Berlin invades San Francisco; meet the new HSA enabled Opteron

Subject: General Tech | April 17, 2014 - 01:07 PM |
Tagged: amd, hsa, berlin, Opteron X-series, Red Hat

Next Wednesday we will get our first look at the HSA enabled Opteron X Series, otherwise known as Berlin.  AMD will be unveiling the processor at the Red Hat Summit in San Francisco with an X2100 Opteron running on a Linux environment that is based on the Fedora Project.  We have very recently had a chance to see the desktop equivalent, Kaveri, in action but this will be the first example of AMD's heterogeneous computing on a server.  Keep your eyes peeled for our coverage, in the mean time you can get a preview at The Register.

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"AMD will give the first public demo of its second-generation Opteron X-Series server processor, code-named "Berlin", at the Red Hat Summit in San Francisco on Wednesday."

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Source: The Register

Steaming on a Sempron

Subject: General Tech | April 16, 2014 - 01:31 PM |
Tagged: steambox, amd, sempron, athlon, Kabini, SteamOS

A popular question that has arisen from the release of the four new low cost Kabini processors has been their effectiveness in powering a Steam Machine. Phoronix have just finished testing the new Athlon and Sempron chips, paired with several laptop IGPs using Catalyst Linux driver fglrx 13.35.5/OpenGL 4.3.12798 on Ubuntu 14.04.  They tested Counter-Strike: Source, Half-Life 2: Lost Coast, and Portal at a variety of resolutions to see just how much performance these chips offer.  None of the chips could offer acceptable performance at 1080p and only Portal was delivered at 60fps assuming you used 1024x768.  They will be following this review with another that will pair discreet GPUs with Kabini which should increase gaming capabilities greatly.

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"Earlier today the latest installment of our extensive Linux testing of AMD's new Athlon AM1 APUs were shared in the form of RadeonSI vs. Gallium3D benchmarks of the Radeon R3 Graphics found with these new entry-level APUs. Not included with that open-source vs. closed-source driver testing was any Source Engine / Steam Linux game testing due to an XCB DRI3 issue, but this article is devoted to looking at the Catalyst performance for the Sempron 2650, Sempron 3850, Athlon 5150, and Athlon 5350 to see whether any of these APUs can make the cut for a budget Steam Machine."

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Source: Phoronix

Testing Kabini on Linux

Subject: Processors | April 14, 2014 - 03:22 PM |
Tagged: Kabini, linux, Athlon 5350, Athlon 5150, Sempron 3850, Semprov 2650, amd, athlon, sempron

An easy way to trim the cost of a lower end system is to skip Windows and install Linux, along with picking a less expensive AMD chip to power your system.  AMD has recently gifted us with new Kabini based Sempron and Athlon chips, the most expensive of which is available for less that $70.  For testing Phoronix used Ubuntu 14.04, the 3.14 kernel and Mesa 10.2 along with the Radeon 7.3.99 driver.  You will be glad to know that there were no compatibility problems with Linux whatsoever, all CPUs performed more or less as expected as you can see for yourself in the full review.

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"It's been a busy past few days since AMD launched their "AM1" Socketed Kabini APUs. After the initial Athlon 5350 Linux review on launch-day, I did some tests involving a faster kernel and newer Mesa code along with some reference DDR3 memory scaling benchmarks for these APUs with Jaguar processor cores. Since then the Athlon 5150 and Sempron 3850/2650 APUs arrived."

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Source: Phoronix
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: Kingston

Ultra-Speed RAM, APU-Style

In our review of the Kingston HyperX Predator 2666MHz kit, we discovered what those knowledgeable about Intel memory scaling already knew: for most applications, and specifically games, there is no significant advantage to increases in memory speed past the current 1600MHz DDR3 standard.  But this was only half of the story. What about memory scaling with an AMD processor, and specifically an APU? To find out, we put AMD’s top APU, the A10-7850K, to the test!

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Ready for some APU memory testing!

