Intel brings Iris Pro Graphics to Broadwell in LGA Sockets

Subject: Processors | March 19, 2014 - 05:00 PM |
Tagged: LGA, iris pro, Intel, gdc 14, GDC, Broadwell

We have great news for you this evening!  The demise of the LGA processor socket for Intel desktop users has been great exaggerated.  During a press session at GDC we learned that not only will Intel be offering LGA based processors for Broadwell upon its release (which we did not get more details on) but that there will be an unlocked SKU with Iris Pro graphics implemented.  

broadwell.jpg

Iris Pro, in its current version, is a high performance version of Intel's processor graphics that includes 128MB of embedded DRAM (eDRAM).  When we first heard that Iris Pro was not coming to the desktop market with an LGA1150 SKU we were confused and bitter but it seems that Intel was listening to feedback.  Broadwell will bring with it the first socketed version of Iris Pro graphics!

It's also nice to know that the rumors surrounding Intel's removal of the socket option for DIY builders was incorrect or possibly diverted due to the reaction. The enthusiast lives on!!

UPDATE: Intel has just confirmed that the upcoming socketed Broadwell CPUs will be compatible with 9-series motherboards that will be released later this spring. This should offer a nice upgrade path for users going into 2015.

It's not a rumour; Broadwell is still making itself pretty

Subject: General Tech | February 13, 2014 - 10:26 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Broadwell

There are many possible reasons why Intel is delaying the arrival of the 14nm Broadwell, from a lack of competition to the slowing of the laptop market to simply wanting to sell more Haswell chips.  Regardless of the cause, DigiTimes is reporting that we will not see the first Broadwell chips until the beginning of 2015 with the arrival of Celeron and Pentium branded chips.  The first ones to be shipped will be to mobile system builders in the last quarter of this year, limited amounts of U- and Y-series models will be distributed to manufacturers to be sold at the beginning of 2015.  That is a long way off, don't give up all hope but don't hold your breath.

Broadwell-CPU-Intel.jpg

"Intel's upcoming 14nm Broadwell-based processors were previously scheduled for mass production at the end of the first quarter for release in the third; however, sources from the upstream supply chain say the processors have recently been delayed and will not be available until the fourth quarter."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Intel Broadwell-EP Xeon E5 v4 Because Why Not?

Subject: General Tech, Processors | December 16, 2013 - 06:17 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-EP, Broadwell-EP, Broadwell

Intel has made its way on to our news feed several times over the last few days. The ticking and the tocking seem to be back on schedule. Was Intel held back by the complexity of 14nm? Was it too difficult for them to focus on both high-performance and mobile development? Was it a mix of both?

VR-Zone, who knows how to get a hold of Intel slides, just leaked details about Broadwell-EP. This product line is predicted to replace Haswell-EP at some point in the summer of 2015 (they expect right around Intel Developer Forum). They claim it will be Intel's first 14nm Xeon processor which obviously suggests that it will not be preceded by Broadwell in the lower performance server categories.

intel-broadwellep.png

Image Credit: VR-Zone

Broadwell-EP will have up to 18 cores per socket (Hyper-Threading allows up to 36 threads). Its top level cache, which we assume is L3, will be up to 45MB large. TDPs will be the same as Haswell-EP which range from 70W to 145W for server parts and from 70W to 160W for workstations. The current parts based on Ivy Bridge, as far as I can tell, peak at 150W and 25MB of cache. Intel will apparently allow Haswell and Broadwell to give off a little more heat than their predecessors. This could be a very good sign for performance.

VR-Zone expects that a dual-socket Broadwell-EP Xeon system could support up to 2TB of DDR4 memory. They expect close to 1 TFLOP per socket of double precision FP performance. This meets or exceeds the performance available by Kaveri including its GPU. Sure, the AMD solution will be available over a year earlier and cost a fraction of the multi-thousand-dollar server processor, but it is somewhat ridiculous to think that a CPU has the theoretical performance available to software render the equivalent of Battlefield 4's medium settings without a GPU (if the software was written with said rendering engine, which it is not... of course).

This is obviously two generations off as we have just received the much anticipated Ivy Bridge-E. Still, it is good to see that Intel is keeping themselves moving ahead and developing new top-end performance parts for enthusiasts and high-end servers.

Source: VR-Zone

Intel Broadwell to Reach 3.5W and Other Details!

