Lenovo Launches Miix2 Windows 8.1 Tablet Powered By Bay Trail-T SoC

Subject: General Tech, Mobile | October 16, 2013 - 05:26 PM |
Tagged: Windows 8.1, tablet, miix2, Lenovo, Bay Trail-T

Today, Lenovo launched a new tablet called the Miix2. The successor to the original Miix, the Miix2 is an 8-inch Windows 8.1 tablet powered by Intel's new “Bay Trail-T” Atom processor. The tablet measures 8.5” x 5.2” x 0.32” and weighs 350 grams (~12 ounces).

The Lenovo Mix 2 has an 8-inch 1280x800 IPS display that supports 10-point capacitive multi-touch. There is a 2MP front webcam and a 5MP rear camera. A Windows button sits below the display when in portrait mode. A detachable cover can be fitted to the side of the tablet and act as a stand when in landscape mode. The $20 cover also comes with a capacitive stylus.

Lenovo Miix2 8-inch Windows 8.1 tablet_Bay Trail-T.jpg

Internally, the Miix2 features a quad-core Intel Bay Trail-T processor, 2GB of RAM, up to 128GB eMMC storage, support for up to 32GB of micro SD external storage, Wi-Fi, and 3G in select countries. The eMMC storage options include 32GB, 64GB, and 128GB. The company claims up to 7 hours of battery life for the Miix2.

The new Bay Trail-T powered tablet will come pre-loaded with Microsoft's Windows 8.1 operating system (the full x86 version) and a full license of Office Home and Student 2013 productivity suite.

The specifications are not amazing, but serviceable. Hopefully Lenovo introduces an alternative SKU with an active digitizer, a higher resolution display, and physical keyboard for business users. For now though, Lenovo has a decent consumer-level Windows 8.1 tablet for $299 that will be available at the end of October.

What do you think about the Miix2? 

Source: Lenovo

Fujitsu Launches New Touch-Enabled Mobile Lineup

Subject: General Tech | October 14, 2013 - 12:37 AM |
Tagged: tablet, msata, Intel, haswell, fujitsu, Bay Trail-T

Fujitsu recently launched several new mobile devices for business users running Intel's latest Haswell and Atom chips. The "All New In Touch" portfolio includes three new Lifebook notebooks and two Stylistic slate-style tablets. All of the new devices are 14" or smaller, have long battery life (according to Fujitsu), and will be available later this month.

Specifically, the lineup includes the following devices:

  • Lifebook T734
  • Lifebook T904
  • Lifebook U904
  • Stylistic Q584
  • Stylistic Q704

The Lifebook T734, T904, and U904 are notebooks powered by Intel's Haswell processors. They come with Windows 8.1, DDR3 memory (up to 12GB on some models), several storage options, backlit keyboards, and high resolution displays. The 734 can be fitted with an optical drive or second battery pack. The 13.3" T904 has a 2560x1440 IGZO rotatable/convertible display with touch and pen support while the 14" U904 has a 3200x1800 IGZO display.

Fujitsu Lifebook U904 Ultrabook.jpg

The Fujitsu Lifebook U904.

All of the notebooks come with Windows 8.1, touchscreens, and enterprise-friendly security features.

Beyond the touchscreen-enabled notebooks, Fujitsu is launching two new tablets under its STYLISTIC brand: the Q584 and Q704. The Q584 is a 10.1" tablet with 2560x1600 display, smart card shell, and dockable keyboard. It is semi-ruggedized and is dust and water proof. It is powered by an Intel Bay Trail-T (quad core) processor clocked at 2.4GHz and either a 64GB or 128GB mSATA SSD. Other features include a 2MP front and 8MP rear camera and Wi-Fi, NFC, Bluetooth 4.0, GPS, and LTE radios.

Fujitsu Stylistic Q584 Business Ruggedized Tablet.jpg

The Fujitsu Stylistic Q584

The Stylistic Q704 steps the specifications up a bit to a 12.5" semi-ruggedized tablet powered by up to an Intel Haswell i7 vPro CPU, 8GB of LPDDR3 memory, and 256GB mSATA SSD. It has a 1920x1080 resolution display, 2MP front and 5MP rear cameras, and a smart card shell or dockable keyboard. Radios include Wi-Fi (dual band 802.11n), LTE, Bluetooth 4.0, and GPS.

The Stylistic tablets will come pre-loaded with Windows 8.1.

The entire Fujitsu lineup should be available later this month at various (not yet specified) price points. For business users, the new devices are worth a look (pending reviews that verify the battery life claims).

Source: Fujitsu

Intel's Bay Trail (-T) can ARM Wrestle. Leaked Benchmarks.

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | July 5, 2013 - 03:50 PM |
Tagged: qualcomm, Intel, Bay Trail-T, Bay Trail

Bay Trail is still seasons away but engineering samples are, and this should be no surprise, already in use at least for research and development purposes. Someone, somewhere down the line, decided to run a benchmark which was posted online. AnTuTu, the benchmark utilized, measures a spread of factors including memory, integer performance, floating point performance, 3D performance, and so forth. Unfortunately it does also include some non-CPU/GPU factors in its score, albeit barely, so best take it with a grain of salt.

The Droid Guy compiled it with a few scores from competing, ARM, devices.

intel-baytrail-t.png

Image Credit: The Droid Guy

The Silvermont-based chip, clocked at an... actually quite modest 1101 MHz, received a synthetic score of 43416. To put that in comparison: arguably the fastest ARM processor on the market, the Qualcomm's Snapdragon 800, tends to find itself with a score around the 30,000-32,000 range which is about 27-31% slower than Intel. The very popular albeit soon deprecated Nexus 7, powered by the Tegra 3, scores 12726.

Personally, I am getting a little flashback of the Intel vs. AMD battle about 8 years ago. We seem to be close to a Conroe (Core 2 Duo) vs. AMD Athlon 64 FX point between Intel and ARM. Intel eclipsed the AMD Athlon 64 FX-57 (update: I meant FX-62) and kept throwing more money at research than AMD could possibly afford. Unless ARM can severely undercut Bay Trail, Intel could follow past trends and simply bury their competitors with tens of billions in capital investment until their products are so far ahead that consumers default to Intel products.

If history repeats itself, this leaves Qualcomm and others in a difficult position. The solution seems to be either to tread water in a price point that Intel ignores or to collectively dump money into ARM and run the "out-research Intel" treadmill. Remember, this is a company who will dump twice AMD's revenue into their Research and Development year-over-year to keep ahead. Unlike Intel's GPU efforts, which did not seem like a problem that cash could solve alone, they know how to make processors.

I would not make business decisions under the assumption x86 will keep Intel hobbled indefinitely.