Intel Announces "Cars Are Things" - with New Automotive Platform

Subject: General Tech | May 30, 2014 - 07:21 AM |
Tagged: SoC, linux, internet of things, Intel, automotive, automation, atom

Imagine: You get into the family car and it knows that it’s you, so it adjusts everything just the way you like it. You start driving and your GPS is superimposed over the road in real time from within your windshield, with virtual arrows pointing to your next turn. Kids play games on their touchscreen windows in the back, and everyone travels safely as their cars anticipate accidents...

Sound far-fetched? Work is already being done to make things like these a reality, and Intel has now announced their stake in the future of connected, and eventually autonomous, automobiles.

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Intel's new automotive computing platform

Ensuring that every device in our lives is always connected seems like the goal of many companies going forward, and the “Internet of Things” is a very real, and rapidly growing, part of the business world. Intel is no exception, and since cars are things (as I’ve been informed) it makes sense to look in this area as well, right? Well, Intel has announced development of their automotive initiative, with the overall goal to create safer - and eventually autonomous - cars. Doug Davis, Corporate VP, Internet of Things Group at Intel, hosted the online event, which began with a video depicting automotive travel in a fully connected world. It doesn’t seem that far away...

"We are combining our breadth of experience in consumer electronics and enterprise IT with a holistic automotive investment across product development, industry partnerships and groundbreaking research efforts,” Davis said. “Our goal is to fuel the evolution from convenience features available in the car today to enhanced safety features of tomorrow and eventually self-driving capabilities.”

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So how exactly does this work? The tangible element of Intel’s vision of connected, computer controlled vehicles begins with the In-Vehicle Solutions Platform which provides Intel silicon to automakers. And as it’s an “integrated solution” Intel points out that this should cut time and expense from the current, more complex methods employed in assembling automotive computer systems. Makes sense, since they are delivering a complete Intel Atom based system platform, powered by the E3800 processor. The OS is Tizen IVI ("automotive grade" Linux). A development kit was also announced, and there are already companies creating systems using this platform, according to Intel.

Source: Intel

Backing up with Linux is a snap

Subject: General Tech | October 4, 2013 - 09:34 AM |
Tagged: linux, rsync, crontab, backup, automation

If you have any data that is important to you then you should have a backup scheme in place, even if it is simply keeping several copies of the files on different media but for many Windows users the idea of a proper automated backup scheme is something for businesses and not home users.  Then they lose some baby pictures.  At that point it is common for the sad individual to buy an additional piece of equipment that backs up at the push of a button but still tends to be kept in physical proximity to the machine it is backing up.

However if you know someone who is familiar with Linux or are not scared to try something new yourself, there are tools that exist in Linux which allow you to script a complete backup of a system, or parts thereof, to a remote location automatically; no user interaction required.  Techgage will take you through the wonderful world of rsync, crontab and 1ftp which are powerful tools in Linux and Unix to backup your data automatically and without constantly using huge amounts of bandwidth.  Spend a bit of time with some old hardware and you should be able to build yourself a backup server or NAS for free.

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"Keeping good backups of your data is important; don’t be the sucker who loses important files and has to deal with it afterwards! In this in-depth guide, you’ll learn about using rsync and lftp to transfer files, writing your own scripts and automating them, and backing up to external storage, a NAS, and a remote server without passwords."

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Source: Techgage