IDF 2013: Promise Technology Shows Off Thunderbolt 2 Equipped Storage

Subject: Storage | September 13, 2013 - 04:23 PM |
Tagged: Thunderbolt 2, SANlink 2, raid, promise, 4k

Promise Technology has announced that it is launching new storage solutions with Intel's new Thunderbolt 2 interface. Shown off at IDF 2013, the storage products include the Pegasus 2 series and SANLink 2 Thunderbolt 2 to 8G Fiber Channel bridge. The Pegasus 2 series is a RAID 5 external storage array that connects to Windows or Mac machines using Thunderbolt 2. The SANLink 2 bridge product allows users to connect a PC using Thunderbolt 2 to Promise Technology's VTrak or VTrak A-Class shared SAN storage.

Promise Technology Logo.jpg

The storage products are aimed mainly at professional video editors that are working with 4K content. According to Promise Technology, the 20Gbps bi-directional Thunderbolt 2 connection enables video editors to simultaneously transfer and display 4K video content.

Promise Technology VTrak A-Class Storage.jpg

Promise Technology CEO James Lee was quoted as saying:

"With the industry now poised for the widespread adoption of 4K video, the Pegasus2 Series with Thunderbolt 2 technology will revolutionize how video creators are managing 4K workflows in addition to delivering unprecedented performance to artists and enthusiasts who love to create captivating content."

Both the Pegasus2 and SANLink2 products with Thunderbolt 2 will be available in Fall 2013 for so-far undisclosed prices. The full press blast is below, for more information.

IFA 2013: Panasonic Launches 20" ToughPad 4K UT-MB5 Tablet For Business Users

Subject: General Tech | September 9, 2013 - 01:49 AM |
Tagged: tablet, Panasonic, ifa 2013, 4k

At the IFA 2013 trade show in Berlin, Germany, Panasonic is showing off a prototype 20” tablet with 4K high resolution display called the ToughPad 4K UT-MB5. The tablet is aimed at professional users in sales and marketing as well as artists, architects, and engineers. The UT-MB5 will come in two models: standard and performance. The performance SKU features a faster Intel Core i5 vPro processor and NVIDIA discrete graphics versus the standard version.

The Panasonic ToughPad 4K UT-MB5 is a 20” tablet with a carbon fiber case that measures 12.5mm thick and weighs 2.35 kg (5.18 lbs) for the standard version. The performance version weighs slightly more at 2.7 kg (5.95 lbs). The front of the tablet is dominated by a 20” 4K IPS display with a resolution of 3840 x 2560 (230 PPI), aspect ratio of 15:10, and 176-degree viewing angles. Above the display is a 720p webcam. The UT-MB5 has USB 3.0, SD card, optical smart card, and headphone ports. Panasonic further offers a desktop cradle that allows users to use the tablet as a desktop system by connecting a wireless keyboard and mouse. The desktop dock also expands the IO options to include HDMI output and an Ethernet port. The tablet is ruggedized and rated to be able to withstand drops up to 76cm while turned on.

Panasonic ToughPad 4K UT-MB5.jpg

Internal hardware on the 20” ToughPad includes an unspecified Intel Core i5 vPro processor, discrete NVIDIA Geforce graphics, up to 8GB of RAM, a 128GB (standard) or 256GB (performance) SSD, and Windows 8.1 Pro. There are also wireless radios for 802.11n Wi-Fi and Bluetooth.

Panasonic also provides an optional digitizer called the Electronic Touch Pen. The custom pen connects to the tablet using Bluetooth and uses an infrared camera that can reportedly identify every pixel on the high resolution display. The pen has 2048 levels of pressure sensitivity and can also report angle of tilt.

Panasonic rates the UT-MB5 tablet at around 2 hours of battery life off of a full charge. The company sees the device as a portable touchscreen rather than a mobile tablet, and at 20” and 5+ pounds it is more of a desktop replacement than a mobile device.