The APU

AMD has created a compelling option with their APU lineup, and the inclusion of powerful integrated graphics allows for interesting build options with lower power and space requirements, and even make building tiny mini-ITX systems for gaming realistic. It’s this graphical prowess compared to any other onboard solution that creates an interesting value proposition for any gamer looking at a new low-cost build. The newest Kaveri APU’s are getting a lot of attention and they beg the question, is a discrete graphics card really needed for gaming at reasonable settings?

Continue reading our article on using high speed DDR3 memory with AMD APUs!!

AMD Kabini Chips Now Available At Retail

Subject: Processors | April 10, 2014 - 04:38 PM |
Tagged: sempron, Kabini, Athlon 5350, athlon, amd, AM1

AMD has officially announced its socketed Kabini chips and the AM1 platform. Information on the chips and motherboards have been slowly trickling out since CES, but now they are finally official and available for purchase at retail.

Specifically, AMD has launched four desktop Kabini processors under the Athlon and Sempron brands. In addition ASRock, ASUS, Biostar, ECS, Gigabyte, and MSI all have AM1 platform motherboards ready to accept the new AMD chips. The motherboards come in mini ITX and micro ATX form factors.

The AMD Athlon 5350 SoC Installed in the ASUS AM1I-A motherboard which was used in our full Kabini review.

All four of the AMD chips have 25W TDPs and integrated GPUs with 128 stream processors. The Kabini chips support four PCI-E 2.0 lanes, two SATA III 6 Gbps ports, two USB 3.0 ports, and eight USB 2.0 ports. Motherboard permitting, the Kabini GPU supports up to three display outputs (HDMI, DisplayPort, and VGA). The chips differ by CPU and GPU clockspeeds, core count, and DDR3 memory frequency support. On the low end, the $34 (MSRP) Sempron 2650 is a dual core part clocked at 1.45 GHz with a GPU clocked that 400 MHz that supports a maximum memory clockspeed of 1333 MHz. The top-end Athlon 5350 is a quad core processor clocked at 2.05 GHz with a GPU clocked at 600 MHz and supports DDR3 1600 MHz. This chips has a $59 MSRP. The desktop chips are similar to their mobile counterparts, with slight differences in clockspeed and (of course) price and the socketed implementation.

Processor TDP CPU L2 Cache GPU Maximum Memory Speed Price
Athlon 5350 25W 4 cores @ 2.05 GHz 2MB 128 SPs @ 600 MHz 1600 MHz $59
Athlon 5150 25W 4 cores @ 1.6 GHz 2MB 128 SPs @ 600 MHz 1600 MHz $49
Sempron 3850 25W 4 cores @ 1.3 GHz 2MB 128 SPs @ 450 MHz 1600 MHz $39
Sempron 2650 25W 2 cores @ 1.45 GHz 1MB 128 SPs @ 400 MHz 1333 MHz $34

The motherboards for the new Kabini processors will come in mini ITX and micro ATX. We previously covered AM1 platform boards from ASRock, Biostar, and MSI. In general, the boards offer up most of the standard IO and other functionality that enthusiasts are used to from existing AMD motherboards including multiple display outputs, networking, audio, and a plethora of USB ports on the rear IO panel and SATA ports, PCI Express slot(s), and two DDR3 DIMM slots internally. Interestingly, the boards are fairly bare and free from chipsets because the IO is included in the processor itself. This enables motherboards that are notably cheaper than, say, FM2+ and AM3 boards.

When AMD first launched the AM1 platform, the company stated that a combination of a Kabini chip and FS1b-socketed motherboard would add up to about $60. Now that the platform is official, retail prices are starting to pop up. With the Kabini processors and motherboards each ranging from around $30 to $60, AMD has technically hit that mark. Adding a hard drive, RAM, and enclosure will get you a baisc and complete system for less than $150.

AMD's Kabini chips are set to compete against Intel's Bay Trail-D processor which comes pre-soldered onto motherboards. The AM1 platform does look to be the slightly cheaper option that also gives users the choice of motherboard and the possibility of upgrading to soecketed Beema (Kabini's successor) SoCs.

If you are interested in desktop Kabini, be sure to check out our full review of the AMD Athlon 5350 at PC Perspective!

