Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

AMD Polaris Architecture Coming Mid-2016

In early December, I was able to spend some time with members of the newly formed Radeon Technologies Group (RTG), which is a revitalized and compartmentalized section of AMD that is taking over all graphics work. During those meetings, I was able to learn quite a bit about the plans for RTG going forward, including changes for AMD FreeSync and implementation of HDR display technology, and their plans for the GPUOpen open-sourced game development platform.  Perhaps most intriguing of all: we received some information about the next-generation GPU architecture, targeted for 2016.

Codenamed Polaris, this new architecture will be the 4th generation of GCN (Graphics Core Next), and it will be the first AMD GPU that is built on FinFET process technology. These two changes combined promise to offer the biggest improvement in performance per watt, generation to generation, in AMD’s history.

polaris-5.jpg

Though the amount of information provided about the Polaris architecture is light, RTG does promise some changes to the 4th iteration of its GCN design. Those include primitive discard acceleration, an improved hardware scheduler, better pre-fetch, increased shader efficiency, and stronger memory compression. We have already discussed in a previous story that the new GPUs will include HDMI 2.0a and DisplayPort 1.3 display interfaces, which offer some impressive new features and bandwidth. From a multimedia perspective, Polaris will be the first GPU to include support for h.265 4K decode and encode acceleration.

polaris-15.jpg

This slide shows us quite a few changes, most of which were never discussed specifically that we can report, coming to Polaris. Geometry processing and the memory controller stand out as potentially interesting to me – AMD’s Fiji design continues to lag behind NVIDIA’s Maxwell in terms of tessellation performance and we would love to see that shift. I am also very curious to see how the memory controller is configured on the entire Polaris lineup of GPUs – we saw the introduction of HBM (high bandwidth memory) with the Fury line of cards.

Continue reading our overview of the AMD Polaris announcement!!

Meet GCN next, AMD's Polaris

Subject: General Tech | January 4, 2016 - 03:48 PM |
Tagged: amd, Polaris, FinFET

Ryan's coverage of the new Polaris architecture will be up momentarily but in the meantime you can take a peek at The Tech Report's coverage here.  The new architecture will utilize FinFETs of an unspecified process node and is designed to power the new UHD displays and VR headsets due for release over this coming year.  Raja Koduri discusses the two major goals of the new architecture, fast pixels and deep pixels.  Fast pixels refers to the awe inspiring amount of bandwidth required to draw on UHD displays, twin 4K displays would require addressing 1.8 gigapixels per refresh which would certainly need some fast pixels.  Deep pixels refers to improved support for variable refresh rates and likely encompasses support for the new HDR technology we will see appear on the market in the near future.  If you can't hold off your curiosity for our coverage you can pop over here.

timeline.jpg

"AMD will release new Radeons built on its next-gen Polaris architecture in mid-2016. We got an early look at this new architecture and AMD's plans for building these chips with FinFETs last month at the company's Radeon Technologies Group tech summit."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Rumor: Polaris Is the next AMD Radeon Core Architecture

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 31, 2015 - 06:41 PM |
Tagged: rumor, report, radeon, Polaris, graphics card, gpu, GCN, amd

A report claims that Polaris will succeed GCN (Graphics Core Next) as the next AMD Radeon GPU core, which will power the 400-series graphics cards.

AMD-Polaris.jpg

Image via VideoCardz.com

As these rumors go, this is about as convoluted as it gets. VideoCardz has published the story, sourced from WCCFtech, who was reporting on a post with supposedly leaked slides at HardwareBattle. The primary slide in question has since been pulled, and appears below:

slide.png

Image via HWBattle.com

Of course the name does nothing to provide architectural information on this presumptive GCN replacement, and a new core for the 400-series GPUs was expected anyway after the 300-series was largely a rebranded 200-series (that's a lot of series). Let's hope actual details emerge soon, but for now we can speculate on mysterious tweets from certain interested parties:

 

Source: VideoCardz
Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: ASUS

Another TN Option for FreeSync Fans

If you had asked me a year ago how many monitors we would be able to store in the PC Perspective offices, I would have vastly underestimated the true answer. It seems that not only is the demand from readers for information about the latest and greatest display technology at a demand that we have never seen, but vendors that sell high quality monitors for enthusiasts and gamers are pumping out more models than I can keep track of.

