Epson's new 3D glasses

Subject: General Tech | May 13, 2015 - 01:56 PM |
Tagged: Moverio BT-200, epson, 3d glasses

Epson has teamed up with NGRAIN to create the Moverio BT-200 smart glasses for use in industrial design and repair.  The glasses are connected to a controller to minimize the weight of the actual glasses as well as allowing you control options on the 3D view you see through the glasses.  The Register were not overly impressed with the image nor the interface but could certainly see the usefulness in the demonstrations that were conducted.  One benefit the glasses do offer is dual usage, they can be used both to show 3D images as well as augmented reality overlays when looking at physical objects, allowing to use the interface you prefer.

epson-control-unit.jpg

"You may be really looking forward to 3D glasses but based on the latest tech giant's efforts, it may be some time.

Today we tried out Epson Moverio BT-200 smart glasses at IoT World in San Francisco and were left… underwhelmed."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

One spectacle to rule them all ... universal 3D glasses

Subject: Systems | June 25, 2012 - 06:14 PM |
Tagged: active shutter, 3d display, 3d glasses

XPAND’s YOUniversal Electronic 3D Eyewear is intended to be compatible with all IR and RF standards for 3D displays, allowing you to get multiple glasses for a group that wants to experience 3D or so that you can pick up a 3D display without worrying about glasses.  Of course, the trick with this is that you need to provide proper performance with all models of TV, which these glasses did until they encountered Missing Remotes' Samsung plasma screen.  While they did recognize the signal they fell out of sync far too often for comfort, but that might be fixed in a future update.  If you need a spare pair of 3D glasses that will work with your active shutter 3D TV and in movie theatres which use XPAND 3D, then these are not a bad choice thanks to their flexibility.

MR_sw_0.jpg

"We last visited the topic of universal active 3D glasses technology with our XPAND X103 review. With the introduction of the Full HD 3D Glasses standard in 2012 stereoscopic 3D products, the display and eyewear industry have matured away from the mish-mash of proprietary communication mechanisms. Standard-compliant products can utilize radio frequency (RF) and/or infrared (IR) for the communication link between displays and glasses. In theory, any vendor’s glasses complying with the standard will work with any standard-compliant display (so long as each product has the same logo, e.g. “Full HD 3D RF” or “Full HD 3D IR”)."

Here are some more Systems articles from around the web:

Systems