used is low permeability 1/4 inch based tubing with multiple layers used to prevent liquid evaporation and to provide maximum tubing flexibility. Unlike their Corsair Link™ based coolers, the Corsair H90 and H110 units do not have integrated LEDs nor the Corsair Link™ based monitoring system.

Silentmaxx TwinBlock HSF Passively Cools 100W CPUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 24, 2012 - 09:58 AM |
Tagged: silentmaxx, passive cooling, hsf, cpu cooling, cooler

 

Having a silent system without fans is a noble goal, but CPUs generally need at least one. A new heatsink from Silentmaxx called the TwinBlock is designed to passively cool processors up to approximately 100W. Supporting sockets 774, 775, 1155, 1156, 1366 on the Intel side and 939, 940, and AMD 2/3 for AMD processors, it is compatible with just about any processor. The TwinBlock is, in a word, massive. Weighting in a just over 3 pounds, the heatsink measures 210mm (B) x 135mm (D) x 160mm (H) mm. It features a copper base with 10 heatpipes that connect to two aluminum fin arrays.

twin_block.jpeg

Interestingly, FanlessTech pointed us to a new computer build – the Fanless I-850 Gamer – that the company is planning to use the passive heatsink with to create a silent gaming PC. The PC can be equipped with up to an Intel Core i7-3960X Sandy Bridge-E processor and up to either an AMD 7970 or NVIDIA GTX 670 graphics card. The processor is cooled using the TwinBlock cooler while the GPUs are using custom coolers that should only kick on the fans over long gaming sessions or folding. The Fanless I-850 starts at 1279,00€ for the base configuration.

It is possible to buy just the heatsink, however. The Silentmaxx TwinBlock cooler can be yours for about $120 USD (€ 99.90 inc. VAT). More photos of the cooler are available below, and you can read more about the cooler on the SilentMaxx website.

 

Source: Fanless Tech