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Tagged: ces 2013, CES

Hardware is still key

The show is over, but CES 2013 is still taking its affect on our feet and our minds.  While the feet are healing I asked our team to give me a few stories that would summarize this year's show.  What stood out and surprised us and really made an impact?  Below are a handful of quick selections with links to the full stories, but if you really want the full CES 2013 experience, you should check out our stream of CES news at http://pcper.com/ces.

 

NVIDIA Tegra 4 / Shield

CES really kicked off with the announcement of Tegra 4 and Shield, an Android-powered mobile gaming system built off the company's newest SoC.  Shield combines a 5-in touch screen, Tegra 4 processor, console-quality game controller, speakers, display output support and more in a small, battery powered package.  They are promising the best Android gaming experience as well as the ability to stream PC games on your home network to Shield.

Check out our hands-on video with the device as well as some other information on the Tegra 4.

 

AMD APU Relevance

To be honest, not much was expected from AMD at the show this year but they surprised many of us by talking about new APUs that looked to be much more relevant in the market than we thought they would be.  Kaveri will be shipping before the end of the year and will be the first full HSA ready part, Kabini will be a high performance quad-core SoC for ultrathin notebooks and Temash could be a beast in the tablet and hybrid space.

Continue reading our wrap up from CES 2013!!

CES 2013: Intel Haswell HD Graphics Compared to GeForce GT 650M

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 12, 2013 - 12:02 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, Intel, hd graphics, haswell, geforce, dirt 3, ces 2013, CES, 650m

While wandering around the Intel booth we were offered a demo of the graphics performance of the upcoming Haswell processor, due out in the middle of 2013.  One of the big changes on this architecture will be another jump up in graphics performance, even more than we saw going from Sandy Bridge to Ivy Bridge. 

haswell1.jpg

On the left is the Intel Haswell system and on the right is a mobile system powered by the NVIDIA GeForce GT 650M.  For reference, that discrete GPU has 384 cores and a 128-bit memory bus so we aren't talking about flagship performance here.  Haswell GT3 graphics is rumored to have double the performance of the GT2 found in Ivy Bridge based on talks at IDF this past September. 

While I am not able to report the benchmark results, I can tell you what I "saw" in my viewing.  First, the Haswell graphics loaded the game up more slowly than the NVIDIA card.  That isn't a big deal really and could change with driver updates closer to launch, but it is was a lingering problem we have seen with Intel HD graphics over the years. 

haswell2.jpg

During the actual benchmark run, both looked great while running at 1080p and High quality presets.  I did notice during part of the loading of the level, the Haswell system seemed to "stutter" a bit and was a little less fluid in the animation.  I did NOT notice that during the actually benchmark gameplay though. 

I also inquired with Intel's graphics team about how dedicated they were to providing updated graphics drivers for HD graphics users.  They were defensive about their current output saying they have released quarterly drivers since the Sandy Bridge release but that perhaps they should be more vocal about it (I agree).  While I tried to get some kind of formal commitment from them going forward to monthly releases with game support added within X number of days, they weren't willing to do that quite yet. 

If AMD and NVIDIA discrete notebook (and low cost desktop) graphics divisions are to push an edge, game support and frequent updates are going to be the best place to start.  Still, seeing Intel continue to push forward on the path of improved processor graphics is great if they can follow through for gamers!

Coverage of CES 2014 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2014 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

CES 2013: Caustic, now part of Imagination, Shows Series2 Ray Tracing Accelerators

Subject: Graphics Cards, Shows and Expos | January 12, 2013 - 11:38 AM |
Tagged: series2, ray tracing, imagination, ces 2013, CES, caustic

We have talked with Caustic on several occassions over the past couple of years about their desire to build a ray tracing accelerator.  Back in April of 2009 we first met with Caustic, learning who they were and what the goals of the company were; we saw early models of the CausticOne and CausticTwo and a demonstration of the capabilities of the hardware and software model. 

While at CES this year we found the group at a new place - the Imagination Technologies booth - having been acquired since we last talked.  Now named the Caustic Series2 OpenRL accelerator boards, we are looking at fully integrated ASICs rather than demonstration FPGAs. 

caustic1.jpg

This is the Caustic 2500 and it will retail for $1495 and includes a pair of the RT2 chips and 16GB of memory.  One of the benefits of the Caustic technology is that while you need a lot of memory, you do not need expensive, fast memory like GDDR5 used in today's graphics cards.  By utilizing DDR2 memory Imagination is able to put a whopping 16GB on the 2500 model.

caustic2.jpg

A key benefit of the Caustic ray tracing accelerators comes with the simply software integration.  You can see above that a AutoDesk Maya 2013 is utilizing the Caustic Visualizer as a simple viewport into the project just as you would use with any other RT or preview rendering technique.  The viewport software is also available for 3ds max. 