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | December 14, 2013 - 01:07 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Broadwell

This leak is from China DIY and, thus, machine-translated into English from Chinese. They claim that Broadwell is coming in the second half of 2014 and will be introduced in three four series:

  • H will be the high performance offerings
  • U and Y have very low power consumption
  • M will fit mainstream performance

The high performance offerings will have up to four CPU cores, 6MB of L3 cache, support for up to 32GB of memory, and thermal rating of 47W. The leak claims that some will be configurable down to 37W which is pretty clearly its "SDP" rating. The problem, of course, is whether 47W is its actual TDP or, rather, another SDP rating. Who knows.

Intel-logo.svg_.png

The H series is said to be available in either one or two chips.  Both a separate PCH and CPU version will exist as well as a single-chip solution that integrates the PCH on-die.

There is basically nothing said about the M series beyond acknowledging its existence.

The U and Y series will be up to dual-core with 4MB L3 cache. The U series will have a thermal rating of 15W to 28W. The Y series will be substantially lower at 4.5W configurable down to 3.5W. No clue about which of these numbers are TDPs and which are SDPs. You can compare this earlier reports that Haswell will reach as low as 4.5W SDP.

Hopefully we will learn more about these soon and, perhaps, get a functional timeline of Intel releases. Seriously, I think I need to sit down and draw a flowchart some day.

Source: China DIY

Linux support for Broadwell is looking good

Subject: General Tech | November 4, 2013 - 10:28 AM |
Tagged: Intel, linux, open source, Broadwell

Over the weekend 62 patches to the Linux kernel were released, enabling Broadwell GPU support well ahead of the processors scheduled release date.  Not only is this great news for open source enthusiasts who appreciate it when large companies like Intel release detailed driver code but also means that Broadwell should function well with Linux on its release date.  Phoronix also reports that more code is scheduled to arrive this week to enable other features which are unique to Broadwell, keep your eyes peeled for any specifications we can infer from the code as it becomes available

ph_image.php_.jpg

"While Intel's Broadwell processors won't be launching until 2014 as the successor to Haswell, this weekend the initial open-source Linux GPU kernel driver was published ahead of the Linux 3.13 kernel merge window. The changes are massive and it's looking like the Broadwell graphics improvements will be astonishing and provide significant improvements over Haswell and earlier generations of Intel graphics."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Phoronix

Intel 2014 Desktop "Roadmap": Broadwell-K Late 2014?

Subject: General Tech, Processors | October 28, 2013 - 04:21 PM |
Tagged: Intel, Haswell-E, Broadwell-K, Broadwell

Ivy Bridge-E was confirmed for this holiday season and Haswell-E was proclaimed to follow in Holiday 2014 bringing good tidings of comfort and joy (and DDR4). Broadwell, the Haswell architecture transitioned to a 14nm process technology, was expected to be delayed until at least 2015 because it was not on any roadmap before that.

broadwell-k.png

Image credit: VR-Zone China

Until recently when something called "Broadwell-K" popped up slated for late Holiday 2014.

VR-Zone China, the site which broke this story (machine translated), cautiously assumes Broadwell-K signifies the platform will first arrive for the mainstream enthusiast. This would align with Intel's current "K" branding of unlocked processors and make sense to be introduced for the Consumer product segment without a Business offering.

If true, which seems likely, the question then becomes why. So let us speculate!

One possible (but almost definitely incorrect) reason is that Intel was able to get the overclocking challenges at 22nm solved and, thus, they want to build hype over what the enthusiasts can accomplish. Josh Walrath, our monitor of the fabrication industry's pulse at PC Perspective, did not bother entertaining the idea. His experiences suggest 14nm and 22nm are "not so different".

But, in the same discussion, Ryan wondered if Intel just could not get power low enough to release anything besides the upper mainstream parts. Rather than delay further, release the parts as they can fit in whatever TDP their market demands. Josh believes that is "as good [of a theory] as any". This also seems like a very reasonable possibility to me, too.

Two other theories: yields are sufficient for the "K" market (but nowhere else) or that Intel could be throwing a bone to the mid-range (lower than Haswell-E) enthusiast by letting them lead. It could also be almost any combination of the above or more.

Or, of course, Broadwell-K could refer to something completely arbitrary. At this point, no-one knows but anyone can guess.

So then, your turn? Comments await.

