Cooler Master Introduces MasterLiquid Maker 92 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 17, 2016 - 11:43 AM |
Tagged: cooler master, MasterLiquid Maker 92, AIO, liquid cooler, self contained, convertible

Cooler Master has introduced an unusual all-in-one liquid CPU cooler with their new MasterLiquid Maker 92, a design which places all of the components together on top of the CPU block.

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We've seen a similar idea from Corsair with the cooler first found in the Bulldog system, and later introduced separately as the H5 SF mini-ITX liquid cooler. Cooler Master's design uses a different arrangement, with push-pull 92mm fans sandwiching a radiator that rotates 90º to permit either a verticle or horizontal setup. The latter position allows for better low-profile chassis compatibility, and also adds airflow to motherboard components.

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Specifications:

  • Model: MLZ-H92M-A26PK-R1
  • CPU: Intel LGA 2011-v3/ 2011/ 1151/ 1150/ 1155/ 1156 socket
  • Power Connector    : SATA and 4-Pin
  • Radiator Material: Aluminum
  • Dimensions: 
  • Vertical: 99.9 x 81.6 x 167.5mm (3.9 x 3.2 x 6.6”)
  • Horizontal: 99.9 x 142 x 118.8 mm (3.9 x 5.6 x 4.7”)
  • Fan:
    • Dimension: Φ95x 25.4 mm (3.7 x 1”)
    • Airflow: 49.7 CFM (max)
    • Air Pressure: 6.4 mmH2O (max)
    • Noise Level: 30 dBA (max)
  • Pump:
  • Noise Level: <12 dBA (max)
  • MTTF: 175,000 hours
  • L-10 Life: 50,000 hours
  • Rated Voltage: 12VDC
  • Warranty: 5 Years

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Cooler Master is offer pre-orders on a first-come, first-serve basis beginning August 30 from this page. Pricing is not listed.

Subject: Systems, Mobile
Manufacturer: Lenovo

Introduction and Specifications

Lenovo made quite a splash with the introduction of the original X1 Carbon notebook in 2012; with its ultra-thin, ultra-light, and carbon fiber-infused construction, it became the flagship ThinkPad notebook. Fast-forward to late 2013, and the introduction of the ThinkPad Yoga; the business version of the previous year's consumer Yoga 2-in-1. The 360-degree hinge was novel for a business machine at the time, and the ThinkPad Yoga had a lot of promise, though it was far from perfect.

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Now we fast-forward again, to the present day. It's 2016, and Lenovo has merged their ThinkPad X1 Carbon and ThinkPad Yoga together to create the X1 Yoga. This new notebook integrates the company's Yoga design (in appearance this is akin to the recent ThinkPad Yoga 260/460 revision) into the flagship ThinkPad X lineup, and provides what Lenovo is calling "the world's lightest 14-inch business 2-in-1".

Yoga and Carbon Merge

When Lenovo announced the marriage of the X1 Carbon notebook with the ThinkPad Yoga, I took notice. A buyer of the original ThinkPad Yoga S1 (with which I had a love/hate relationship) I wondered if the new X1 version of the business-oriented Yoga convertible would win me over. On paper it checks all the right boxes, and the slim new design looks great. I couldn't wait to get my hands on one for some real-world testing, and to see if my complaints about the original TP Yoga design were still valid.

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As one would expect from a notebook carrying Lenovo’s ThinkPad X1 branding, this new Yoga is quite slim, and made from lightweight materials. Comparing this new Yoga to the X1 Carbon directly, the most obvious difference is that 360° hinge, which is the hallmark of the Yoga series, and exclusive to those Lenovo designs. This hinge allows the X1 Yoga to be used as a notebook, tablet, or any other imaginable position in between.

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Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga (base configuration, as reviewed)
Processor Intel Core i5-6200U (Skylake)
Graphics Intel HD Graphics 520
Memory 8GB LPDDR3-1866
Screen 14-in 1920x1080 IPS Touch (with digitizer, active pen)
Storage 256GB M.2 SSD
Camera 720p / Digital Array Microphone
Wireless Intel 8260 802.11ac + BT 4.1 (Dual Band, 2x2)
Connections OneLink+
Mini DisplayPort
HDMI
3x USB 3.0
microSD
Audio combo jack
Dimensions 333mm x 229 mm x 16.8mm (13.11" x 9.01" x 0.66")
2.8 lbs. (1270 g)
OS Windows 10 Pro
Price $1349 - Amazon.com

Continue reading our review of the Lenovo ThinkPad X1 Yoga Notebook!!

