Upgrade your selfies to the next level with these new products announced at IDF

Subject: General Tech | September 15, 2014 - 03:00 PM |
Tagged: idf 2014, sony, Panasonic, Samsung, cameras

At IDF there were a few new cameras on display which caught The Register's attention in amongst the smart appliances and other gadgets.  For the highest quality selfies try the Panasonic HX-500 4K activity cam which is good at depths of up to 3 metres for up to 30 minutes.  Perhaps you would prefer to pair your Galaxy Note 4 with the Samsung Galaxy VR headset to give you an Occulus like look at the world; a 96-degree view which is intended to look like a 175-inch screen seen from 2 metres away.   Samsung users could also pick up the Olloclip for Android, giving you fisheye and wide angle lenses for your Galaxy S4 or S5.  There is more in the article, check them all out here.

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"Image is everything - or so it has been said, and if the gadgets at the recent IFA techfest in Berlin are anything to go by then manufacturers certainly seem to think we’re image obsessed. With selfies being a global compulsion, perhaps they know us better than we know ourselves."

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Background

Over the past few weeks, I have been developing a device that enables external control of Wirecast and XSplit. Here's a video of the device in action:

But now, let's get into the a little bit of background information:

While the TriCaster from NewTek has made great strides in decreasing the cost of video switching hardware, and can be credited with some of the rapid expansion of live streaming on the Internet, it still requires an initial investment of about $20,000 on the entry-level. Even though this is down from around 5x or 10x the cost just a few years ago for professional-grade hardware, a significant startup cost is still presented.

This brings us to my day job. For the past 4 years I have worked here at PC Perspective. My job began as an intern helping to develop video content, but quickly expanded from there. Several years ago, we decided to make the jump to live content, and started investing in the required infrastructure. Since we obviously didn't need to worry about the availability of PC Hardware, we decided to go with the software video switching route, as opposed to dedicated hardware like the TriCaster. At the time, we started experimenting with Wirecast and bought a few Blackmagic Intensity Pro HDMI capture cards for our Canon Vixia HV30 cameras. Overall, building an 6 core computer (Core i7-980x in those days) with 3 capture cards resulted in an investment of about $2500.

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Advantages to the software route not only consisted of a much cheaper initial investment, we had an operation running for about a 1/10th of the cost of a TriCaster, but ultimately our setup was more expandable. If we had gone with a TriCaster we would have a fixed number of inputs, but in this configuration we could add more inputs on the fly as long as we had available I/O on our computer.

Click here to continue reading about this project!

Kodak Files Chapter 11, Looks To Bankruptcy For Protection

Subject: General Tech | January 20, 2012 - 01:24 AM |
Tagged: kodak, chapter 11, bankrupt, restructure, patents, cameras, photography

Eastman Kodak company has been on the rocky edges financially for some time and late last year there were rumors that Kodak would be filing for bankruptcy. Well, it looks like the company's financial position is now official, as they have filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy and are working to restructure their US operations and become profitable. The company has paired with Lazard, FTI Consulting Inc and Sullivan & Cromwell to assist them in shaving down their business into a lean, mean, picture capturing machine. Under their Chapter 11 filing, Kodak will work to bolster liquidity by trimming down the business to its core and monetizing their "non-strategic intellectual property." The IP likely will involve Kodak selling off some of their non-core patents for imaging. After all, they have a catalog of 1,100 patents, so they definitely have plenty of room to work with in monetizing their assets.

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According to Tom's Hardware, since 2003 the company has shut down 13 manufacturing plants, 130 processing facilities, and shed 47,000 workers. Further, to help with the restructuring process, they have obtained $950 million debtor-in-possession loan through Citigroup that will mature in 18 months. This should give the company enough cash to tide them over while they restructure and prepare to sell off certain assets. Kodak states that "Kodak aims to build company that will be successful in the marketplace – and a positive force in the communities we call home." It is important to note that the non-U.S. based operations of Kodak are not affected by the Chapter 11 bankruptcy filing.

Kodak has set up a web page to detail their restructuring efforts.

Source: Kodak