Source: VR-Zone

The silver lining behind Broadwell's delay

Subject: General Tech | October 17, 2013 - 10:06 AM |
Tagged: Intel, Broadwell, delay

Making changes to the CPU in a line of machines creates a much larger impact on a company than changing the GPU, as even if the socket remains the same there are often feature additions and other obstacles to overcome.  DigiTimes points out that for vendors who are still rolling out new product lines based on Haswell the delay of Broadwell is good news as it gives them time to sell a few Haswell machines before the chip goes EOL.  For consumers looking forward to the discounts on this generation of machine when the next generation is released this news is not as welcome but then again, vendors won't need to recover as much lost income as they would have if Broadwell was released according to its original schedule. 

inventory_preview1.jpg

"Intel's decision to delay the mass shipment schedule of its 14nm Broadwell-based processors by one quarter from the end of 2013 is expected to buy brand vendors some time to finish their transition from Ivy Bridge to Haswell and allow them and Intel to readjust their steps in platform transitioning, according to sources from notebook players."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Poor yeilds will delay 14nm Broadwell chips

Subject: General Tech | October 16, 2013 - 10:12 AM |
Tagged: Intel, delay, Broadwell, 14nm

Sad news for those hoping to see Broadwell as Brian Krzanich confirmed that the delays we first heard about in June are still true and Broadwell will not be available until some time in 2014.  This slowdown of their Tick Tick strategy has been caused by the high density of defects on wafers which is driving the yields down on these chips which not only leads to less profitability but also means that supplies will be too low to go to market with.  He did give The Register some positive news, Intel is working on reducing the time it takes to implement changes to chips in production and within the next year they hope to be able to make changes to a chip three months before it is slated for release without negatively effecting yeilds.

Intel-14nm-Broadwell-Processor-Taped-Out-Months-Ago.jpg

"One of the biggest tasks that Intel CEO Brian Krzanich has set himself is reconfiguring Chipzilla so that it's quicker to build and deploy new products.

So it's a pity he has had to delay the rollout of 14-nanometer Broadwell processor chips until the first quarter of next year due to problems with quality control."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

IDF 2013: Intel Shows Off Haswell-Y and 14nm Broadwell Chips In New Devices

Subject: General Tech | September 10, 2013 - 11:29 AM |
Tagged: Intel, idf 2013, idf, haswell, fanless, convertible tablet, Broadwell, 14nm

New Intel CEO Brian Krzanich took the stage at IDF 2013 to talk about Intel's future and the PC market. The CEO believes that there is more innovation in the PC than ever before as the company introduces new Haswell and Broadwell chips, new form factors are being experimented with, and Intel moves from traditional CPU to SoC type of architectures.

Two such chips that Intel showed off that are aimed at consumer PCs include a new Haswell-Y chip and the launch of a 14nm Broadwell SoC.

Haswell Y is an ultra low power variant of the Haswell processors that have been avaialble in desktops since June. This new chip is a 4.5W TDP chip that will enable fanless mobile devices such as laptops and slate tablets. The x86-64 chip will allow fanless mobiles that run Windows and should be a good bit more powerful than current Atom-powered Windows mobiles!

IDF 2013 PC Innovation.jpg

A fanless Haswell Y system.

In addition to Haswell Y, Intel is introducing a 14nm Broadwell SoC. The Broadwell chips will be used in both servers and consumer products in 2014.

Intel IDF 2013 Haswell Y.jpg

The 14nm Broadwell SoC.

Interestingly, it looks like Intel is well on its way to shipping chips as Intel showed off a working laptop with the Broadwell chip at IDF today. Further, Intel announced that the Broadwell chips will be shipping by the end of the year!

Intel 14nm SoC.jpg

A 14nm Broadwell-powered laptop.

Stay tuned to PC Perspective for more information!

Intel IDF 14nm Broadwell working sample.jpg

New Atom C2000 processors and 14nm Server CPUs from Intel

Subject: General Tech | July 23, 2013 - 12:44 PM |
Tagged: Intel, atom, 14nm, Avoton, Broadwell, Denverton, xeon, rangeley

Intel has spent the day announcing new products for the server room, from new Atoms to Xeons.  Atom will bear the names of Avoton and Rangeley, Avoton will deal with microservers where power and heat are a major concern while Rangeley will appear in network devices and possibly mobile communication devices.  In the case of Avoton it will be replacing a chip that has not yet been released, the 32nm Atom S1200 lineup is due out in the near future and will fill a new niche for Intel that Centerton failed to fill.  The Register talks a bit more indepth here.

intel_avoton_atom_block_diagram.jpg

Slightly more powerful will be new Broadwell and Denverton Xeons, the first SoC server chips from Intel which will be manufactured on the 14nm process.  We heard much less about these upcoming chips, due for 2014 but you can read what is available at The Inquirer.

intel-low-power-server-roadmap-370x229.jpg

"SAN FRANCISCO: CHIPMAKER Intel has revealed more details about its server processor roadmap, including its upcoming Atom chips codenamed Avoton and Rangeley and new 14nm Xeon and Atom parts codenamed Broadwell and Denverton, respectively."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer