Computex 2014: Corsair's Flash Voyager GTX USB

Subject: General Tech, Storage, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: usb 3.0, thumb drive, ssd, flash drive, corsair, computex 2014, computex

The Flash Voyager GTX is Corsair's attempt to be an SSD over USB 3.0. Differentiating itself from a standard USB flash drive, the Voyager GTX includes TRIM support, S.M.A.R.T. monitoring, and interfaces with USB Attached SCSI. It also comes in two, SSD-sized capacities, 128GB ($119.99) and 256GB ($199.99). These drives are rated at 450MB/s read and 350MB/s write.

FVGTX_open.png

This pricing structure puts the Voyager GTX against the Samsung 840 Pro, which is an interesting comparison to make. Both drives are backed by a five (5) year warranty and, while the 840 Pro has higher read bandwidth, the write speeds are fairly comparable. IOPS and write durability is not listed for the Corsair Flash Voyager GTX but, even if they are marginally behind, this has the advantage of USB.

Benchmarking should be interesting for this. I would be curious if this could lead to portable OS installations and abrupt boosts to Steam library sizes, both with SSD-like speeds.

The Corsair Flash Voyager GTX USB 3.0 drives will be available in July. The 128GB version has an MSRP of $119.99, while the 256GB is listed at $199.99.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: Corsair

Computex 2014: Corsair's Cherry MX RGB Keyboards Launch

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2014 - 07:01 AM |
Tagged: computex, Computer 2014

Cherry MX RGB key switches were teased since December but not yet made into a product. They generated interest by integrating red, green, and blue LEDs that, together, are capable of glowing any one of 16 million colors. Each key can even glow its own color and brightness independently, allowing users to color certain zones, with animation, if desired. Corsair had a year of exclusivity over this switch with their line of keyboards which they have done nothing with, so far.

Today, they announce that MX RGB switches will be available in four models:

  • K70 RGB Red, available in late July ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K70 RGB Blue, available in late August ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K70 RGB Brown, available in late August ($169.99 MSRP)
  • K95 RGB Red, available in late August ($189.99 MSRP)

If you happen to have wanted Cherry MX Blue or Brown, you will be looking at the K70 because the K95 RGB will only be available in Cherry MX RGB Red. Of course, that could change in future announcements but, even still, the main difference is the 18 macro keys. Honestly, though I have had several keyboards which offer these, I have never used mine. Then again, I also do not play MMOs or MOBAs so judge for yourself whether the extra keys are deal breakers.

VENG_K95_RGB_K_US_top.png

Corsair Vengeance K95 RGB

As usual, Corsair puts a lot of thought into their keyboards. Each one is based on an NKRO matrix which provides "100% anti-ghosting" (rant: more precisely, the keyboard is built well enough that it physically cannot ghost to require anti-ghosting). Even their first generation design aced my grueling test, where I spam the equivalent of several hundred words per minute as input and compare it to what the keyboard believes.

VENG_K70_RGB_K_US_top.png

Corsair Vengeance K70 RGB

Also announced, the M65 RGB Gaming Mouse. RGB LED lighting on a mouse is not as novel, but it will match your keyboard. That will be available late August for $69.99 MSRP.

All devices will come with a two (2) year warranty, which definitely gives confidence to someone considering peripherals in this price point.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: Corsair

Computex 2014: ASUS PA328Q 60Hz, Professional 4K Panel

Subject: General Tech, Displays | June 2, 2014 - 03:20 AM |
Tagged: pq321q, PA328Q, displays, display, computex 2014, computex, asus, 4k

You might remember the ASUS PQ321Q 4K monitor from last year that we loved. It was based on an IGZO panel and allowed for 60Hz via one DisplayPort 1.2 cable, running in Multi Stream Transport (MST). At Computex 2014, ASUS announced the PA328Q. This "ProArt" panel ships calibrated and offers 10-bit, 100% sRGB color representation. More interestingly, it supports HDMI 2.0 as well as DisplayPort 1.2, for 4K at 60Hz, apparently over a single cable.

asus-pa328q-fixed.jpg

The monitor also has an extra mini DisplayPort connector and two HDMI 1.4 inputs. Also, four (4) USB 3.0 ports and a headphone jack. I guess professionals like high-speed removable storage.

Some points that I would like to see clarified are:

  1. its Adobe RGB coverage (for printer color spaces)
  2. its panel type (I expect IGZO)
  3. and its pricing (and availability)...

I do not know how this fits in to the ASUS product stack, relative to the $3500 PQ321Q. It includes more modern connections and could hit the checkboxes for digital content creation at 4K. Its price might give us an idea about where it stands... or it might just blow our minds, one way or the other. For now, I don't know.