But this is good, right? The more options we have, the more likely we are to find the best choice for each user, for each budget and for each required feature set. But more choices can also lead to confusion - that's where we continue to chime in. Today we are taking a look at the ASUS MG278Q monitor, a 27-in 2560x1440 display with support for AMD FreeSync technology and sporting a maximum refresh rate of 144Hz. With a TN panel rather than IPS, the MG278Q has a current selling price of just $399, well under the equivalent G-Sync monitors.

02.jpg

Even better, since we started our evaluation on the display, AMD released the Radeon Crimson driver, introducing a new feature called Low Frame Rate Compensation. This essentially allows most of the FreeSync displays on the market to match NVIDIA G-Sync's ability to handle lower frame rates without resorting to V-Sync tearing, etc. If you haven't read about it, do so in the link above.

Continue reading our review of the ASUS MG278Q 2560x1440 144Hz FreeSync monitor!!

Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

May the Radeon be with You

In celebration of the release of The Force Awakens as well as the new Star Wars Battlefront game from DICE and EA, AMD sent over some hardware for us to use in a system build, targeted at getting users up and running in Battlefront with impressive quality and performance, but still on a reasonable budget. Pairing up an AMD processor, MSI motherboard, Sapphire GPU with a low cost chassis, SSD and more, the combined system includes a FreeSync monitor for around $1,200.

swbf.jpg

Holiday breaks are MADE for Star Wars Battlefront

Though the holiday is already here and you'd be hard pressed to build this system in time for it, I have a feeling that quite a few of our readers and viewers will find themselves with some cash and gift certificates in hand, just ITCHING for a place to invest in a new gaming PC.

The video above includes a list of components, the build process (in brief) and shows us getting our gaming on with Star Wars Battlefront. Interested in building a system similar the one above on your own? Here's the hardware breakdown.

  AMD Powered Star Wars Battlefront System
Processor AMD FX-8370 - $197
Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO - $29
Motherboard MSI 990FXA Gaming - $137
Memory AMD Radeon Memory DDR3-2400 - $79
Graphics Card Sapphire NITRO Radeon R9 380X - $266
Storage SanDisk Ultra II 240GB SSD - $79
Case Corsair Carbide 300R - $68
Power Supply Seasonic 600 watt 80 Plus - $69
Monitor AOC G2460PF 1920x1080 144Hz FreeSync - $259
Total Price Full System (without monitor) - Amazon.com - $924

For under $1,000, plus another $250 or so for the AOC FreeSync capable 1080p monitor, you can have a complete gaming rig for your winter break. Let's detail some of the specific components.

cpu.jpg

AMD sent over the FX-8370 processor for our build, a 4-module / 8-core CPU that runs at 4.0 GHz, more than capable of handling any gaming work load you can toss at it. And if you need to do some transcoding, video work or, heaven forbid, school or productivity work, the FX-8370 has you covered there too.

cooler.jpg

For the motherboard AMD sent over the MSI 990FXA Gaming board, one of the newer AMD platforms that includes support for USB 3.1 so you'll have a good length of usability for future expansion. The Cooler Master Hyper 212 EVO cooler was our selection to keep the FX-8370 running smoothly and 8GB of AMD Radeon DDR3-2133 memory is enough for the system to keep applications and the Windows 10 operating system happy.

Continue reading about our AMD system build for Star Wars Battlefront!!

Samsung adding AMD to their customers?

Subject: General Tech | December 22, 2015 - 07:07 PM |
Tagged: amd, Samsung, 14nm, rumour

The talk around the watercooler includes a rumour that AMD may use Samsung to produce at least some of their 14nm chips in the coming year.  If true this has been a huge year for Samsung who produce NVIDIA chips as well as recently picking up a contract with Apple to produce some of their A9 SoCs.  The rumour still includes GLOBALFOUNDRIES as a source for APUs and GPUs so this would make Samsung a second source for working silicon, which we can hope will alleviate some of AMD's difficulty in maintaining supplies of products.  This could also help fund Samsung's development of their 10nm FinFET node which the claim should be in production by the end of 2016.  As always, take the rumour for what it is but if you want to learn more about what is being said you can pop over to The Inquirer.