Source: Tech Report

Podcast #295 - AMD Radeon R9 295X2, AMD AM1 Socket SoCs, Building a 1080P Gaming PC for under $550 and more

Subject: General Tech | April 10, 2014 - 02:25 PM |
Tagged: podcast, video, amd, 295x2, AM1, Plextor M6e, nvidia, 337.50, GFE

PC Perspective Podcast #295 - 04/10/2014

Join us this week as we discuss the AMD Radeon R9 295X2, AMD AM1 Socket SoCs, Building a 1080P Gaming PC for under $550 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath and Allyn Malventano

 
This podcast is brought to you by Coolermaster, and the CM Storm Pulse-R Gaming Headset!
 
Program length: 1:22:06
 
  1. Week in Review:
  2. 0:51:18 This podcast is brought to you by Coolermaster, and the CM Storm Pulse-R Gaming Headset!
  3. News items of interest:
    1. 1:03:10 NAB News
  4. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Jeremy: Move over mineral oil, 3M's Novec
    2. Allyn: For those with too many tabs in Chrome - OneTab
  5. Closing/outro

Be sure to subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube channel!!

 

 

Author:
Subject: Processors
Manufacturer: AMD

AMD Brings Kabini to the Desktop

Perhaps we are performing a study of opposites?  Yesterday Ryan posted his R9 295X2 review, which covers the 500 watt, dual GPU monster that will be retailing for $1499.  A card that is meant for only the extreme enthusiast who has plenty of room in their case, plenty of knowledge about their power supply, and plenty of electricity and air conditioning to keep this monster at bay.  The product that I am reviewing could not be any more different.  Inexpensive, cool running, power efficient, and can be fit pretty much anywhere.  These products can almost be viewed as polar opposites.

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The interesting thing of course is that it shows how flexible AMD’s GCN architecture is.  GCN can efficiently and effectively power the highest performing product in AMD’s graphics portfolio, as well as their lowest power offerings in the APU market.  The performance scales very linearly when it comes to adding in more GCN compute cores.

The product that I am of course referring to are the latest Athlon and Sempron APUs that are based on the Kabini architecture which fuses Jaguar x86 cores with GCN compute cores.  These APUs were announced last month, but we did not have the chance at the time to test them.  Since then these products have popped up in a couple of places around the world, but this is the first time that reviewers have officially received product from AMD and their partners.

Click to read the entire review on AMD's AM1 Platform!

AMD Selects Asetek to Liquid Cool The World’s Fastest Graphics Card

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 8, 2014 - 06:51 PM |
Tagged: asetek, amd, r9 295x2

If you wondered where the custom cooler for the impressively powerful AMD Radeon R9 295X2 came from then wonder no more.  The cooler was designed specifically for this card by Asetek, a veteran in cooling computer components with water.  You should keep that in mind the next time you think about picking up a third party watercooler!

GPU_LC.jpg

Asetek, the world’s leading supplier of computer liquid cooling solutions, today announced that its liquid cooling technology will be used to cool AMD’s latest flagship graphics card. The new AMD Radeon R9 295X2 is the world’s fastest graphics card. Boasting 8 gigabytes of memory and over 11 teraflops of computing power, the AMD Radeon R9 295X2 graphics card is the undisputed graphics performance champion.

“Today’s high-end graphic cards pack insane amounts of power into a very small area and removing that heat is no small task. Utilizing our liquid cooling for graphics cards unlocks new opportunities for performance and low noise,” said André Sloth Eriksen, Founder and CEO of Asetek. “The fact that AMD has chosen Asetek liquid cooling for their reference cooling design is a testament to the reliability and performance of our technology.”

The AMD Radeon R9 295X2 is the first graphics card reference design ever to ship with an advanced closed-loop water cooling system. The Asetek-developed liquid cooling system on the AMD Radeon R9 295X2 graphics card delivers significant benefits for the performance-hungry enthusiast, hardcore gamer or Bitcoin miner. Users will appreciate the unobtrusive noise, low GPU and component temperatures, and blistering performance - right out of the box.