Author:
Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: Huawei

A new competitor has entered the arena!

When we first saw the announcement of the MateBook in Spain back in March, pricing was immediately impressive. The base model of the tablet starts at just $699; $200 less than the lowest-priced Surface Pro 4, with features and performance that pretty closely match one another.

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The MateBook only ships with Core m processors, a necessity of the incredibly thin and fanless design that Huawei is using. That obviously will put the MateBook behind other tablets and notebooks that use the Core i3/i5/i7 processors, but with a power consumption advantage along the way. Honestly, the performance differences between the Core m3 and m5 and m7 parts is pretty small – all share the same 4.5 watt TDP and all have fairly low base clock speeds and high boost clocks. The Core m5-6Y54 that rests in our test sample has a base clock of 1.1 GHz and a maximum Turbo Boost clock of 2.7 GHz. The top end Core m7-6Y75 has a base of 1.2 GHz and Boost of 3.1 GHz. The secret of course is that these processors run at Turbo clocks very infrequently; only during touch interactions and when applications demand performance.

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If you work-load regularly requires you to do intensive transcoding, video editing or even high-resolution photo manipulation, the Core m parts are going to be slower than the Core i-series options available in other solutions. If you just occasionally need to use an application like Photoshop, the MateBook has no problems doing so.

Huawei MateBook Tablet PC
MSRP $699 $849 $999 $1199 $1399 $1599
Screen 12-in 2160x1440 IPS
CPU Core m3 Core m3 Core m5 Core m5 Core m7 Core m7
GPU Intel HD Graphics 515
RAM 4GB 8GB
Storage 128GB 256GB 256GB 512GB 256GB 512GB
Network 802.11ac MIMO (2.4 GHz, 5.0 GHz)
Bluetooth 4.1
Gigabite Ethernet (MateDock)
Display Output HDMI / VGA (through MateDock)
Connectivity USB 3.0 Type-C
3.5mm headphone
USB 3.0 x 2 (MateDock)
Audio Dual Digital Mic
Dual Speakers
Weight 640g (1.41 lbs)
Dimensions 278.8mm x 194.1mm x 6.9mm
(10.9-in x 7.6-in x 0.27-in)
Battery 33.7 WHr
Operating System Windows 10 Home / Pro

Update: The Huawei Matebook is now available on Amazon.com!

At the base level, both the Surface Pro 4 and the MateBook have identical specs, but the Huawei unit is priced $200 lower. After that, things get more complicated as the Surface Pro 4 moves to Core i5 and Core i7 processors while the MateBook sticks with m5 and m7 parts. Storage capacities and memory size scale though. The lowest entry point for the MateBook to get 256GB of storage and 8GB of memory is $999 and comes with a Core m5 processor; a comparable Surface Pro 4 uses a Core i5 CPU instead but will run you $1199. If you want to move from 256GB to 512GB of storage, Microsoft wants $400 more for your SP4, while Huawei’s price only goes up $200.

Continue reading our review of the Huawei MateBook convertible PC!!

CES 2016: Lenovo Announces Yoga 900 Business Edition

Subject: Systems, Mobile | January 3, 2016 - 10:30 PM |
Tagged: yoga 900, yoga, notebook, Lenovo, laptop, convertible, CES 2016, CES, 2-in-1

Lenovo has unveiled a new Business Edition of the Yoga 900 2-in-1 notebook, which adds a TPM (Trusted Platform Module) security chipset for those that require the added security. Lenovo points out that “large enterprises rank security features even higher than ease of use”, and if you require TPM it’s nice to have a user-friendly option like the Yoga available.

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“The YOGA 900 Business Edition is instantly recognizable as something different. Always a step ahead by testing perceptions of what a laptop should be, the YOGA 900 delivers the performance you need to work and play in any situation: LAPTOP, STAND, TENT and TABLET modes. The ultimate blend of personal desires and work requirements.”

The notebook features a 3200 x 1800 (QHD+) display which Lenovo says they have “tuned for brighter & more vibrant images”, and is powered by 6th gen Intel Core processors.

