Subject: Storage

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction

With newer and faster SSDs coming to market, we should not forget those capable controllers of yesteryear. There are plenty of folks out there cranking out products based on controllers that were until very recently the king of the hill. Competition is great for the market, and newer product launches have driven down the cost of the older SandForce 2281 SATA 6Gb/sec controller. ADATA makes a product based on this controller, and it's high time we gave it a look:

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The ADATA XPG SX900 launched mid last year, and was ADATA's first crack at the eXtended capacity variant of the SandForce firmware. This traded off some of the spare area in the interest of more capacity for the consumer.

Read on for the full review!

ADATA puts out the second version of their XPG Gaming RAM

Subject: Memory | November 20, 2012 - 07:44 PM |
Tagged: adata, DDR3-2400

For DDR3-2400 the Dual Channel ADATA XPG Gaming Series 8GB kit has decent timings @ 11-13-13-35.  Neoseeker's testing was not without problems however as Windows refused to boot at the full 2400MHz on their MSI Big Bang XPower II, instead they had to run at 2133MHz though the timings were tightened to 10.13.13.31 1T.  Performance fell in line with other similar kits at that speed, perhaps not at the top of the pack but certainly in the running.  They are out of stock at NewEgg, but you might be able to lay your hands on these fancy green DIMMs from another retailer.

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"ADATA hopes to join the ranks of the big boys in the gaming memory market with their XPG Gaming v2.0 series of memory kits. We review the DDR3-2400 8GB dual channel kit and put head to head against the likes of G.Skill's Ripjaws Z, Patriot's Viper III and the Corsair Dominator GT to see how well it can compete."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Adata CEO Claims RAM Prices To Climb Early Next Year

Subject: Memory | December 23, 2011 - 04:10 PM |
Tagged: supply, ram, price increase, nand, dram market, adata

Computer enthusiasts and OEMs alike have been living the dream of extremely cheap RAM modules; however, Adata CEO Simon Chen believes that the dream may be close to ending. In 2012, the DRAM manufacturers will start to cut production such that they are reducing supply and thus can charge more than they currently can (they have been producing DRAM consistently over the past couple years such that there has been more than enough supply and thus a lower cost). After the holiday season, PC OEMs will start to replenish their inventories and when they do, they will be increasing inventories to a months supply instead of a two week supply.

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Chen notes that the four major manufacturers of DRAM chips including Elpida Memory, Hynix Semiconductor, Micron Technology, and Powerchip Technology have suffered from selling the chips at such reduced prices for so long. While DRAM chips produced on older manufacturing processes may still be sold below the cost of production, newer DRAM manufactured on the 30nm process "will rebound from the current bottom level to a level above cash-flow production cost."

In addition to the reduced production and newer process, the demand for DRAM in general is expected to decrease due to the rising popularity of mobile computers, Chen notes. Further, the decrease in desktop DRAM demand is balanced out by increased demand for server memory from data centers purchasing additional RAM direct from the manufacturers as the server OEMs charge a hefty premium for RAM. Due to the shake up in the industry, "many makers of DRAM modules have shifted business operation to other areas" like ruggedized memory and to producing NAND flash chips for SSDs.

Admittedly, the memory makers are walking a fine line between spinning down production and being accused of price fixing; however, the ride has been a good one for consumers for a while now and the manufacturers are likely getting tired of the razor thing profit margins. Chen's analysis of the situation may be correct in light of that fact, the new process technology allowing for better yields combined with generally lower production while the big OEMs will be buying up more RAM for their own inventories may well spell the end of being able to impulse buy tons of DDR3 RAM! What are your thoughts on both Chen's analysis of the price increase and the industry itself- do you think prices are likely to go up next year?

Source: Digitimes