There is a lower cost version of the hardware, the Caustic 2100, that uses a single chip and has half the memory for a $795 price tag.  They are shipping this month and we are interested to see how quickly, and how eager developers are, to utilize this technology.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

The post-CES news hangover

Subject: General Tech | January 11, 2013 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: ces 2013, CES

As Ryan and the CES contingent recover from Las Vegas, along with the other tech sites, the news continues to flow with those items from CES that there just wasn't enough time to cover.  The Tech Report has quite a few new posts this morning, such as Western Digital's reinvention of the HDD with SSD cache called SSHD which uses software tools in addition to the firmware caching that the first generation of cached drives had.  They talked with someone in the know who confirmed that Broadwell will indeed be soldered onto boards and that Haswell can compete with NVIDIA's mobile GPUs.  From AMD they had a peek at the 15W Kabini APU as well as Richland,  while Micron, Crucial and OCZ all showed off new flash based storage devices.

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"Another day, another fresh batch of CES coverage. Today's stories include the scoop on Crucial's next-generation M500 SSD, new details about AMD's Kabini APU, and a look at Intel's Haswell graphics demo. We also have some inside information on Intel's plans for soldered-on Broadwell CPUs, plus more from AMD, Nvidia, Western Digital, OCZ, and Cooler Master."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

CES: 2013 TCL Shows Off Massive 110" 4K China Star 3D LCD Television

Subject: General Tech | January 11, 2013 - 10:48 AM |
Tagged: ultra hdtv, UHD, tcl, ces 2013, CES, 4k

Ultra HD televisions were a popular item at CES 2013, and Chinese manufacturer TCL was not about to be left out of the party. It showed off a massive 110” China Star 3D 4K LCD television that will be featured in Marvel’s upcoming Iron Man 3 film. The 110” Ultra HD TV features a 4K resolution LED backlit-LCD display, active 3D technology, dynamic backlighting, and an 800 nits brightness rating. Reportedly, the TV also has mutli-touch input which likely means that it has support for applications.

TCL 110-inch China Star 4K LCD TV.jpg

Engadget managed to snap a photo of this massive 4K television

At 110” the China Star TV would be impressive for a 1080p panel, but with its 4K resolution it is sure to make explosions and car chases look amazing! Unfortunately, there is no word on pricing, or if it will ever come to the United States. This seems to be more of a proof-of-concept TV where the experience and technologies used to develop it will be rolled out into future generations of TVs that will actually be available to consumers. It is one stepping stone on the way to affordable 4K (eventually), and that's a good thing. You can find TCL's full press release here.

Read more about Ultra HDTVs including NHK's 145" 8K plasma TV at PC Perspective.

4K UHD TV News:

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget

CES 2013: Qualcomm Launches Snapdragon 600 and Snapdragon 800 SoCs

Subject: Mobile | January 11, 2013 - 09:05 AM |
Tagged: SoC, qualcomm 800, qualcomm 600, qualcomm, krait, ces 2013, CES, arm, adreno 330, adreno 320

Qualcomm introduced two new high end mobile processors at CES earlier this week. Known as the Snapdragon 600 and Snapdragon 800, the new SoCs take the company’s Krait CPU cores to the next level. Both of the new chips are based on a 28nm HPm manufacturing process and feature faster (and more efficienct) CPU and GPU portions.

Qualcomm-Snapdragon-SoC.jpg

The Qualcomm Snapdragon 600 is SoC with four Krait 300 CPU cores clocked at 1.9GHz along with an Adreno 320 GPU, and 4G LTE modem. The Snapdragon 600 also supports LPDDR3 RAM. The Adreno 320 GPU features suport fro OpenGL ES 3.0, OpenCL, and Renderscript Compute technologies. According to Qualcomm, the Snapdragon 600 is 40% faster than the Snapdragon S4 Pro processor used in devices like the Google Nexus 4 smartphone. Also, the Adreno 320 GPU is up to 3-times faster than the previous-generation A225.

The Snapdragon 600 SoC is inteded for smartphones, and we should start to see the new processor shipping with new devices by Q2 2013.