The Standard SKU will be available in November for GBP 3,335 (~$5,217) in Germany and Europe. There is no word on US availability yet, however. Panasonic has stated that the higher-end Performance UT-MB5's pricing and availability will be announced at a later date. In the meantime, users can check out the standard version at the IFA show in Berlin in Hall 5.2/101.

It looks like a neat device that should be a hit for professional artists, architects, engineers, and business users alike. It comes with a premium price tag but the display and accurate digitizer is likely worth it!

Source: Panasonic

HDMI 2.0 Announced: 4K at 60Hz, Auto Lipsync, and more.

Subject: General Tech | September 8, 2013 - 05:19 PM |
Tagged: HDMI 2.0, hdmi, 4k

3840 and 2160 are common numbers around this site or at least they have been over the last half year. You might be surprised to find we have been on the 4K bandwagon since 2011 when Ryan was given some time with the EIZO DuraVision FDH3601 at a vendor presentation. Sure, that $30,000 behemoth was designed for medical imaging and air traffic control stations, but it can run DiRT 3 like a champ. But, even now, 60Hz at those resolutions require at least two cables working in unison.

hdmi.jpg

HDMI 2.0, recently announced, has been designed to achieve single-cable 4K at 60 progressive frames per second.

The specification maintains the same cable configuration as HDMI 1.4. Devices which support HDMI 2.0 can be connected, at full functionality, with standard "category 2" (marketing term "high speed") cables. Currently available "high speed" cables will not need to be replaced. The devices, on the other hand, must support the higher standard but that only makes sense because... well... why would you need the cable, otherwise?

HDMI 2.0 drives a higher frequency, 600MHz up from 340 MHz, to deliver substantially more bandwidth, 18Gbps up from 10.2Gbps, than HDMI 1.4. The extra bits can be used for 32 channel audio at 1536kHz sample rates as well as the aforementioned 2160p/60 video link.

A helpful feature for many home theater enthusiasts is "dynamic synchronization of video and audio streams". To my understand, this means that end-users will not need to fiddle with latency settings on their speaker systems as the devices will properly negotiate the delay themselves.

I have not been too much of a fan of HDMI licensing requirements and restrictions, but this release is definitely major version-worthy. The compliance test is expected in late 2013. The devices, however, are what most of us care about and, well, that depends on those manufacturers.

4k alignment from a free partitioning tool

Subject: Storage | August 12, 2013 - 05:37 PM |
Tagged: ssd, partition, MiniTool Partition Wizard Home Edition, 4k

SSDs and modern OSes no longer use the old 512 byte LBA alignment, or at least they don't need to and in the case of SSDs offer larger disk size and faster performance.  However many people are not aware of 4k alignment nor how to check if their SSD is aligned nor what to do even if they do know it is not aligned.  Hardware.Info put together a short article on the steps to verify if your SSD is aligned as well as covering a free partitioning tool called MiniTool Partition Wizard Home Edition which will help you align your SSD as well as other tasks common to partitioning software.  As with any major changes being made at this low a level, do realize that this could cause data loss, but aligning those sectors is a great IDEMA.

free-download-minitool-partition-wizard-8.0-home-edition-portable.jpg

"When you copy the contents of a hard disk from a PC or laptop to an SSD you have to make sure that the placement of the partitions corresponds to the underlying hardware structure. The same is true for the latest generation of hard disks. Today we'll discuss what this so-called '4k alignment' really means and what you can do in order to prevent a decrease in performance."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Extreme Windows, Extreme Eyefinity, 11,520 x 2160 Gaming

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards, Displays | July 25, 2013 - 07:32 PM |
Tagged: eyefinity, crossfire, 4k

Sharp recently sampled a few of their 32" 4K monitors to Microsoft's Extreme Windows. The blog, known for editorializing what enthusiasts can do with Microsoft products, combined three 3840 x 2160 monitors into a 3x1 Eyefinity configuration at 60 Hz; the screen, itself, measures about 7 feet diagonally. This configuration, unlike the already-supported three-display 30 Hz and single-display 60Hz 4K modes, required AMD to develop a customized driver before Sharp's repo-team reclaimed their $15,000 worth of monitors.