“As the most powerful graphics card offered to date, we knew we needed an outstanding custom cooling solution for the AMD Radeon R9 295X2 graphics card,” said Matt Skynner, corporate vice president and general manager, Graphics Business Unit, AMD. “Asetek’s liquid cooling embodies the efficient performance, reliability and reputation we were seeking in a partner. As GPUs become more powerful, the benefits of collaborating with Asetek and integrating our world-class technologies are clear.”

The AMD Radeon R9 295X2 graphics card utilizes Asetek’s proven, maintenance free, factory sealed liquid cooling technology to cool the two powerful GPUs. This liquid cooling design ensures continuous stability even under full load. The card is easy to install and fits in most computer cases on the market today. With more than 1.5 million units in the field today, Asetek liquid cooling provides worry free operation to gamers and PC enthusiasts alike.

Source: Asetek
Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

A Powerful Architecture

AMD likes to toot its own horn. Just a take a look at the not-so-subtle marketing buildup to the Radeon R9 295X2 dual-Hawaii graphics card, released today. I had photos of me shipped to…me…overnight. My hotel room at GDC was also given a package which included a pair of small Pringles cans (chips) and a bottle of volcanic water. You may have also seen some photos posted of a mysterious briefcase with its side stickered by with the silhouette of a Radeon add-in board.

This tooting is not without some validity though. The Radeon R9 295X2 is easily the fastest graphics card we have ever tested and that says a lot based on the last 24 months of hardware releases. It’s big, it comes with an integrated water cooler, and it requires some pretty damn specific power supply specifications. But AMD did not compromise on the R9 295X2 and, for that, I am sure that many enthusiasts will be elated. Get your wallets ready, though, this puppy will run you $1499.

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Both AMD and NVIDIA have a history of producing high quality dual-GPU graphics cards late in the product life cycle. The most recent entry from AMD was the Radeon HD 7990, a pair of Tahiti GPUs on a single PCB with a triple fan cooler. While a solid performing card, the product was released in a time when AMD CrossFire technology was well behind the curve and, as a result, real-world performance suffered considerably. By the time the drivers and ecosystem were fixed, the HD 7990 was more or less on the way out. It was also notorious for some intermittent, but severe, overheating issues, documented by Tom’s Hardware in one of the most harshly titled articles I’ve ever read. (Hey, Game of Thrones started again this week!)

The Hawaii GPU, first revealed back in September and selling today under the guise of the R9 290X and R9 290 products, is even more power hungry than Tahiti. Many in the industry doubted that AMD would ever release a dual-GPU product based on Hawaii as the power and thermal requirements would be just too high. AMD has worked around many of these issues with a custom water cooler and placing specific power supply requirements on buyers. Still, all without compromising on performance. This is the real McCoy.

Continue reading our review of the AMD Radeon R9 295X2 8GB Dual Hawaii Graphics Card!!

MSI's R9 290X GAMING 4G sports a variety of overclocked settings and a Twin Frozr IV

Subject: Graphics Cards | April 7, 2014 - 07:14 PM |
Tagged: msi, R9 290X GAMING 4G, amd, hawaii, R9 290X, Twin Frozr IV, factory overclocked

The familiar Twin Frozr IV cooler has been added to the R9 290X GPU on MSI's latest AMD graphics card.  The R9 290X GAMING 4G sports 4GB of GDDR5 running at an even 5GHz and a GPU that has three separate top speeds depending on the profile you choose; 1040 MHz with OC Mode, 1030 MHz for Gaming Mode and 1000 MHz in Silent Mode.  [H]ard|OCP also tried manually overclocking and ended up with a peak of 1130MHz GPU and 5.4GHz for the GDDR5, not a bad bump over the factory overclock.  Check out the performance of the various speeds in their full review.

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"On our test bench today is MSI's newest high-end GAMING series graphics cards in the form of the MSI Radeon R9 290X GAMING 4G video card. We will strap it to our test bench and compare it to the MSI GeForce GTX 780 Ti GAMING 3G card out-of-box and overclocked to determine which card provides the best gameplay experience."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP