Cooler Master Introduces MasterLiquid Maker 92 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 17, 2016 - 11:43 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, MasterLiquid Maker 92, AIO, liquid cooler, self contained, convertible

Cooler Master has introduced an unusual all-in-one liquid CPU cooler with their new MasterLiquid Maker 92, a design which places all of the components together on top of the CPU block.

main.jpg

We've seen a similar idea from Corsair with the cooler first found in the Bulldog system, and later introduced separately as the H5 SF mini-ITX liquid cooler. Cooler Master's design uses a different arrangement, with push-pull 92mm fans sandwiching a radiator that rotates 90º to permit either a verticle or horizontal setup. The latter position allows for better low-profile chassis compatibility, and also adds airflow to motherboard components.

main_2.jpg

Specifications:

  • Model: MLZ-H92M-A26PK-R1
  • CPU: Intel LGA 2011-v3/ 2011/ 1151/ 1150/ 1155/ 1156 socket
  • Power Connector    : SATA and 4-Pin
  • Radiator Material: Aluminum
  • Dimensions: 
  • Vertical: 99.9 x 81.6 x 167.5mm (3.9 x 3.2 x 6.6”)
  • Horizontal: 99.9 x 142 x 118.8 mm (3.9 x 5.6 x 4.7”)
  • Fan:
    • Dimension: Φ95x 25.4 mm (3.7 x 1”)
    • Airflow: 49.7 CFM (max)
    • Air Pressure: 6.4 mmH2O (max)
    • Noise Level: 30 dBA (max)
  • Pump:
  • Noise Level: <12 dBA (max)
  • MTTF: 175,000 hours
  • L-10 Life: 50,000 hours
  • Rated Voltage: 12VDC
  • Warranty: 5 Years

design.jpg

Cooler Master is offer pre-orders on a first-come, first-serve basis beginning August 30 from this page. Pricing is not listed.

Author:
Manufacturer: Cooler Master

Introduction, Features and Specifications

Introduction

1b-Banner-3.jpg

Cooler Master has a long standing and well respected reputation for delivering cases, power supplies, cooling products, and peripherals to the PC enthusiast market. They recently added the MasterBox 5 Series to their formidable case lineup, which includes three models: Black with side window, White with side window, and Black without a side window. The front bezel is also available with or without support for up to two 5.25” external drive bays. The MasterBox 5 fits into Cooler Master’s mid-tower case lineup, which includes nine other product lines and over seventy mid-tower cases in various sizes and colors!

2-MB5x3.jpg

Cooler Master MasterBox 5 Mid-Tower Case

The MasterBox 5 Series incorporates a straightforward design with numerous internal cutouts on the motherboard tray to allow for easy cable routing and flexible drive mounting. The case can accommodate larger, high-end components like tall CPU coolers, extended length graphic cards, and/or liquid cooling systems. The MasterBox 5 case can mount four different sizes of motherboards, ranging from mini-ITX to Extended-ATX and comes with two very quiet 120mm cooling fans preinstalled. Our review sample included a basic configuration of two internal 3.5” HDD bays, one SSD bracket, but no 5.25” external drive bays.

3-Built.jpg

Cooler Master MasterBox 5 Mid-Tower Case Key Features:
•    Mid-Tower ATX enclosure (LxWxH, 500x220x475mm, 19.7x8.7x18.7”)
•    Flexible mounting options for SSDs and HDDs
•    Supports E-ATX, ATX, Micro-ATX and Mini-ITX motherboards
•    Easily removed dust filters on front and bottom panels
•    Two included case fans (120mm intake and 120mm exhaust)
•    Large acrylic side window
•    Included shroud covers PSU and cabling for a clean look
•    (2) USB 3.0, mic and headphone jacks on the top I/O panel
•    Two internal 3.5” HDD / 2.5” SSD trays and one SSD bracket
•    Up to 410mm (16.1”) for long graphic cards
•    Up to 167mm (6.5”) of space for tall CPU coolers
•    Price: $79.99 USD

Please continue reading our MasterBox 5 case review!!!