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Here is a rundown of the key features from Lenovo:

  • 2.9lbs and 0.58” thick
  • Up to Intel 6th Gen Core i7 vPro
  • QHD+ (3200 x 1800) IPS display
  • Up to 512GB SSD
  • Up to 16GB memory
  • TPM security chipset

Pricing was not revealed, and the YOGA 900 Business Edition will be available by special order beginning in February.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Lenovo

CES 2016: Lenovo Announces ThinkPad X1 Yoga with OLED Screen

Subject: Systems, Mobile | January 3, 2016 - 10:30 PM |
Tagged: yoga, ThinkPad X1 Yoga, Thinkpad, Lenovo, convertible, CES 2016, CES, 2-in-1

Lenovo has brought the Yoga design to the ThinkPad X1 Carbon with the Yoga X1, and this new hybrid notebook is available with an OLED display.

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“The worlds first convertible with an OLED display providing an immersive viewing experience. The X1 Yoga adapts to the way you work - allowing you to capture, convey and collaborate using the different modes.”

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A convertible version of the ultra-thin X1 Carbon offers a compelling alternative to the standard "clamshell" ThinkPad X1 Carbon, but the bigger story might be the option of a 2560 x 1440 OLED display, a first for a convertible notebook according to Lenovo. The OLED screen was incredibly vibrant in person, and this version is actually a little lighter at 2.8 lbs vs. 3 lbs for the IPS model.

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The ThinkPad X1 Yoga also includes an active stylus that features a super capacitor instead of a battery, which Lenovo says provides 2 hours of constant use after charging for just 15 seconds (which occurs when it is placed back in the laptop).

Specifications from Lenovo:

  • Up to Intel 6th Gen Core i7 vPro
  • Intel HD Graphics HD520
  • WQHD touch display 2560x1440
  • Optional 14” OLED 2560x1440 WQHD Touch 300 nits; 14” 1920x1080 FHD IPS Touch 300 nits; 14” WQHD 2560x1440 IPS Touch 300nits
  • Up to 16GB memory
  • Up to 1TB PCIe NVMe SSD
  • Optional LTE-A WWAN; Optional WiGig docking
  • MilSpec tested
  • Common Ports: 3xUSB3.0 OneLink+ (RJ45), MiniDP, HDMI, microSD, Audio, Touch FPR, WWAN
  • Onboard Stylus Pen
  • Dimensions: 13.1 x 9.0 x .66 inches
  • 2.8 lbs (OLED)/3 lbs (IPS)

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Pricing starts at $1449 for the version with an IPS display, and $1649 for the OLED version. The ThinkPad Yoga X1 will be available this month - but you'll need to wait until April for that OLED version.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Lenovo

Lenovo Introduces the Ultra-Thin Yoga 900 Convertible Laptop

Subject: Systems, Mobile | October 20, 2015 - 05:55 AM |
Tagged: Lenovo, yoga 900, convertible, 2-in-1, laptop, notebook, Intel Core i7, QHD+

Lenovo has introduced their latest Yoga convertible notebook, and this one isn’t just thinner and lighter – it’s 14.9 mm thick and weighs just 2.8 lbs – Lenovo claims that it’s the world’s thinnest Intel Core i-series laptop. And the improvements don’t stop with the external design, as Lenovo has upgraded virtually every aspect of the Yoga.

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First off, 14.9 mm (0.59 inches) would be slim for a thin-and-light notebook anyway, but the Yoga’s thinness is even more impressive considering its 2-in-1 convertible design. The unique hinge mechanism is part of what allows Lenovo to keep such a slim profile, and this aspect has also been revised with a new version of the “watch band” hinge for the Yoga 900 that Lenovo says offers smoother movement than before.

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So what’s new under the hood? The latest Intel 6th generation processors to start with, and here are more of the specs:

  • Processor: Up to 6th Generation Intel Core i7
  • Display: 13.3" QHD+ (3200 x 1800) IPS, 300 nits
  • Graphics: Integrated Intel HD Graphics
  • Memory: Up to 16 GB LP-DDR3L
  • Storage: Up to 512 GB Samsung SSD
  • WLAN: 2x2 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.0
  • Ports: 2x USB Type A 3.0, 1x USB Type C 3.0 with video out, 1x DC-in with USB 2.0 function, Audio Combo Jack
  • Card Reader: 4-in-1 (SD, MMC, SDXC, SDHC)
  • Webcam: 1MP 720p HD CMOS Camera
  • Audio: JBL Stereo Speakers with Dolby DS 1.0 Home Theater Certification
  • Battery: 4 Cell 66 Wh Li-Polymer, up to 9 hours battery life
  • Operating System: Windows 10 Home
  • Dimensions (W x D x H): 12.75" x 8.86" x 0.59" (324 x 225 x 14.9 mm)
  • Weight: Starting at 2.8 lbs (1.3 kg)

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In keeping with the Yoga name this laptop features a 360-degree hinge design, allowing virtually limitless possibilities for using the machine. This new Yoga also features a battery with much greater density than before – 50% more, according to Lenovo – and a revised cooling system that provides up to 30% better cooling as well as quieter performance.