Meanwhile, the Snapdragon 800 processor takes performance up yet another notch over the company’s existing chips. The new SoC includes four Krait 400 CPU cores clocked at 2.3GHz, an Adreno 330 GPU, support for 2x32-bit LPDDR3 at 800MHz (12.8Gbps), and a 4G LTE modem. The chip also features two image signal processors (ISP) that can handle up to four cameras and 55MP (total) resolution. Devices with the Snapdragon 800 processor will be able to record 1080p30 video as well as encode and decode stored videos with up to 4K resolutions. As far as wireless, the Snapdragon 800 includes a 4G LTE modem and 802.11ac Wi-Fi. The upcoming SoC can handle 4K video output and HD audio in the form of DTS-HD, Dolby Digital+, and 7.1 Surround Sound.

The Adreno 330 GPU in the Snapdragon 800 chip also supports OpenGL ES 3.0, OpenCL, and Rednderscript Computer technologies. It can output 4K video and reportedly offers up to twice the compute performance versus the Adreno 320 GPU in the Snapdragon 600 processor.

According to Qualcomm, the Snapdragon 800 processor as a whole is up to 75% faster than the Snapdragon S4 Pro SoC. Qualcomm is aiming this processor at “premium” high end devices including Smart TVs, tablets, consumer electronics devices (ie: blu ray players with apps), and smartphones. Qualcomm expects to see devices powered by the new SoC become available sometime around the middle of 2013 (1H’13).

The new chips appear to offer up some noticeable performance and efficiency improvements over the current generation of Snapdragon processors. The Snapdragon 800 in particular is an impressive-sounding design. I am interested to see how it stacks up against competing chips such as NVIDIA’s Tegra 4, Samsung’s next-gen Exynos lineup, and whatever chip Apple has up its sleeve for the next iPad/iPhone refresh. This year is shaping up to be an exciting year for ARM-based SoCs!

If you are interested in the new silicon, Qualcomm has teased a few more details on its blog.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Qualcomm

CES 2013: Monoprice Launches Cheap 2560x1440 IPS Monitor

Subject: General Tech | January 10, 2013 - 04:50 PM |
Tagged: monoprice, LG, korean monitor, display, ces 2013, CES, 1440p

Monoprice is now selling 1440p monitors with LED-backlit IPS displays for $390. They are proving a hot item though as they are already back-ordered to March 2nd!

Last year, many enthusiasts and tech writers learned of high resolution monitors with IPS displays available from Korea for a relative pittance compared to the usual $700+ price tag placed on IPS monitors sold in the US. The Korean panels were manufactured by LG and were panels that did not quite make the cut to be used in Apple’s Cinema displays. Instead of letting the panels go to waste, various Korean companies used the still-high quality panels in their own rebranded monitors. Crossover, Achieva, and Yamakasi (and others) all produce IPS monitors with 2560 x 1440 resolution and LED backlighting. The panels are still of good quality and while the monitors generally lack on screen controls and scaling hardware (and analog inputs), the price more than makes up for those shortcomings.

In order to get the cheap monitors though enthusiasts have traditionally had to turn to ebay and deal with third parties in Korea who purchase the monitors there and ship them to the US. Some US companies have since started offering cheap 1440p rebranded monitors of their own, but ebay remained the cheapest way to grab a Korean monitor.

 

Monoprice 1440p LED IPS monitor (2).jpg

It seems that Monoprice is looking to change that by introducing a new high resolution monitor of its own with the 27” IPS LED CrystalPro. It offers a LED-backlit IPS display with a resolution of 2560 x 1440 for $390.60. It has a 6ms response time and 178-degree viewing angle (horizontal and vertical). The monitor supports dual link DVI inputs and uses an external AC power supply. The CrystalPro montior reportedly uses 65W while in use and 1W in standby mode. Further, the 1440p monitor comes with a VESA mount and included table stand that can tilt.

Monoprice 1440p LED IPS monitor (1).jpg

The real value here comes from the fact that it is sold by a US retailer and ships within the US. It comes with a 1 year limited warranty and 30 day money back guarantee. Monoprice will replace your monitor if it has more than 5 dead pixels--a policy that is not spectacular (though all monitor manufactures have similar policies) but within reason considering the price. Monoprice has stated that it is using the same LG panels as the Achieva Shimian and other popular Korean imports.

Unfortunately, the Monoprice CrystalPro is currently on back order, and new units are not expected to be available until at least March 2, 2013. However, if you have been wary about ordering one off of ebay and are currently using a 1080p TN panel the Monoprice offering might just be worth the wait!

