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Manufacturer: AMD

Frame Pacing for CrossFire

When the Radeon HD 7990 launched in April of this year, we had some not-so-great things to say about it.  The HD 7990 depends on CrossFire technology to function and we had found quite a few problems with AMD's CrossFire technology over the last months of testing with our Frame Rating technology, the HD 7990 "had a hard time justifying its $1000 price tag."  Right at launch, AMD gave us a taste of a new driver that they were hoping would fix the frame pacing and frame time variance issues seen in CrossFire, and it looked positive.  The problem was that the driver wouldn't be available until summer.

As I said then: "But until that driver is perfected, is bug free and is presented to buyers as a made-for-primetime solution, I just cannot recommend an investment this large on the Radeon HD 7990."

Today could be a very big day for AMD - the release of the promised driver update that enables frame pacing on AMD 7000-series CrossFire configurations including the Radeon HD 7990 graphics cards with a pair of Tahiti GPUs. 

It's not perfect yet and there are some things to keep an eye on.  For example, this fix will not address Eyefinity configurations which includes multi-panel solutions and the new 4K 60 Hz displays that require a tiled display configuration.  Also, we found some issues with more than two GPU CrossFire that we'll address in a later page too.

 

New Driver Details

Starting with 13.8 and moving forward, AMD plans to have the frame pacing fix integrated into all future drivers.  The software team has implemented a software based frame pacing algorithm that simply monitors the time it takes for each GPU to render a frame, how long a frame is displayed on the screen and inserts delays into the present calls when necessary to prevent very tightly timed frame renders.  This balances or "paces" the frame output to the screen without lowering the overall frame rate.  The driver monitors this constantly in real-time and minor changes are made on a regular basis to keep the GPUs in check. 

7990card.JPG

As you would expect, this algorithm is completely game engine independent and the games should be completely oblivious to all that is going on (other than the feedback from present calls, etc). 

This fix is generic meaning it is not tied to any specific game and doesn't require profiles like CrossFire can from time to time.  The current implementation will work with DX10 and DX11 based titles only with DX9 support being added later with another release.  AMD claims this was simply a development time issue and since most modern GPU-bound titles are DX10/11 based they focused on that area first.  In phase 2 of the frame pacing implementation AMD will add in DX9 and OpenGL support.  AMD wouldn't give me a timeline for implementation though so we'll have to see how much pressure AMD continues with internally to get the job done.

Continue reading our story of the new AMD Catalyst 13.8 beta driver with frame pacing support!!

Podcast #262 - Live from QuakeCon 2013!

Subject: General Tech | August 1, 2013 - 10:35 AM |
Tagged: video, shield, Samsung, quakecon, podcast, nvidia, frame rating, crossfire, amd, 840 evo, 7990

PC Perspective Podcast #262 - 08/01/2013

Join us this week as we discuss NVIDIA SHIELD, the Samsung 840 EVO, Viewer Q&A, and much more LIVE from QuakeCon 2013!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:19:01

Rumored AMD Carrizo APU (Kaveri Successor) Will Support FM2+ Socket

Subject: Processors | July 31, 2013 - 12:59 AM |
Tagged: Kaveri, fm2, carrizo, APU, amd radeon, amd

Rumors recently surfaced via VR-Zone china that AMD’s Kaveri APU successor will be code-named Carrizo, and it will be compatible with the upcoming FM2+ socket and AMD A88X chipset that Kaveri will use. 

AMD’s Carrizo APUs will reportedly be available in TDPs up to 65W and will feature Excavator CPU cores along with a next generation Radeon GPU. Much like Kaveri, Carrizo will be fully HSA compliant. The chips will also include support for DDR4.

Carrizo will allegedly begin sampling in August 2014 with mass production starting around December. That means Carrizo will be available for purchase within the first half of 2015.

FM2+ boards like the ASUS A55BM-A/USB3 are rumored to support AMD's Carrizo APUs (the successor to Kaveri).

The rumors also suggest that Carrizo will be joined by a low power “Beema” System on a Chip (SoC) and a BGA-based Nolan APU for embedded systems. Details on these complementary chips are scarce, however. Perhaps most telling is last bit of the article that suggests that AMD will not be releasing a AM3+ Vishera CPU-only processor successor. It seems AMD is going all in as an APU company after all.