For more Computex 2014 coverage, please check out our feed!

Source: ASUS

Computex 2013: Noctua Heatsinks. Late, "Cool" Story

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 22, 2013 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: noise cancellation, noctua, computex 2013, computex

Update (June 22-2013, 4:43pm EDT): I was contacted by Noctua about the TDP ratings... quoting from their email:

As for the question regarding the TDP rating of the original NH-D14, I'd like to stress that the cooler can *easily* handle any 130W CPU! Our D14 is renowned to be among the best performing heatsinks for overclocking on the market and and many users have pushed their CPUs well beyond 250W using this cooler.

Noctua apparently does not like including TDP values for their coolers because it varies heavily on the conditions (such as, of course, room and case temperature). It makes sense, of course, because then customers would go looking at reviews and see what overclocks were achieved with the system.

***

Yes, I know Computex is long over, but I missed something that I want to cover.

Noctua has been teasing active noise cancellation (ANC) for their CPU coolers for quite some time now; Tim published his brief thoughts, 13 months ago, on their press release leading up to Computex 2012. The prototype, this year, is a full unit rather than the fan from last year.

This design is a modified NH-D14 cooler with added technology from RotoSub AB to sample its own noise and destructively interfere. According to Noctua, this will be the first ANC cooling unit for a CPU. The plan, as their press release suggests, is to release a cooler with the model named "R-ANC" after its (R)otoSub (A)ctive (N)oise (C)ancellation (R-ANC) technology. To me, this seems like a confusing choice in name as it breaks away from their existing standard and limits choice in name for future models based on this technology. Personally, I would have preferred to see "NH-D14R" or "NH-D14ANC", but alas I am not a marketer.

Also, in the process of researching for this article, I have been unable to find a canonical TDP-rating for this device. I was not too surprised to have a difficult time finding it for this unreleased product, but TDP is even omitted from the established, albeit louder, default NH-D14. Some sources claim this cooler can support an Intel i7 Extreme processor, which typically requires a 130W thermal dissipation; other sources say you should be somewhat cautious with this cooler with CPUs >95W TDP; some even claim it is great for air-only overclocking. Rolling all of these sources together, assuming a kernel of truth in each, I would assume this cooler (and, by extension, its upcoming R-ANC variant) would be good for decent air-only overclocks until you reach the -E series.

But, grain of salt, have some.

No word of pricing, but Noctua believes they will have it available spring/summer of next year. For some reference, the default NH-D14 can be found for about $75-$100; expect the R-ANC to be slightly north of that.

Source: Hardcoreware

Computex 2013: The Comedic Return of the Ultra GPUs

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Graphics Cards, Shows and Expos | June 10, 2013 - 02:49 AM |
Tagged: Ultra, geforce titan, computex

So long to Computex 2013, we barely knew thee. You poured stories all over our news feed for more than a whole week. What say you, another story for the... metaphorical road... between here... and... Taipei? Okay, so the metaphorical road is bumpy and unpaved, work with me.

It was substantially more difficult to decipher the name of a video card a number of years ago. Back then, products would be classified by their model numbers and often assigned a suffix like: "Ultra", "Pro", or "LE". These suffixes actually meant a lot, performing noticeably better (or maybe worse) than the suffix-less number and possibly even overlapping with other number-classes.

colorful-gtx-titan-ultra-edition,B-V-387931-13.png

Image Credit: zol.com.cn via Tom's Hardware

Just when they were gone long enough for us to miss them, the suffixes might make some measure of a return. On the show floor, Colorful exhibited the NVIDIA GeForce GTX Titan Ultra Edition. This card uses a standard slightly-disabled GK110-based GeForce GTX Titan GPU, with the usual 2688 CUDA cores, and 6GB of GDDR5. While the GK110 chip has potential for 2880 CUDA cores, NVIDIA has not released any product (not even Tesla or Quadro) with more than 2688 CUDA cores enabled. Colorful's Titan Ultra and the reference Titan are electrically identical; this "Ultra" version just adds a water block for a cooling system and defaults to some amount of a factory overclock.

But, this is not the first time we have heard of a Titan Ultra...

Back in April, ExtremeTech found a leak for two official products: the GTX Titan LE and the GTX Titan Ultra. While the LE would be slightly stripped down compared to the full GTX Titan, the GTX Titan Ultra would be NVIDIA's first release of a GK110 part without any CUDA cores disabled.

So if that rumor ends up being true, you could choose between Colorful's GTX Titan Ultra with its partially disabled GK110 based on the full GTX Titan design; or, you could choose the reference GTX Titan Ultra based on a full GK110 GPU unlike the partially disabled GK110 on the full GTX Titan.