Interested in 1440p IPS monitors? Check out our full review of the Achieva Shimian monitor at PC Perspective.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Monoprice

CES 2013: Ice Computer shows off xPad and modular xPC

Subject: Systems | January 10, 2013 - 03:54 PM |
Tagged: xpc, xpad, xdock, modular computer, ice computer, ces 2013, CES

Engadget caught up with Ice Computer on the CES show floor to check out the progress on its modular xPC system. At Computex last year, the company had a prototype of the xPC, and now at CES Ice Computer has both the xPC and the dockable tablet display to demonstrate.

The xPC is a small plastic chassis containing a full computer sans display or traditional outputs. It weights approximately 50 grams and is similar in form factor to a thick cell phone. It will slide into the xPad tablet dock like a gaming cartridge on a classic (wow, I feel old) console. The xPC can also be docked into a xTop dock which connects to a television or desktop monitor along with a keyboard and mouse.

The xPC in question can use either an Intel Atom, AMD APU, or NVIDIA Tegra processor. It also hosts 2GB of RAM, up to a 64GB SSD, 1.3 or 2 megapixel webcam, and 802.11 b/g/n Wi-Fi radio. It will cost around $200.

Ice Computer xPad.jpg

The xPad is essentially a tablet chassis, touchscreen display, and IO ports that has a slot where the xPC docks. The xPad gets it’s processing and storage guts from the xPC meaning it cannot be used on its own. The current xPad design has a capacitive touch display with a resolution of 1366 x 768, front facing webcam, and an estimated six to eight hours of battery life. The right side of the tablet is a USB port, SD card slot, and a headphone jack. Along the left edge is the power button and volume rocker, and slot for the xPC to dock. Ice Computer expects the xPad tablet dock to be available around the same time as the xPC for $200.

The xTop will come out sometime after the xPC and xPad with an as-yet-unknown price.

The xPC is somewhat interesting in its goal, but I worry that its execution will be its undoing. Ice Computer wants the xPC to be your only computer, such that you take it everywhere and simply dock it into various devices to get more IO, a larger display, or a physical keyboard. Unfortunately, people are already carrying around a computer everywhere and it has a display and longer battery life all its own: the modern smartphone. Android, and in the future Ubuntu, smartphones can be connected to displays along with physical keyboards and mice to access a full desktop. They can be placed into docks, and in the Asus version can even be docked into a larger slate tablet (the PadPhone). I can’t shake the feeling that the xPC has a noble goal but while it is sitting in development uncertainty (there is scant information online about Ice Computer and while progress is being made, release dates are far in the future, for the tech world anyway) the xPC is being surpassed by the increasingly-popular smartphones. (Even Josh has a smartphone now!)

Further, with systems like the Raspberry Pi, enthusiasts can alreay hack together their own dockable, portable computer (expect maybe the tablet aspect) for less than even the base xPC much less the additional docks needed to make ti work.

With that said, Ice Computer’s xPC has one saving grace and that is to cater to Windows users. It could very well be a decent dockable computer that runs Windows and its plethora of applications and legacy software. The various smartphones and mini ARM-powered PCs cannot run Windows, so the xPC could carve out a niche for itself in that area. Not quite the revolutionary dockable dream, but an area where i could see it being viable.

Here’s hoping it sees the light of day sometime this year and reviewers can see it in action.

What do you think about the xPC and it’s goals? 

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Engadget

CES 2013: Canonical Shows Off Ubuntu OS For Smartphones

Subject: Mobile | January 10, 2013 - 03:22 PM |
Tagged: ubuntu for phones, ubuntu, linux, ces 2013, CES, canonical

Ubuntu_Scopes.jpg

Earlier this month Canonical showed off a new version of its Ubuntu operating system intended for mobile phones. The Ubuntu for smartphones operating system is meant to extend the Ubuntu UI and UX to the smartphone screen. Canonical wants its OS to span from servers to phones and Ubuntu for phones is the latest step in that plan.

While there is no official hardware yet, the new operating system will be aimed at both low-end and high-end smartphones alike. It will support the standard array of smartphone functions–phone, sms, email, web browsing, and apps–along with the familiar Ubuntu user interface that is navigated by touch gestures. Ubuntu for phones will run on x86 and ARM hardware and is compatible with the Android Board Suppot Package. That means that users can actually run Ubuntu on many existing smartphones which are currently running Google's Android OS. Unlike Android, there is no Java VM, and the Ubuntu for phones operating system can run both HTML5 and native applications. At CES, Canonical demonstrated the OS using a Galaxy Nexus smartphone.