The Yoga 900 starts at $1199, but the base models will differ in specs depending on where you look. Best Buy seems to have the better deal as they will offer a unit at the introductory price featuring a Core i7-6500u processor, while Lenovo’s base model has an i5-6200u for the same $1199 price. Both versions feature 8 GB of memory, and a 256 GB SSD.

Source: Lenovo

What's hot in the mobile segment right now

Subject: Mobile | July 17, 2015 - 04:29 PM |
Tagged: roundup, recommedations, tablet, convertible, laptop, gaming laptop, smartphone

Wondering what is hot in the mobile world right now?  Well, you can see what The Tech Report thinks are the best mobile computing devices in their latest round up right here.  They have four recommended tablets, ranging from the low cost Google Nexus 7 which is still a hit after years on the market to the much more expensive and brand new iPad Air 2.  Of the convertibles they recommend, two happen to be Surface machines from Microsoft and they split up their laptop recommendations between those for general usage and two designed specifically for gaming.  Rounding out the list are four phones and a look at what is coming down the pipeline in the near future; what you won't find are any Chromebooks.

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"In this edition of our mobile staff picks, we chose our favorites from the current cream of the crop in tablets, convertibles, laptops, and phones."

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

Mobile

It's the Post-Post-PC Era! (I can do it, too! :3)

Subject: General Tech | August 6, 2014 - 06:58 PM |
Tagged: best buy, tablets, convertible, laptop

Hubert Joly, CEO of Best Buy, talked with Re/code about the overall health of their company and various industry trends. The first question (at least in the order Re/code presented them) asked about the decline of the PC industry. He responded that PC sales are actually recovering, to some extent, but that Android tablets are, now, "crashing".

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His view is that laptops are adopting the successful bits of the tablet market, especially as a result of various two-in-one initiatives. He believes students, in particular, appreciate tablet/laptop hybrids. This is certainly what Intel has been hoping for, through its recent Ultrabook efforts. He hopes that innovation will be done at the high end, so consumers will not simply settle for the $300-tier.

He did back off on his "crashed" statement, regarding the tablet market, however. The growth of tablets, from the start, were amazing. However, like the argument with "good enough" PCs, there does not seem to be a compelling argument for users to move to the next device, at least not yet. Like PCs, devices are being replaced, just not driven from industry forces. Also, like smartphones, the market seems to have matured, slowing in growth.

Naturally, Joly believes that Best Buy will be around for years to come. I agree with his reasoning. He acknowledges the squeeze between online resellers and boutique shops, which puts Best Buy in an awkward middle niche when the goal of a big box store is to be not niche. My interpretation of his strategy is to, instead of being crushed, strive to overlap. Embrace what the customers want on either side while doing your thing in the middle.

It is still questionable whether it will work, but it seems like the right move.

Source: Re/code
Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: Lenovo

Introduction and Design

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The next candidate in our barrage of ThinkPad reviews is the ThinkPad Yoga, which, at first glance, might seem a little bit redundant.  After all, we’ve already got three current-gen Yoga models to choose from between the Yoga 2 11- and 13-inch iterations and the Yoga 2 Pro top-end selection.  What could possibly be missing?

Well, in fact, as is often the case when choosing between well-conceived notebook models, it isn’t so much about what’s missing as it is priorities.  Whereas the consumer-grade Yoga models all place portability, slimness, and aesthetics in the highest regard, the ThinkPad Yoga subscribes to a much more practical business-oriented approach, which (nearly) always instead favors function over form.  It’s a conversation we’ve had here at PC Perspective a thousand times before, but yet again, it is the core ThinkPad philosophy which separates the ThinkPad Yoga from other notebooks of its type.  Suffice it to say, in fact, that really the only reason to think of it as a Yoga at all is the unique hinge design and affiliated notebook/tablet convertibility; excepting that, this seems much closer to an X240 than anything in Lenovo’s current consumer-grade lineup.  And carrying a currently-configurable street price of around $1,595 currently, it’s positioned as such, too.