I have been looking forward to the launh of AMD's Kaveri since AFDS 2012, and Carrizo appears to be a refinement of that chip. It should be more power efficient and faster thanks to architecture tweaks and process shrinks. I think that AMDs architecture and HSA approach has potential, and I'm excited to see what these upcoming chips can do with regards to performance.

AMD A10-6800K APU Overclocked to 8.2GHz

Subject: Processors | July 28, 2013 - 10:08 AM |
Tagged: Richland, overclocking, LN2, APU, amd, a10-6800k

A Finnish overclocker known as “The Stilt” recently pushed an AMD Richland APU to 8.2GHz using liquid nitrogen. In doing so, The Stilt broke the world record for APU overclocking, besting his previous overclock attempt.

AMD A10-6800K Richland APU Overclocked to 8GHz.jpg

Specifically, the chip was a retail version of the AMD A10-6800K “Richland” APU. It was overclocked to 8203.01 MHz with a 130.21 MHz base clock and 63x multiplier. Even more impressive is that The Stilt managed the overclock with less voltage -- 1.968 volts -- than his earlier (and lower) overclock. For comparison, the earlier overclock brought the A10-6800K to 8000.48 MHz using 2.008 volts.

AMD A10-6800K Richland APU Overclocked to 8GHz.png

The system used to overclock the APU included an ASUS F2A85-V Pro motherboard, 8GB of AMD DDR3 Performance memory, and a Radeon HD 7750 graphics card. The overclocker used liquid nitrogen to cool the APU while the GPU was left at stock settings and with its default air cooler. The RAM was overclocked to 2083.6 MHz with 10-11-10-27 timings.

In all, it is an impressive overclock considering all four CPU cores were left enabled! More details along with validation of the overclock can be found over at HWBot.

Also read: AMD A10-6800K and A10-6700 Review: Richland Finally Lands @ PC Perspective

Source: HWBot

AMD Announces Several New Gaming Evolved Titles

Subject: General Tech | July 21, 2013 - 02:45 AM |
Tagged: thief, pc gaming, gaming evolved, gaming, amd

Earlier this week, AMD announced that several new PC games would be part of the company's Gaming Evolved program. First revealed in 2010, AMD's Gaming Evolved program is the equivalent to NVIDIA's The Way It's Meant To Be Played initiative. The AMD program works with game developers to implement new technologies and to optimize games for AMD hardware.

amdgamingevolved.jpg

Specifically, AMD has announced that it has worked with developers under its Gaming Evolved program to develop the following games:

  • Castlevania: Lord of Shadow
  • Final Fantasy XIV
  • Leisure Suit Larry Reloaded
  • Murdered: Soul Suspect
  • Pirate 101
  • Shadow of the Eternals
  • Thief

These games are upcoming PC games, some of which will be available as soon as next month while others are still in-development. AMD worked with MercuryStream, Square Enix, N-Fusion Interactive, Airtight Games, KingsIsle Entertainment, Precursor Games, and Eidos Montreal respectively.

Screenshots of Castlevania: Lords of Shadow (Left) and Thief (Right). Click on image for a larger version.

These next generation games should work well on AMD platforms as a result of the developers' partnership with AMD. Hopefully that means next-generation visuals and games that will work best on the PC with all the usual customization and graphics settings options that PC gamers expect.

Source: AMD

PC Leading The Crew of Next Generation Platforms

Subject: General Tech | July 19, 2013 - 11:39 PM |
Tagged: ps4, pc gaming, amd

The last ten years were somewhat hostile to PC gamers: DRM forced us into an arms race with companies we were trying to purchase services from; our versions were ported often late and carelessly; and we were told, repetitively, that our money was not relevant to real business-or-something-like-that. The rise of Steam aside, the whole last generation became the mullet of video game history...

Console in the front; PC in the back; console in the front; PC in the back.

The next generation at least demonstrates promise for our platform as we cross the blurry divide. Small and Indie studios push new concepts, and even new business models, almost always with the PC forefront. The growth of mobile, whether cutting into computer sales or not, are often designed abstracted from native hardware which allow software like Bluestacks to include the PC and pave the way toward development in completely open, abstract platforms, such as standards-compliant web browsers.

crew-map.jpg

We will also experience a rebirth, due in part to AMD and their role in the upcoming console architectures, of games developed first on the PC and later ported to other platforms. The Crew, developed by Ubisoft Reflections, is the sum of a large repository of Windows, finally 64-bit, Direct3D 11 source code. From there, the PlayStation 4 version is derived.