Ubuntu OS for Smartphones_launcher.jpg

Ubuntu smartphones will feature a familiar Unity-like user interface with a number of tweaks to make it easier to navigate using a touchscreen. The OS will use a feature called Edge Magic, which includes swipe gestures inwards from each side of the phone to open applications, read notifications, change settings, and return to the home screen. Users can also use voice and text commands to control the smartphone. For example, users can swipe left to open the application launcher, drag from the left side to the right side of the screen to display all currently running apps, and drag up from the bottom to open application-specific settings. Swiping from the right acts as the 'back' function while dragging down from teh top opens the notifications and device-wide settings. There are no hardware buttons with Ubuntu for smartphones, and Canonical founder Mark Shuttlework has stated that keeping UI elements hidden until needed was a priority with Ubuntu for phones.

Ubuntu OS for Smartphones_keyboard.jpg

Ubuntu for phones is aimed at a wide range of smartphone hardware. On the low end, Ubuntu needs at least a dual-core ARM Cortex A9, 1GB of RAM, and 4GB of internal storage. The budget smartphones will run native apps (ideally) faster than similar code on Android due to the apps being closer to the hardware. Multitouch will be supported but the destkop functionality when the phone is docked is not available. On the other hand, high end smartphones will be able to access a full Ubuntu desktop when the phone is docked along with a mouse and keyboard. 

Additional features of Ubuntu for smartphones include global search of applications, content, and products, Deep Content Immersion, and personalized artwork on the welcome (lock) screen. Further, Ubuntu One cloud storage, enterprise management tool compatibility, and regular updates are also rolled into the operating system. Ubuntu does include scopes which are similar in function and aesthetics to desktop Ubuntu. The scopes include a list of applications, contacts, videos, and music (among others).

The following chart lists the recommended/referrence specifications for budget and premium smartphones running the Ubuntu mobile OS.

  Entry Level High End
SoC dual core Cortex A9 quad core Cortex A9 or better
RAM 1GB preferred minimum of 1GB
Storage 4-8GB eMMC + SD card min 32GB eMMC + SD card
Display Resolution WVGA 800x400 720p or 1080p
Multi-Touch Yes Yes
Desktop No Yes
Convergence No Yes

Interestingly, users of the Galaxy Nexus smartphone will be able to test drive Ubuntu for smartphones later this year by flashing their device with the new OS. As far as retail hardware with Ubuntu pre-installed, Canonical is reportedly working on developing partnerships with handset makers. Canonical hopes to being shipping devices begining in Q4'13 or Q1'14.

From the various video demonstrations of the Ubuntu for smartphones operating system, it appears extremely slick and user friendly. Curiously, Canoncial was not willing to let CES attendees go hands-on with the reference phone, which may mean that the operating system is not quite ready for prime time. Despite that hesitation, I do think that Ubuntu for smartphones shows a lot of promise as a mobile, touchscreen-controlled operating system.

It is certainly a project that I will be following closely. With the untimely hardware failure of my Nokia N900, I am in need of a new power user-friendly smartphone. And an Ubuntu-powered mobile sounds like the perfect upgrade for me!

What do you think about Canonical's latest venture?

ModdEverything checks out Ubuntu running on a smartphone at CES 2013.

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Canonical

CES 2013: Prototype Intel TV System Spotted at Imagination Suite

Subject: Systems | January 10, 2013 - 02:16 PM |
Tagged: CES, ces 2013, Intel, tv, intel media, imagination, PowerVR

While visiting with the folks at Imagination, responsible for the graphics system known as PowerVR found in many Apple and Samsung SoCs, we were shown a new, innovative way to watch TV.  This new system used an impressively quick graphic overlay, the ability to preview other channels before changing to them and even the ability to browse content on your phone and "toss" it to your TV. 

inteltv2.jpg

The software infrastructure is part of the iFeelSmart package but the PowerVR team was demonstrating the performance and use experiences that its low power graphics system could provide for future applications.  And guess what we saw was connected to the TV?

inteltv1.jpg

With all of the information filtering out on Intel's upcoming dive into the TV ecosystem, it shouldn't be a surprise that find hardware like this floating around.  We aren't sure what kind of hardware Intel would actually end up using for the set top box expected later this year, but it is possible we are looking at an early development configuration right here. 

Coverage of CES 2013 is brought to you by AMD!

PC Perspective's CES 2013 coverage is sponsored by AMD.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!