If you are feeling nostalgic... that might actually be confusion... as this is why suffixes went away.

Computex 2013: New Haswell-Ready PSUs From SeaSonic Pictured

Subject: General Tech, Cases and Cooling, Shows and Expos | June 7, 2013 - 03:56 PM |
Tagged: seasonic, PSU, m12II evo, m12II bronze, haswell, computex 2013, computex

Following Intel's announcement of new Haswell sleep states, various power supply manufacturers have released compatibility lists detailing which PSUs are able to deliver the low load necessary to support the power sipping sleep states on the 12V rail (which has not been much of a concern until Haswell).

One such PSU manufacturer was Seasonic, who has quite a few Haswell-ready power supplies across several lineups including its Platinum, G, and M12II series, among others. Included in that compatibility list were two new power supplies that Seasonic is showing off at Computex this week: the Seasonic Platinum 1200 and Seasonic M12II Bronze Evo Edition.

SeaSonic Platinum 1200

The Platinum 1200 is a high-end modular power supply that is capable of powering beefy multi-GPU setups. It is 80+ Platinum rated and is up to 92% efficient at 50% load.

Platinum 1200.jpg

Sesonic M12II Bronze Evo Edition

The Seasonic M12II Bronze Evo Edition is an updated version on past models and includes two SKUs that come in at 750W and 850W. It is a fully modular unit with flat black cables and fan control tech. It is 80+ Bronze and Energy Star rated, and is compatible with Intel's 4th Generation Core processors.

M12II 850 Evo Edition PSU.jpg

Also read: The full list of Haswell-compatible Seasonic power supplies @ PC Perspective.

Source: SeaSonic

Computex 2013 / E3 2013: Unreal Engine 4 Partners Program

Subject: Editorial, General Tech, Shows and Expos | June 6, 2013 - 05:42 PM |
Tagged: unreal engine 4, ue4, E3 13, E3, computex

We are bleeding through the overlap between Computex and E3 media windows; this news has a somewhat relevant fit for both. Unreal Engine 4 is coming and I expect we will see one or more demos and UE4-powered titles over the next week. In fact, I would be fairly shocked if we do not see the end of the Elemental Demo with the Xbox One E3 keynote. We may also potentially see Unreal Engine 4 running on mobile devices and maybe even HTML5 at some point throughout the tradeshow, either canonically through Epic or via a licensee product.

This morning, Epic opened the Unreal Engine 4 Integrated Partners Program (IPP). Of course they already have a couple of members, most of which were partners with Unreal Engine 3.

The founding IPP partners are:

  • Wwise from Audiokinetic
    • Manages large databases of sound effects and voice-overs
    • Manages subtitles and multiple dubbings of voice clips
  • Autodesk Gameware from Autodesk
    • Contains multiple packages including Beast, Navigation, and Scaleform
    • Scaleform is a Flash rendering engine for HUDs, menus, etc. developed using Flash Professional in 2D or 3D. It is what StarCraft II, Mass Effect, and Borderlands uses.
    • Beast is a lighting toolkit for global illumination, radiosity, etc.
    • Navigation is an AI solver, predominantly for pathfinding.
  • Simplygon from Donya Labs
    • Reduces polygon count of models so they take up less processing resources especially as they get further away from the camera.
  • Enlighten from Geomerics
    • Another Global Illumination solver, most popular usage being Battlefield 3.
  • SpeedTree for Games from IDV
    • Makes a bunch of efficient trees so studios do not need to hire as many minimum wage peons.
  • Intel Threading Building Blocks (TBB) from Intel
    • Helps developers manage C++ threading for multicore systems.
    • Deals with memory management and scheduling tasks
  • morpheme from NaturalMotion
    • Animation and physics software for designers to create animations
    • Works with NVIDIA PhysX
  • euphoria from NaturalMotion
    • Simulates animations based on driving conditions via the CPU, most popular usage being GTA IV.
  • PhysX and APEX from NVIDIA
    • You probably know this one.
    • GPU-based rigid body, soft body, fluid, and cloth solvers.
    • Allows for destructible environments and other complex simulations.
  • Oculus Rift from Oculus VR
  • Bink Video from Rad Game Tools
    • ... is not included! Just kidding, that stuff'll survive a nuclear apocalypse.
    • Seriously, check in just about any DirectX or OpenGL game's credits if it includes pre-rendered video cutscenes or video-textures.
    • I'll wait here.
    • In all seriousness, Rad Game Tools has been licensed in over 15,500 titles. It's been a meme to some extent for game programmers. This should be no surprise.
  • Telemetry Performance Visualizer from Rad Game Tools
    • Allows developers to see graphs of what their hardware is working on over time.
    • Helps developers know what benefits the most from optimization.
  • RealD Developer Kit (RDK) from RealD
    • Helps game developers create stereoscopic 3D games.
  • Umbra 3 from Umbra Software
    • Determines what geometry can be seen by the player and what should be unloaded to increase performance.
    • Sits between artists and programmers to the former does not need to think about optimization, and the latter does not need to claw their eyes out.
  • IncrediBuild-XGE from Xoreax
    • Apparently farms out tasks to idle PCs on your network.
    • I am not sure, but I think it is mostly useful for creating a pre-render farm at a game studio for light-baking and such.