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But it isn’t beyond reproach.  Some of the same questionable decisions regarding design changes which we’ve covered in our recent ThinkPad reviews still apply to the Yoga.  For instance, the much-maligned clickpad is back, bringing with it vivid nightmares of pointer jumpiness and click fatigue that were easily the biggest complaint about the T440s and X240 we recently reviewed.  The big question today is whether these criticisms are impactful enough to disqualify the ThinkPad Yoga as a rational alternative to other ThinkPad convertibles and the consumer-grade Yoga models.  It’s a tall order, so let’s tackle it.

First up, the specs:

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While most of this list is pretty conventional, the astute might have already picked out one particular item which tops the X240 we recently reviewed: a possible 16 GB of dual-channel RAM.  The X240 was limited to just 8 GB of single-channel memory thanks to a mere single SODIMM slot.  The ThinkPad Yoga also boasts a 1080p screen with a Wacom digitizer pen—something which is clearly superior to our X240 review unit.  Sadly missing, however, are the integrated Gigabit Ethernet port and the VGA port—and the mini DisplayPort has been replaced by a mini-HDMI, which ultimately is decidedly inferior.

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Continue reading our review of the Lenovo ThinkPad Yoga!!!

HP Launches Bay Trail-Powered X360 Convertible Laptop

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | February 26, 2014 - 09:20 PM |
Tagged: x360, Windows 8.1, tablet, hp, convertible tablet, convertible, Bay Trail

At MWC 2014, HP showed off an interesting convertible laptop similar in form factor to Lenovo's Yoga lineup. The HP X360 is a Bay Trail-powered laptop running Windows 8.1 that brings the 360-degree hinged hybrid laptop/tablet form factor to an affordable $460 price point. The red plastic and brushed aluminum PC is available for purchase now and will begin shipping in early March.

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HP's new X360 tablet measures 12.12” x 8.46” x 0.86” and weighs in at a portable 3.08 pounds. It is noticeably larger than other Bay Trail tablets like the ASUS T100 and Dell Venue series, but it also has an integrated keyboard and trackpad attached via a permanently attached double hinge to the 11.6” LED-backlit touchscreen with a resolution of 1366x768. The chassis is a glossy red plastic while the keyboard cover and palm rest use a brushed aluminum surface that surrounds a large gesture compatible touchpad and a chiclet-style keyboard that appears to be well spaced for an 11.6” machine (excluding the arrow keys which are bunched up in the bottom-right corner in order to allow full sized shift and enter keys). A silver chassis version is also in the works, but will not be available until later this year.

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The HP X360 features external I/O more akin to a traditional laptop than a tablet with the following connectivity options.

  • 1 x USB 3.0
  • 2 x USB 2.0
  • 1 x HDMI
  • 1 x RJ45 (10/100 Ethernet)
  • 1 x headphone/mic combo jack
  • 1 x SD card slot
  • 1 x SIM card slot

Internally, the HP X360 uses an Intel Pentium N3520 processor, 4GB or 8GB of RAM, a 500GB hard drive, 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth radios, and a 2 cell Lithium Ion battery rated for up to four and a half hours of use. HP has further packed its tablet with Beats Audio technology. Interestingly, the Pentium N3520 CPU is a quad core chip based on Intel's Bay Trail (Atom) architecture which uses Silvermont cores and Intel HD graphics. The CPU is clocked at 2.166 GHz base and 2.42 GHz Turbo with 2MB of cache.

The X360 can be used as a laptop or a tablet in several configurations by swinging the display around appropriately. It is very similar to Lenovo's Yoga system, though HP is using a slightly different hinge design.

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The real advantage of the HP X360 is its price. At a starting price of $389 for the 4GB model, the X360 is much cheaper than the (admittedly more powerful) Yoga alternatives while still being a capable machine for note taking and media consumption. It lies in a middle ground between Bay Trail-powered tablets and Haswell-powered laptops. For an $80 premium over the ASUS T100, users get a more traditional convertible PC with more storage (albeit slower mechanical storage) and a faster clocked processor.

Personally, I'm tempted and have been debating between this and the T100 as a second portable machine to replace my aging Dell XT with comparably abysmal battery life (heh).

You can find more information on the new X360 (HP Pavilion 11t-n000 x360 PC) on this HP product page.

Source: HP