Samsung_10_nm_Graphic_Wide.jpg

"A report in South Korea's Electronic Times, which cited unknown sources, said that Samsung Electronics will start making new chips for AMD sometime next year."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

Thought you wouldn't see a new Radeon Crimson driver before the New Year, eh?

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 17, 2015 - 10:49 PM |
Tagged: radeon, crimson, amd

unnamed.jpg

That's right folks, the official AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition 15.12 has just launched for you to install.  This includes the fixes for fan speeds when you are using AMD Overdrive, your settings will stick and the fans will revert to normal after you go back to the desktop from an intense gaming session.  There are multiple fixes for Star Wars Battlefront, Fallout 4 and several GUI fixes within the software itself.  As always there are still a few kinks being worked out but overall it is worth popping over to AMD to grab the new driver.  You should also have less issues upgrading from within Crimson after this update as well.

Source: AMD

Podcast #379 - Snapdragon 820, AMD's GPUOpen, Thrustmaster T300 and more!

Subject: General Tech | December 17, 2015 - 07:35 PM |
Tagged: video, Thrustmaster, T300, snapdragon 820, Skylake, qualcomm, podcast, logitech g, Intel, i3-6100, gpuopen, gameworks, arx control, amd

PC Perspective Podcast #379 - 12/17/2015

Join us this week as we discuss the Snapdragon 820, AMD's GPUOpen, Thrustmaster T300 and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom, Allyn Malventano, and Sebastian Peak

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Author:
Manufacturer: AMD

Open Source your GPU!

As part of the AMD’s recent RTG (Radeon Technologies Group) Summit in Sonoma, the company released information about a new initiative to help drive development and evolution in the world of gaming called GPUOpen.  As the name implies, the idea is to use an open source mentality to drivers, libraries, SDKs and more to improve the relationship between AMD’s hardware and the gaming development ecosystem.

gpuopen-5.jpg

When the current generation of consoles was first announced, AMD was riding a wave of positive PR that it hadn’t felt in many years. Because AMD Radeon hardware was at the root of the PlayStation 4 and the Xbox One, game developers would become much more adept at programming for AMD’s GCN architecture and that would waterfall down to PC gamers. At least, that was the plan. In practice though I think you’d be hard pressed to find any analyst to put their name on a statement claiming that proclamation from AMD actually transpired. It just hasn’t happened – but that does not mean that it still can’t if all the pieces fall into place.

gpuopen-7.jpg

The issue that AMD, NVIDIA, and game developers have to work around is a divided development ecosystem. While on the console side programmers tend to have very close to the metal access on CPU and GPU hardware, that hasn’t been the case with PCs until very recently. AMD was the first to make moves in this area with the Mantle API but now we have DirectX 12, a competing low level API, that will have much wider reach than Mantle or Vulkan (what Mantle has become).

AMD also believes, as do many developers, that a “black box” development environment for tools and effects packages is having a negative effect on the PC gaming ecosystem. The black box mentality means that developers don’t have access to the source code of some packages and thus cannot tweak performance and features to their liking.

Continue reading our overview of the new GPUOpen initiative from the Radeon Technologies Group!!

Pushing the ASUS STRIX R9 380X DirectCU II OC to the limit

Subject: Graphics Cards | December 14, 2015 - 08:55 PM |
Tagged: amd, asus, STRIX R9 380X DirectCU II OC, overclock

Out of the box the ASUS STRIX R9 380X OC has a top GPU speed of 1030MHz and memory at 5.7GHz, enough to outperform a stock GTX 960 4GB at 1440p but not enough to provide satisfactory performance at that resolution.  After spending some time with the card, [H]ard|OCP determined that the best overclock they could coax out of this particular GPU was 1175MHz and 6.5GHz, so they set about testing the performance at 1440p again.  To make it fair they also overclocked their STRIX GTX 960 OC 4GB to 1527MHz and 8GHz.  Read the full review for the detailed results, you will see that overclocking your 380X does really increase the value you get for your money.

1450065721TtW76q7G9J_1_1.gif

"We take the new ASUS STRIX R9 380X DirectCU II OC based on AMD's new Radeon R9 380X GPU and overclock this video card to its highest potential. We'll compare performance in six games, including Fallout 4, to a highly overclocked ASUS GeForce GTX 960 4GB video card and find out who dominates 1440p gaming."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP