Kingston Technology to Demo ECC SO-DIMMs for an Avoton C2000 Microserver and Working DDR4

Subject: General Tech | September 9, 2013 - 02:10 PM |
Tagged: kingston, Avoton, Intel, ddr4

Fountain Valley, CA – September 9, 2013 – Kingston Technology Company, Inc., the independent world leader in memory products, today announced they will be showcasing working DDR4 memory, XMP certified HyperX memory on a new Ivybridge-E based desktop, 2133 MHz SO-DIMMs for a Haswell based notebook and ECC memory in an Avoton based microserver at the Intel Developers Forum (IDF) 2013. IDF will be held at the Moscone center in San Francisco, California on September 10th – 12th .

During IDF 2013 Kingston will be showcasing four demo systems. The DDR4 memory demo will highlight 192GB of working 2133MT/s DDR4 Registered DIMMs at 1.2V operating on a future Intel reference platform. The Kingston HyperX demo will be showcasing the latest HyperX memory that has been validated through Intel's XMP certification process. The demos will be shown using an X79 motherboard and one of Intel's newest Ivybridge E processors. Our 2133 MHz SO-DIMM memory demo will be shown working on a Haswell based notebook. The Microserver demo will be demonstrating 1600 MHz 1.35V low voltage ECC SODIMM memory on an Intel Atom C2000-series “Avoton” microserver. Kingston's ECC SODIMM memory has been validated on the Intel “Edisonville” microserver system, and is posted on Intel's website.

Intel's Avoton System on a Chip (SoCs) is a more powerful chip for use in the microserver market. This chip allows low power machines to handle a broader range of computing workloads. Microservers are quickly gaining in popularity as companies seek powerful, yet more energy- and physical-space efficient solutions that serve specific data center needs or cloud applications. Examples include web and cloud hosting, and big data where terabytes or petabytes of information sets are analyzed per second. Kingston’s low-voltage, high-performing microserver memory modules are the perfect match to help accomplish these tasks.

Kingston is celebrating 25 years in the memory industry. The company was founded on October 17, 1987, and has grown to become the largest third-party memory manufacturer in the world. The 25th anniversary video and information including a timeline of Kingston's history can be found on the anniversary web page. In addition, HyperX memory is celebrating its 10th anniversary. The first HyperX high-performance memory module was released in November 2002.

Source: Kingston

Intel's Avoton brings you an SoC the size of a credit card

Subject: General Tech | September 5, 2013 - 03:07 PM |
Tagged: Avoton, c2000, Intel, Edisonville

The Tech Report picked up some technical details on the C2000 series of Avoton SoC's bound for business as Microservers or high density servers.  Avoton is a true 64-bit chip and supports DDR3 and DDR3L DRAM at speeds up to 1600 MT/s and they have abandoned the FSB in favour of the crossbar style IDI that has been present in Intel's larger chips since Nehalem.  They've also replaced the Southbridge with a South Complex that provides 16 lanes of PCIe 2.0 on the fastest interconnect with a data connectivity attached alongside the PCIe.  That consists of pair of SATA 6Gbps, four SATA 3 ports and four ethernet controllers capable of 2.5Gbps which are capable of teaming and offering 10Gbps.  Check out their article for more on the hottest thing to hit server racks that won't put you in debt for life.

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"Today, Intel officially unveiled its Atom C2000-series products, based on the Avoton system-on-a-chip, so we have the opportunity to offer a little more detail about this distinctive new SoC."

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Avoton arrives today

Subject: General Tech | September 4, 2013 - 02:08 PM |
Tagged: Avoton, Intel, atom, server, silvermont, 22nm

The new Silvermont based 22nm Avoton chips are officially available as of today as Intel attempts to outmaneuver ARM's attempts to enter the server market.  These chips are not the Atom you have grown to know and despise, this is a brand new architecture which Intel claims will be vastly superior in performance while using much less power.  They are billed as true SOCs and reflect the changing server market which is now more focused on modular systems of relatively low performance which can be networked together to provide just as much processing power as is needed.  The Register did not get any performance numbers yet, hopefully we will see these chips in action soon so we can judge for ourselves if they have what it takes to make it in the server room.

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"If you were expecting Chipzilla to keep its server-chip powder dry until its Intel Developer Forum next week, surprise! It looks like Intel is going to jump the gun and get its "Avoton" Atom server chips into the field this Wednesday, as you can see from this announcement preview that Intel sent out to press and analysts over the Labor Day holiday in the States."

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Source: The Register

Intel's ARM escalation

Subject: General Tech | July 30, 2013 - 12:41 PM |
Tagged: Intel, arm, low power, server, Avoton, rangeley

Intel envisions a sea change in the server room, with servers, SANs and racks of switches which all have been controlled separately becoming much more software based as the ability to virtualize hardware becomes more prevalent.  This is not to imply that the hardware will disappear and that Intel will go the way of IBM and get out of the chip business as neither are true; instead Intel is moving forward on the belief that the optimization of your virtualization software will be more important than specific hardware optimizations.  While it is great to have tiered storage with expensive SSDs, solid SAS drives and other longer term and lower availability all working together there is little benefit if the software which allocates your data to those media doesn't do so properly.

In this new server room the SoC could be king, modular designs which offer scalable processing power to any and all tasks which is something that ARM cut its teeth on and is now scaling up their power to become a major player in server room design.  Intel is coming at this market segment from the other direction as it has to trim power down on its chips without crippling them like we saw in the first 45nm Atom chips.  To that end they are working on the new Silvermont architecture, the 22nm Avoton and Rangley which will be mature 64bit chips, something that ARM is still in early days with.  Check out more info on these two chips and their successors, along with a teaser on Broadwell at The Tech Report.

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"Last week, Intel hosted an event for press and analysts where it provided some updates on the state of its data center business. Then it proceeded to confound our expectations by demonstrating how it's gearing up for a protracted fight with ARM."

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New Atom C2000 processors and 14nm Server CPUs from Intel

Subject: General Tech | July 23, 2013 - 03:44 PM |
Tagged: Intel, atom, 14nm, Avoton, Broadwell, Denverton, xeon, rangeley

Intel has spent the day announcing new products for the server room, from new Atoms to Xeons.  Atom will bear the names of Avoton and Rangeley, Avoton will deal with microservers where power and heat are a major concern while Rangeley will appear in network devices and possibly mobile communication devices.  In the case of Avoton it will be replacing a chip that has not yet been released, the 32nm Atom S1200 lineup is due out in the near future and will fill a new niche for Intel that Centerton failed to fill.  The Register talks a bit more indepth here.

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Slightly more powerful will be new Broadwell and Denverton Xeons, the first SoC server chips from Intel which will be manufactured on the 14nm process.  We heard much less about these upcoming chips, due for 2014 but you can read what is available at The Inquirer.

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"SAN FRANCISCO: CHIPMAKER Intel has revealed more details about its server processor roadmap, including its upcoming Atom chips codenamed Avoton and Rangeley and new 14nm Xeon and Atom parts codenamed Broadwell and Denverton, respectively."

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Source: The Inquirer

The Atom ain't dead yet! New ultra low power Avoton chips for servers

Subject: General Tech | December 11, 2012 - 07:48 PM |
Tagged: 32nm, 22nm, tri-gate, Intel, atom, Avoton

Intel's Atom S1200 line of chips are obviously designed to compete with ARM's upcoming 64bit chips in the server room.  The family of processors will all be under 10W TDP, with the top chip, the Atom S1260, which is a dual core 2GHz part that produces 8.5W.  The three chips they have released are on the older 32nm process but according to EETimes you can expect new models using the 22nm tri-gate processors in the near future.  From what The Register could find out Intel has not yet ruled out LGA models as well as the embedded chips you will be seeing first.  They did pin down some more stats, with the new Atoms supporting DDR3 1333MHz and support  eight lanes of PCI Express 2.0, what they will not be able to support on chip is network connectivity, these chips will still be at least partially dependent on other chips for some of their features so they are not truly an SoC, yet.

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"CHIPMAKER Intel has released its Atom S1200 series aimed at low power single socket servers.

Intel's race to meet ARM in the low power server market has seen the firm push its Atom branded chips into sub-10W territory while supporting 64-bit memory addressing and ECC memory. Now the firm has released three dual-core chips that make up its Atom S1200 series, all sporting sub-10W TDP."

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Source: The Register