Corning USB 3.Optical Cables Now Available

Subject: General Tech | April 20, 2014 - 03:59 AM |
Tagged: usb 3.0, optical cable, corning

USB 3.Optical is a cable technology by Corning to extend the range of USB 3.0 while maintaining high bandwidth. Like the eventually realized promise of Thunderbolt, the cable is a stretch of fiber-optics between the two end points. The currently available SKU is a 10m male-to-female USB 3.0 A to A cable (a ten meter USB 3.0 extension cord). The idea is that users will plug their intended cable to the female end, as if it were the actual socket on the computer.

corning-usb30.jpg

The cable is actually currently available, right now, on Amazon. The catch? A 10m cable is $110 USD. This is around three-to-four dollars per foot. Needless to say that it is probably a bit too expensive for a "just in case" purchase. However, if you have a significant need for it, a cable now exists. The company also expects to ship 20M and 30M cables at some point this year.

One thing that is not clear is whether these cables are powered. I do not see anywhere which claims that it can transmit power. There is little reason why not, you could fit two extra little wires and put a 5V drop between them pretty easily over those ranges, but I expect that they did not.

Corning USB 3.Optical cables are available now on Amazon although eAccutech seems to be cheaper (I have not heard of the latter but they are mentioned in the Corning press release).

Source: Corning

Intel is releasing a new optical interconnect; this time they totally mean it

Subject: General Tech | August 15, 2013 - 01:52 PM |
Tagged: MXC, Intel, idf, fiber optics, corning

Remember Intel's LightPeak, that optical interconnect which promised incredible throughput that Apple somehow managed to quash?  Thunderbolt is interesting, though certainly expensive and offers only a part of what we were promised at what seems an exorbitant amount of money.  At the upcoming IDF Intel promises to introduce an optical connector which is similar to what LightPeak was although it will be intended for server interconnects as opposed to removable devices.  However at 1.6 Tbps MXC will be impressively fast and Corning's new ClearCurve LW fibre technology will prove to be rugged enough to survive through the bends and snarls which inevitably occur when two or more wires are put in close proximity.  Check out the link to the abstract through ExtremeTech.

fibre.jpg

"Ahead of the Intel Developer Forum next month, Intel and Corning are teasing a new optical interconnect technology capable of 1.6 terabits per second. Dubbed MXC, the interconnect is designed to supercharge the interconnection of servers in data center environments, where current networking technologies are struggling to keep up with the massive growth of cloud computing."

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Source: ExtremeTech

Could Corning have finally made affordable ePaper?

Subject: General Tech | June 5, 2012 - 12:43 PM |
Tagged: video, willow glass, flexible display, corning

Corning has been successfully selling its Gorilla Glass on mobile devices as a much stronger and more durable alternative to other glass or plastic screens.  We have seen flexible OLED devices before now but the cost has always been prohibitive enough to prevent a large consumer release.  By tweaking the process Corning uses to make Gorilla Glass the company is now able to produce sheets of flexible 0.5mm thick Willow Glass a metre across which will help lower production costs.  The Register reports that Corning is confident that their new product will be compatible with touchscreen LCDs and OLEDs and will add flexibility while reducing weight.

"Corning has been showing off a new form of flexible glass that is the thickness of a sheet of paper yet easy to mass-produce.

Dubbed Willow glass, the material can be manufactured to just 0.05mm thickness compared to current 0.2mm or 0.5mm screens, and is suitable for touch control systems and with LCD and OLED displays. The extraordinary flexibility of the glass comes from the materials used to build it and the process by which it is made."

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Source: The Register