Netgear Launches Budget R6100 Router With 802.11ac Wi-Fi

Subject: General Tech | July 3, 2013 - 07:37 AM |
Tagged: r6100, netgear, 802.11n, 802.11ac, 5GHz wifi, 2.4GHz

Netgear recently launched a new budget 802.11ac wireless router called the R6100. The new R6100 joins the existing 802.11ac family, but at a much lower price point. It is available now with an MSRP of $99.

The Netgear R6100 closely resembles the angled square R6200 with a glossy black finish and blue accents. The router features simultaneous dual-band 2.4GHz 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi and 5GHz 802.11ac radios. The theoretical maximum throughput is 300 Mbps on the 2.4GHz 802.11n and 867 Mbps on the 5GHz (802.11ac) band.

Netgear R6100 80211_ac WiFi router with 100Mbps Ethernet.jpg

In many ways, the R6100 is identical to the R6200. However, in order to get the price below $100, Netgear cut out the Gigabit Ethernet ports used in the R6200 in favor of five 10/100 ports (one WAN, four LAN).

In addition to the networking hardware, the R6100 includes guest network support, AirPrint wireless printing support (for Apple devices), EZ Mobile Connect technology which allows user to connect to the network by scanning a QR code, a USB port for connecting a hard drive, a DLNA server for streaming media to DLNA-compatible devices, and live parental controls.

Overall, the Netgear R6100 looks to be a decent router that offers up a cheap transition path to the latest 802.11ac Wi-Fi standard while simultaneously supporting legacy devices. It should work well with wireless devices, including the new Galaxy SIV and HTC One smartphones as well as motherboards with bundled ac mini-PCIe cards. On the other hand, the loss of Gigabit Ethernet ports is a hard pill to swallow for enthusiasts. If you use wired connections on some of your machines and transfer large files, i would recommend saving up the extra $50 and instead getting the $149 R6200 (or staying with your current router if you do not plan to use devices with 802.11ac hardware, of course).

Source: Netgear

PowerCloud Systems Kickstarting New Skydog Router With Intuitive Management Software

Subject: Networking | April 15, 2013 - 02:28 AM |
Tagged: skydog, gigabit router, 5GHz wifi

A new piece of networking hardware from PowerCloud Systems recently emerged on popular crowd-funding site Kickstarter. Aimed at consumers, the Skydog router is paired with a web interface and mobile application that makes managing your home network extremely accessible.

The Skydog router hardware itself has already passed regulatory certifications, and the super early bird backers will each get one of 250 pre-production units. The router features five Gigabit Ethernet ports (one port is for the WAN), a USB port, and a dual-band 802.11n Wi-Fi radio. The Wi-Fi radio can operate on the 2.4GHz and 5GHz bands simultaneously, and has a maximum rated throughput of 300Mbps per band. The router chassis measures 17 x 11 x 2.5cm and includes a number of blue indicator LEDs on the top-front edge. The USB port is not currently supported, but is there for future feature updates.

The Skydog Router and Accompanying Web and Mobile application for network management.jpg

Where Skydog differentiates itself from the crowd is in the software. After connecting the router to your modem and computers, you can log into the web interface. It will prompt you for either a Google or Skydog account, and then will reportedly automatically configure itself. The software supports Quality of Service (QoS) features that will allow you to prioritize certain traffic and/or to give bandwidth priority to certain users. The web interface will show you network statistics, connected devices, device signal strength, track and notify users of network issues (for example, the internet going down) via the Skydog mobile app, and track and restrict the websites users visit. Further, the administrator can set up schedules on a per-user basis. The schedules can restrict usage by approved time slices and by bandwidth limits. It will notify users when they are approaching the allotted time or bandwidth limit via the mobile app. Real time notifications include ISP connection issues, guests requesting access to the network, and the above-mentioned bandwidth limit notifications.

Skydog Router Web Interface.jpg

According to the Kickstarter FAQ, the Skydog Home Network (which consists of the router and management software) will cost approximately $149 for three years or $199 for five years without a monthly fee.  The wording suggests that a model with a lower hardware cost but monthly charge might also be available. The cloud service is a bit worrisome, and I'm not sure if I like the idea of essentially renting the router via monthly or yearly fees. This router is not going to be for everyone, but it does have some useful and inventive features for families. This would be a router that I could see the various ISPs offering up as a rental device and that I might set up for my friends or relatives with kids so that they could easily manage the network and restrict the kids access to certain times of the day and age appropriate sites.

With 29 days left in the Kickstarter, the project has 543 backers, and $51,905 pledged of the 75,000 goal. It certainly looks like it is going to be funded, and I hope that the Kickstarter leads to a successful retail product launch.

Source: Kickstarter

Computex: ASUS G75VW Allegedly World’s First 802.11ac 5GHz Laptop

Subject: Mobile | June 7, 2012 - 01:54 AM |
Tagged: wireless, gaming laptop, gaming, computex, ASUS ROG, asus, 802.11ac, 5GHz wifi

Earlier today we posted a couple of teaser photos showing off some of ASUS’ upcoming products. One of the devices was a gaming laptop called the ASUS G75. Engadget has managed to get their hands on some more information regarding a variant of the G75 – the G75VW. According to the site, the gaming laptop is rocking an Intel Ivy Bridge processor, GeForce GTX 670M, and DDR3 memory (known because of the CPU used). That hardware is then powering a 1080p display, which the GTX 670M should have no problem driving but is a bit depressing to see on a high end laptop of this size (approximately 17”). The real kicker though is in the wireless card that it is allegedly packing: an 802.11ac card.

ROG_G75_Gaming_Notebook.JPG

The ASUS G75 gaming laptop

Engadget states that although the information sheet next to the laptop at ASUS’ Computex booth did not list any 802.11ac compatibility, wireless chip maker Broadcom (manufacturer of chips that are used in many wireless routers and NICs) has stated that it does in fact have an 802.11ac NIC in it. Senior Vice President Michael Hurlston told members of the press at Computex 2012 that the ASUS G75VW is the “World’s first 5G Wi-Fi laptop.” He further stated that the computer would be arriving in the hands of consumers “very shortly.”

Interesting stuff, and although the “5G Wi-Fi” – so called because it is the fifth generation of consumer grade Wi-Fi (though not the 5th gen if you count all iterations of the wireless 802.11 standards) – is not yet official and set in stone, it is very close and I would not be surprised to see the technology in a laptop like this particular ASUS at this point in the game.

And to think that I just got done upgrading my network to Gigabit Ethernet and 802.11n about two months ago! Even so, I’m excited for the upcoming standard because I want to test its usefulness in getting live TV from my CableCARD tuner to the living room and Katy’s wireless laptop without stuttering – something even wireless N with MIMO can’t do with devices in the same room. So far, the only thing stable enough has been wired Cat5e Ethernet (both 100Mbps and 1000Mbps hardware seem to work without issues). And because it’s proving difficult to get a wired connection from the router to the TV (Xbox 360 used as Windows Media Extender), I’m ready to try out some 802.11ac stuff to see if it can really deliver on the increased bandwidth!

Source: Engadget