Cooler Master Releases MasterKeys Pro L and M Keyboards

Subject: General Tech | August 2, 2016 - 05:49 PM |
Tagged: MasterKeys Pro M, Masterkeys Pro L, MasterKeys, LED keyboard, keyboard, gaming keyboard, cooler master, Cherry MX

Cooler Master has released a pair of new gaming keyboards with the MasterKeys Intelligent White series Pro L and Pro M, both of which feature Cherry MX switches and LED backlighting.

cm_k_01.jpg

The keyboards are differentiated by size, with the Pro L a full-sized model, and the Pro M a 90% design. Both feature a hybrid anti-ghosting implementation which begins with 6-key, and automatically switches to N-key rollover if 6+ buttons are pressed simultaniously. A 32-bit ARM Cortex processor is onboard to control all functionality, from macros to illumination.

"The MasterKeys Pro White utilizes the on board memory and processor for its advanced On-the-fly System. LED lighting modes, repeat rate adjustment, multimedia keys, macro recording, combined with four profile keys, enable you to control all aspects of the keyboard right at your fingertips."

cm_k_02.jpg

The Pro L and Pro M are available with Cherry MX Brown, Blue, and Red switches. The USB 2.0-connected keyboard offer a 1000 Hz polling rate, and 1 ms response time.

Full press release after the break.

Cooler Master MasterBox 5, Canada Model because that makes it cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 28, 2016 - 01:57 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, MasterBox 5

The Cooler Master MasterBox 5 is not a small case, at 450x220x440mm it will fit up to eATX motherboards, radiators of up to 280mm on the front, or 360mm with an adapter.  The lower price point means that there is a lack of grommets, however the empty spaces in the backplate allow you a lot of flexibility for cable management and watercooling paths.  The size will also allow you to install any GPU or CPU cooler on the market, not to mention making installation of your system easier.  You can see Modders Inc's full review here.

mb5can18.jpg

"Cooler Master's current chassis line prioritize function and its design aim is to provide users with the flexibility to make any system they want inside. As part of Cooler Master's massive streamlining process beginning from last year, the simplified look is a distillation of what a Cooler Master case is at its core."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Modders Inc

Almost disposable gaming peripherals? Cooler Master's Devastator II mouse and keyboard combo

Subject: General Tech | April 15, 2016 - 02:33 PM |
Tagged: input, cooler master, Devastator II, gaming mouse, gaming keyboard

If you tend to be hard on your mice and keyboards it seems a waste to invest in a $100 device which will end up dead or at least severely injured within a few months.  Cooler Master has come up with a package that just might appeal to you, the $30 Devastator II keyboard and mouse combo.  The mouse has an optical sensor with 1000, 1600 and 2000 DPI levels and six buttons, including the sensitivity adjustment button.  The keyboard is backlit and the  "mem-chanical" switches Cooler Master uses are Cherry MX compatible so you can swap keycaps if you are so inclined.  Drop by Hardware Canucks for a closer look.

1.jpg

"Cooler Master's Devastator II keyboard and mouse combo claims to do the impossible: provide a capable gaming-grade keyboard and mouse in a package that retails for just $30."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Cooler Master's MasterAir Maker 8; big cooler, big price

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 26, 2016 - 01:16 PM |
Tagged: cooler master, masterair maker 8, air cooler

At 758g and standing 135x145x172mm (5.3x5.7x6.8") with the fan installed the MasterAir Maker 8 is not the largest heatsink on the market but it is certainly a solid hunk of metal.  Cooler Master has included a black plastic x-brace with captive screws similar to the mount shipped with the Hyper D92 which will help protect your CPU from cracking, a nice touch for those who choose to invest in this cooler.  The price is steep compared to the competition, at $130 it is priced more like an AIO watercooler than an air cooler so the performance needs to be equally as impressive.  The Tech Report tested it on an i5-6600K against the Nepton 240M and the cooling performance was similar, however the acoustical performance was not.  Read on to learn more about the noises this cooler produced and if it is really worth the price tag.