We still have a little while until E3 and so we do not know how E3 will be, but I highly expect to see Unreal Engine 4 be a recurring theme over the next week. Keep coming back to PC Perspective, because you know we have a deep interest in where Epic is headed.

Source: Epic Games

Computex 2013: Intel Demos Baytrail Tablet, Haswell Ultrabook, Ivy Bridge Passive Tablet

Subject: Processors, Mobile | June 6, 2013 - 04:01 PM |
Tagged: computex, computex 2013, Intel, haswell, Ivy Bridge, k900, Lenovo, baytrail, silvermont, ultrabook, acer, aspire s7

Intel had a host of new technologies to show off at Computex this year, starting of course with the Haswell processor launch.  Hopefully you have read our review of the Core i7-4770K LGA1150 CPU already but thanks to some video sent our way, we have other interesting bits to share.

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Below you will see Intel demonstrating four new products.  First is the Acer Aspire S7 using a Haswell dual-core platform playing back 4K content.  Next up is an Ivy Bridge tablet that is running completely fanless (passive) thus generating no noise at all while still offering impressive CPU and graphics performance.  Intel then pulls a Lenovo K900 Android smartphone out of its pocket powered by the Clovertrail+ enabled Atom Z2580 SoC.  Finally, we get a sneak peak at the next-generation of SoC designs with a look at a Silvermont-based Baytrail tablet running at 2560x1440. 

Podcast #254 - NVIDIA GTX 770, Haswell and Z87 Reviews, AMD Richland APUs and ton of Computex news!

Subject: General Tech | June 6, 2013 - 01:42 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, haswell, gtx 770, amd, Richland, nvidia, computex, asus, Transformer, 4k

PC Perspective Podcast #254 - 06/06/2013

Join us this week as we discuss the NVIDIA GTX 770, Haswell and Z87 Reviews, AMD Richland APUs and ton of Computex news!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, Allyn Malventano and Morry Teitelman

Program length: 1:41:16

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
    1. Jeremy: Something I have to test for work
  3. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  4. Closing/outro

 

Computex 2013: EVGA Shows Off Latest MiniBox Chassis With Support For High End GPUs

Subject: Cases and Cooling | June 6, 2013 - 10:31 AM |
Tagged: evga, minibox, mini-itx, gtx titan, gk110, gaming, computex, computex 2013

First shown off at CES 2013, the EVGA Minibox is a small form factor chassis for Mini-ITX systems that can accommodate large graphics cards. EVGA has managed to enable users to pack a lot of hardware into this tiny form factor chassis. As a demonstration of the case's capabilities, the company showed off the latest version using a full system build with Core i7-4770K and GTX TITAN interals at Computex this week in Taipei.

The Minibox chassis itself is a dark brushed metal case with two USB 3.0 ports on the front IO and space for a slot loading optical drive. The MiniBox chassis further features a motherboard tray that supports Mini-ITX boards, two 2.5" SATA hard drive bays – and best of all – enough room to install full size GPUs. In order to support lengthy graphics cards, EVGA is including a small form factor 500W power supply that is mounted on the floor of the case..

HEXUS Spots EVGA Minibox At Computex 2013.jpg

HEXUS reporters spot the EVGA Minibox at Computex 2013. Look how small it is!

There will be at least two SKUs of the Minibox, depending on whether you want to go with air or water cooling. According to Bit-Tech.net, the air cooled version will use two 92mm fans in the top of the case and one 80mm fan for the bottom-mounted PSU. The water cooled SKU will be slightly larger but have enough room for a water cooling radiator (likely 240mm). Beyond that, details are scarce, but the air cooled version is said to be available as soon as next month with water cooled options becoming available later this year.

The Minibox looks to be one of the better Mini-ITX cases out there (although the price is still unknown), and should be popular among enthusiasts wanting a small box that does not sacrifice gaming potential.

Source: HEXUS