Eurogamer goes into remarkable depth about certain aspects of the PS4 architecture and the process of bringing a PC title to its transistors. For instance, we were confused during Sony's announcement about the logistics of attaching Jaguar cores to a unified GDDR5-based memory system. The Eurogamer column, which draws reference to an earlier ExtremeTech editorial suggesting three possible block diagrams describing PS4 memory interfaces, more-than-suggests asymmetry between access rates across the alleged two four-core CPU modules, GPU, and system memory.

ps4-architecture.png

Image Credit, ExtremeTech via Eurogamer

As an interesting side-note: it turns out that just 6 cores will be available to developers, the remaining two are reserved for operating system usage.

It is good to see the PC leading the charge, genuinely this time, into what video games will eventually become. Feel free to market to other platforms as there will be no discrimination against your interested from my direction. So long as my dollars are respected when I decide their best use is for your product, I will be a satisfied customer.

Source: Eurogamer

Cooler Master Unveils Massive V8 GTS CPU Cooler

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 19, 2013 - 11:03 PM |
Tagged: v8 gts, Intel, hsf, cpu cooler, cooler master, amd

Cooler Master has unveiled a massive CPU cooler called the V8 GTS. The new high end air cooler measures 154 x 140 x 153.5mm and weighs 1.9 pounds. It combines a horizontal vapor chamber, eight heat pipes, triple aluminum fin stacks, and two shrouded PWM fans with red LEDs.

10_Product_V8 GTS_installed 01.jpg

The V8 GTS is compatible with both Intel and AMD CPU sockets, including LGA 775, 1150 1155, 1156, 1366, and 2011 on the Intel side and AM2, AM3, AM3+, FM1, and FM2 on the AMD side. A horizontal vapor chamber is used for the CPU baseplate to effectively move heat away from the processor an into the heatpipes.

20_Product_V8 GTS_bottom.jpg

Eight 6mm heat pipes further transfer heat to three total aluminum fin stacks. Further, two 140mm PWM-controlled fans move cool air across the fins to facilitate cooling high end and overclocked processors. The fans can spin between 600 and 1,600 RPM and are rated for between approximately 28 and 82 CFM respectively.

14_Product_V8 GTS_side.jpg

Other features of the Cooler Master V8 GTS include red LEDs and a black shroud. The cooler is designed to allow plenty of room for clearance around the RAM area to allow for memory with heatspreaders to be used. It is rated to be able to cool up to 250W. It may be rather heavy and may or may not be a hemi, but it certainly looks cool (heh)!

7_Product_V8 GTS_front01.jpg

The CM V8 GTS is model number RR-V8VC-1GPR-R1 and comes with a 2 year warranty. Cooler Master has not yet detailed pricing or availability. In the meantime, Hardware Secrets managed to get their hands on the massive cooler to put its performance to the test.

AMD Announces $1.16 Billion Revenue In Q2 2013 Fiancial Results

Subject: General Tech | July 19, 2013 - 02:23 PM |
Tagged: amd, financial results, graphics and visual solutions, x86

AMD recently released its financial results for the second quarter of 2013. AMD had a decent quarter that demonstrated the positive effects of its ongoing restructuring efforts, but the company is, unfortunately, still operating at a loss.

In Q2 2013, AMD reported revenue of $1.16 billion, a 40% gross margin, operating loss of $29 million, and a net loss of $74 million. It experienced loss per share of $0.10. Total revenue has increased 7% versus last quarter, but is still down 18% YoY (Year over Year).

Within AMD, there are two major groups that bring in revenue: the Computing Solutions group and the recently-renamed Graphics and Visual Solutions group.

The Computing Solutions group is responsible for processors while the Graphics and Visual Solutions group is responsible for all of AMD’s graphics technologies, including GPUs.

The Computing Solutions groups experienced a 12% increase in revenue versus last quarter, and a 20% decrease in revenue versus the same time last year. According to AMD, the increase in revenue is primarily due to “significantly higher” notebook shipments and an increased number of desktop and server shipments. Further, the YoY decrease is the result of lower overall unit shipments and lower processor Average Selling Prices (ASP).