front34.jpg

"Cooler Master's MasterAir Maker 8 CPU cooler uses a unique base design to pack in more heat pipes than any other cooler we know of in its size class. We put this cooler through our testing gauntlet to see whether more is better."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

CES 2016: New Cooler Master Mechanical Keyboards

Subject: General Tech, Shows and Expos | January 7, 2016 - 11:02 PM |
Tagged: CES, CES 2016, cooler master, mechanical keyboard, RGB LED

Back in September, we mentioned that the CoolerMaster QuickFire XTi was launched worldwide. They have now launched three more keyboards. Two of them have Cherry MX switches and RGB LEDs, while the third uses a supposedly high-quality membrane switch.

coolermaster-2016-cesstuff.jpg

According to The Tech Report at the show, Cooler Master has apparently used their own LED solution, rather than just purchase Cherry MX RGB switches directly. They also say that they needed to change the housing to fit those. The MasterKeys Pro L and S are fairly minimalist keyboards. I assume L stands for long, and S stands for short, because the S is the tenkeyless version of the L (which means it is cut off to the right of the arrow keys).

The Devastator II has switches that Cooler Master calls “Mem-chanical.” They apparently created high-end membrane switches that are supposed to feel like tactile mechanical ones. I guess this means that they were trying to emulate the Cherry MX Brown force curve. This doesn't say what quality the keyboard will end up being, that said, one of the most precise keyboards I've had (according to my straight-edge test) was a Microsoft Media keyboard from the early 2000s.

The Devastator II also has an ambidextrous mouse. Not sure about pricing and availability, though. The Tech Report claims $30, which is right around what the original Devastator costs today.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Asetek Sends Cease and Desist for Water-Cooled GPUs

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 6, 2015 - 11:29 PM |
Tagged: gigabyte, cooler master, asetek, amd

AMD and Gigabyte have each received cease and desist letters from Asetek, regarding the Radeon Fury X and GeForce GTX 980 Water Force, respectively, for using a Cooler Master-based liquid cooling solution. The Cooler Master Seiden 120M is a self-contained block and water pump, which courts have ruled that it infringes on one of Asetek's patents. Asetek has been awarded 25.375% of Cooler Master's revenue from all affected products since January 1st, 2015.

amd-2015-coolermaster-furyxopen.JPG

This issue obviously affects NVIDIA less than AMD, since it applies to a single product from just one AIB partner. On AMD's side, however, it affects all Fury X products, but obviously not the air-cooled Fury and Fury Nano cards. It's also possible that future SKUs could be affected as well, especially since upcoming, top end GPUs will probably be in small packages adjacent HBM 2.0 memory. This dense form-factor lends itself well to direct cooling techniques, like closed-loop water.

gigabyte-2015-waterforce-asetekcoolermaster.jpg

Even more interesting is that we believe Asetek was expecting to get the Fury X contract. We reported on an Asetek press release that claimed they received their “Largest Ever Design Win” with an undisclosed OEM. We expected it to be the follow-up to the 290X, which we assumed was called 390X because, I mean, AMD just chose that branding, right? Then the Fury X launched and it contained a Cooler Master pump. I was confused. No other candidate for “Largest Ever Design Win” popped up from Asetek, either. I guess we were right? Question mark? The press release of Asetek's design win came out in August 2014 while Asetek won the patent case in December of that year.

Regardless, this patent war has been ongoing for several months now. If it even affects any future products, I'd hope that they'd have enough warning at this point.

Source: GamersNexus
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Four High Powered Mini ITX Systems

Thanks to Sebastian for helping me out with some of the editorial for this piece and to Ken for doing the installation and testing on the system builds! -Ryan

Update (1/23/16): Now that that AMD Radeon R9 Nano is priced at just $499, it becomes an even better solution for these builds, dropping prices by $150 each.