They had a day until their door was to be knocked.

4k-eyefinity-01.jpg

The system, three Radeon HD 7970s in Crossfire, successfully drove... they were playing Dirt 3, by the way... the three monitors at 60 Hz with between 62 and 70, of software recorded, FPS. 11,520 x 2160, at 60 Hz, requires 1.5 billion colors to be calculated within a second of animation; that is 1.5 gigapixels. Ignore, for a moment, stutter caused by including Crossfire with an Eyefinity setup. Every calculation, whether properly drawn to the monitor or not is, and must be, performed; 1.5 gigapixels is impressive and an accomplishment for Radeon hardware.

4k-eyefinity-02.jpg

Lastly, I need to call out drama as I see it: power supplies. It is not hard to find a PSU which can support a three-GPU system and no reason for it to be hanging outside the case. It might give off the bleeding-edge appearance, but this is not arc welding. If they really were concerned, they could have picked up a higher capacity device from the shelf of a local component reseller.

Podcast #261 - ASUS PQ321Q 4K Monitor Review, Samsung 840 Evo details, Kepler meets Tegra, and more!

Subject: General Tech | July 25, 2013 - 02:36 PM |
Tagged: video, tegra 5, Samsung, pq321q, podcast, logan, kepler, asus, 840 evo, 4k

PC Perspective Podcast #261 - 07/25/2013

Join us this week as we discuss our ASUS PQ321Q 4K Monitor Review, Samsung 840 Evo details, Kepler meets Tegra, and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Josh Walrath, Jeremy Hellstrom and Allyn Malventano

Program length: 1:12:20

  1. Week in Review:
  2. News items of interest:
  3. Hardware/Software Picks of the Week:
    1. Jeremy: Got nothing so random mod
    2. Allyn: A sinusesectomy
    3. Morry: When Artic Silver just isn't good enough - IC Diamond Thermal Paste
  4. 1-888-38-PCPER or podcast@pcper.com
  5. Closing/outro

 

Dell Unveils UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD Monitor With 3840x2160 IGZO Panel

Subject: Displays | July 24, 2013 - 03:59 PM |
Tagged: ultrasharp 32, ultrasharp, ultra hdtv, UHD, igzo, dell, 4k

Dell showed off a new Ultra HD (UHD) monitor called the UltraSharp 32 at SIGGRAPH 2013 this week. The new monitor has a 32" IGZO, or Indium Gallium Zinc Oxide, panel, which is a technology developed by Sharp that allows for smaller pixels or faster reaction times. (A similar panel is used in the ASUS PQ321Q that Ryan recently reviewed.). The panel has a 4K resolution of 3840 x 2160 and comes with a matte finish. Dell claims that its new 4K monitor supports up to 1.07 billion colors.

Dell UltraSharp 32 Ultra HD.jpg

The monitor is fitted to an aluminum stand that allows for height ajustment. The monitor itself is rather thin, but still manages to fit an SD card reader on the left-hand side. The rest of the ports are located on the rear of the monitor, however. IO on the Dell UltraSharp 32 includes:

  • 1 x DisplayPort
  • 1 x Mini DisplayPort
  • 3 x USB
  • 1 x SD

Unfortunately, other specifications such as refresh rate are unknown. Dell has not yet released pricing information, but has stated that the UltraSharp 32 will be available in Q4 of this year. I think this is good for consumers as it should help bring 4k monitor prices down as competition heats up between the various manufacturers using these IGZO panels.

Engadget was on hand at SIGGRAPH and managed to snap several photos of the new monitor which are worth checking out.

Source: Engadget

Video Perspective: SEIKI SE39UY04 39-in 4K 3840x2160 TV Unboxing and Overview

Subject: General Tech, Displays | July 20, 2013 - 11:36 PM |
Tagged: video, seiki, SE39UY04, hdtv, displays, 4k, 3840x2160

After the interest in our overview of the SEIKI 50-in 4K HDTV last April, we got word that SEIKI was making a smaller version of the same television.  The SE39UY04 is now available and sells for just under $700 at various online retailers and is surely piquing the interest of many PC users and enthusiasts with the combination of a 3840x2160 resolution and 39-in screen size.

In nearly every way, this 39-in model is identical to the 50-in version with the exception of size and pixel density.  Having just recently published a review of the ASUS PQ321Q 4K monitor on PC Perspective I can now report that the move from 60 Hz screens to 30 Hz screens, even at this kind of resolution and screen size, is very apparent. 

Below is our initial video unboxing and overview of the new SEIKI SE39UY04.  Check it out and leave us any questions or ideas below!

Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: ASUS

Specifications and Overview

Talk to most PC enthusiasts today, be they gamers or developers, and ask them what technology they are most interested in for the next year or so and you will most likely hear about 4K somewhere in the discussion.  While the world of consumer electronics and HDTV has been stuck in the rut of 1080p for quite some time now, computers, smartphones and tablets are racing in the direction of higher resolutions and higher pixel densities.  4K is a developing standard that pushes screen resolutions to 4K x 2K pixels and if you remove the competing options discussion (3840x2160 versus 4096x2160 are the most prominent) this move is all good news for the industry.

I first dove into the area of 4K displays when I purchased the SEIKI SE50UY04 50-in 4K TV in April for $1300 when it popped up online.  The TV showed up days later and we did an unboxing and preview of the experience and I was blown away by the quality difference by moving to a 3840x2160 screen, even with other caveats to be had.  It was a 30 Hz panel, half a typical LCD computer display today, it had limited functionality and it honestly wasn't the best quality TV I had ever used.  But it was 4K, it was inexpensive and it was available. 

It was hard to beat at the time but the biggest drawback was the lack of 60 Hz support, the ability for the screen to truly push 60 frames per second to the panel.  This caused some less than desirable results with Windows usage and even in gaming where visual tearing was more prominent when Vsync was disabled.  But a strength of this design was that it only required a single HDMI connection and would work with basically any current graphics systems.  I did some Frame Rating game performance testing at 4K and found that GPU horsepower was definitely a limiting factor. 

IMG_9767.JPG

Today I follow up our initial unboxing and preview of the ASUS PQ321Q 4K monitor with a more thorough review and summary of our usage results.  There is quite a bit that differs between our experience with the SEIKI and the ASUS panels and it is more than just the screen sizes.

Continue reading our review of the ASUS PQ321Q 4K 60 Hz Tiled Monitor!!

NVIDIA Releases 326.19 Beta Driver, Adds Support for 4K Tiled Displays!

Subject: Graphics Cards, Displays | July 18, 2013 - 08:16 PM |
Tagged: pq321q, PQ321, nvidia, drivers, asus, 4k

It would appear that NVIDIA was paying attention to our recent live stream where we unboxed and setup our new ASUS PQ321Q 4K 3840x2160 monitor.  During our setup on the AMD and NVIDIA based test beds I noticed (and the viewers saw) some less than desirable results during initial configuration.  The driver support was pretty clunky, we had issues with reliability of booting and switching between SST and MST (single and multi stream transport) modes caused the card some issue as well. 

4kdriver.png

Today NVIDIA released a new R326 driver, 326.19 beta, that improves performance in a couple of games but more importantly, adds support for "tiled 4K displays."  If you don't know what that means, you aren't alone.  A tiled display is one that is powered by multiple heads and essentially acts as multiple screens in a single housing.  The ASUS PQ321Q monitor that we have in house, and the Sharp PN-K321, are tiled displays that use DisplayPort 1.2 MST technology to run at 3840x2160 @ 60 Hz. 

It is great to see NVIDIA reacting quickly to new technologies and to our issues from just under a week gone by.  If you have either of these displays, be sure to give the new driver a shot and let me know your results!

Source: NVIDIA