While the processor division is doing better, the Graphics and Visual Solutions group saw revenue decreases versus last quarter and last year. Specifically, revenue fell 5% QoQ and fell 13% YoY. AMD reasons that the Average Selling Price of its GPUs has increased YoY while also falling versus last quarter.

During Q2 2013 (and 2013 in general), AMD announced design wins for all the major gaming consoles and Apple’s upcoming Mac Pro desktop with dual FirePro cards, released a slew of new A-Series and embedded G-Series APUs, unleashed its 5.0GHz FX-9590 Piledriver-based CPU, and launched low power Opteron X processors. AMD's performance in Q2 was the result of its continued focus on restructuring as well as "opportunities in high growth and traditioanl PC businesses" according to CEO Rory Read.

According to the company, its outlook for next quarter is a revenue increase of 22% (+/- 3%), or approximately $1.42 billion.

Source: AMD

Just how does a 5GHz AMD chip perform?

Subject: Processors | July 19, 2013 - 01:13 PM |
Tagged: vishera, TWKR, piledriver, FX-9590, Centurion, amd

As we have been discussing the 220W TDP 5GHz AMD FX-9590 recently it seems a good idea to show what level of performance you can expect from this chip.  Hardware Canucks had a chance to benchmark the performance of this chip using both synthetic benchmarks and some gaming tests.  When they tried to overclock the chip they ran into difficulties with not only heat, as you would expect but they also ran into an issue with power, they maxed out the amount that the board could provide.  Single thread performance is not up to par with SandyBridge-E but in properly designed multi-threaded programs the performance is impressive, though perhaps not for an $800+ chip. 

FX-9590-1.jpg

"With the FX-9590, AMD has taken their Piledriver architecture and pushed it to the absolute limit. By running at an astounding 5GHz, this new CPU is the fastest in the FX-series stable."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Velocity Micro Debuts Vision M35 Desktop With AMD FX-9000 Series Processors

Subject: Systems | July 16, 2013 - 09:12 PM |
Tagged: vision m35, velocity micro, FX-9590, FX-9370, amd, 5ghz

Boutique system manufacturer Velocity Micro has announced its new Vision M35 gaming desktop powered by AMD’s latest FX-9000 series processors.

The Velocity Micro Vision M35 can be configured with a variety of hardware components on the company’s website. The system can be housed in a number of traditional Velocity Micro cases with internal hardware that includes either an AMD FX-9370 or an AMD FX-9590 processor, up to 32GB of DDR3 RAM, both SSDs and HDDs in various capacities, and up to a 1200W power supply. Graphics card options include a number of cards from both AMD and NVIDIA’s latest series (AMD 7000, NVIDIA 600/700). By default, the Vision M35 comes pre-loaded with Microsoft Windows 8 x64, but users can elect to install Windows 7.

Velocity Micro Vision M35 Computer with AMD FX-9590 and Geforce Graphics.jpg

The AMD FX-9000 series processors are the real news here, and Velocity Micro is among the first boutique vendors to use them. As a refresher, the FX-9370 and FX-9590 are 8-core processors with 16MB of cache based on the company’s Piledriver micro-architecture. The FX-9370 has a base clockspeed of 4.4 GHz and a turbo clockspeed of 4.7 GHz while the FX-9590 comes clocked at 4.7 GHz base and 5.0 GHz turbo. Despite being aimed at the enthusiast crowd, these chips will only be available to OEMs and system builders and not as retail parts.

The new AMD-powered Velocity Micro Vision M35 is available now online with a base price of $2,799. I was able to configure a M35 with the following specifications for $3,169 (and managed to get a quote of $2,969 after a $200 off coupon selectable on the configuration page).

  • Velocity Micro QX-W chassis
  • 850W power supply
  • AMD FX-9590 CPU
  • 8GB DDR3 RAM
  • AMD Radeon 7950 GPU
  • 120GB Intel 520 SSD
  • 1TB 7200 RPM hard drive
  • Integrated GbE and audio
  • (No keyboard or mouse or other accessories selected)

Granted, its on the pricier side, but its not a bad system as far as pre-built boutique PCs go. And for AMD fans, systems like this (and these) are going to be the only official option for getting a FX-9590 processor.