While some might wonder where the new Radeon R9 Nano fits in a market that offers the AMD Fury X for the same price, the Nano is a product that defines a new category in the PC enthusiast community. It is a full-scale GPU on an impossibly small 6-inch PCB, containing the same core as the larger liquid-cooled Fury X, but requiring 100 watts less power than Fury X and cooled by a single-fan dual-slot air cooler.

The R9 Nano design screams compatibility. It has the ability to fit into virtually any enclosure (including many of the smallest mini-ITX designs), as long as the case supports a dual-slot (full height) GPU. The total board length of 6 inches is shorter than a mini-ITX motherboard, which is 6.7 inches square! Truly, the Nano has the potential to change everything when it comes to selecting a small form-factor (SFF) enclosure.

IMG_3232.jpg

Typically, a gaming-friendly enclosure would need at minimum a ~270 mm GPU clearance, as a standard 10.5-inch reference GPU translates into 266.7 mm in length. Even very small mini-ITX enclosures have had to position components specifically to allow for these longer cards – if they wanted to be marketed as compatible with a full-size GPU solution, of course. Now with the R9 Nano, smaller and more powerful than any previous ITX-specific graphics card to date, one of the first questions we had was a pretty basic one: what enclosure should we put this R9 Nano into?

With no shortage of enclosures at our disposal to try out a build with this new card, we quickly discovered that many of them shared a design choice: room for a full-length GPU. So, what’s the advantage of the Nano’s incredibly compact size? It must be pointed out that larger (and faster) Fury X has the same MSRP, and at 7.5 inches the Fury X will fit comfortably in cases that have spacing for the necessary radiator.

Finding a Case for Nano

While even some of the tiniest mini-ITX enclosures (EVGA Hadron, NCASE M1, etc.) offer support for a 10.5-in GPU, there are several compact mini-ITX cases that don’t support a full-length graphics card due to their small footprint. While by no means a complete list, here are some of the options out there (note: there are many more mini-ITX cases that don’t support a full-height or dual-slot expansion card at all, such as slim HTPC enclosures):

Manufacturer Model Price
Cooler Master Elite 110 $47.99, Amazon.com
Cooltek Coolcube  
Lian Li PC-O5 $377, Amazon.com
Lian Li PC-Q01 $59.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q03 $74.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q07 $71.98, Amazon.com
Lian Li PC-Q21  
Lian Li PC-Q26  
Lian Li PC-Q27  
Lian Li PC-Q30 $139.99, Newegg.com
Lian Li PC-Q33 $134.99, Newegg.com
Raijintek Metis $59.99, Newegg.com
Rosewill Legacy V3 Plus-B $59.99, Newegg.com

The list is dominated by Lian Li, who offers a number of cube-like mini-ITX enclosures that would ordinarily be out of the question for a gaming rig, unless one of the few ITX-specific cards were chosen for the build. Many other fine enclosure makers (Antec, BitFenix, Corsair, Fractal Design, SilverStone, etc.) offer mini-ITX enclosures that support full-length GPUs, as this has pretty much become a requirement for an enthusiast PC case.

Continue our look at building Mini ITX systems with the AMD Radeon R9 Nano!!

Taming your gaming laptop's heat with CM's NotePal Ergostand III

Subject: Mobile | September 25, 2015 - 05:36 PM |
Tagged: laptop cooler, NotePal Ergostand III, cooler master

We've talked about gaming laptops and the mobile GTX 980 recently on the podcast and mentioned the fact that powerful gaming laptops need help keeping cool.  One product worth considering would be the NotePal Ergostand III from CoolerMaster which has a 230mm adjustable fan covering its backside.  At around $50 it is a decent price for this sort of product and worthy of consideration if you happen to be a gamer who prefers laptops.  You can learn more about it over at Benchmark Reviews.

Cooler-Master-NotePal-Ergostand-III-Back-600x423.jpg

"That’s where notebook coolers come in, such as the Cooler Master NotePal Ergostand III used as our example in this article about keeping hot laptops cool and running fast."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile