One spectacle to rule them all ... universal 3D glasses

Subject: Systems | June 25, 2012 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: active shutter, 3d display, 3d glasses

XPAND’s YOUniversal Electronic 3D Eyewear is intended to be compatible with all IR and RF standards for 3D displays, allowing you to get multiple glasses for a group that wants to experience 3D or so that you can pick up a 3D display without worrying about glasses.  Of course, the trick with this is that you need to provide proper performance with all models of TV, which these glasses did until they encountered Missing Remotes' Samsung plasma screen.  While they did recognize the signal they fell out of sync far too often for comfort, but that might be fixed in a future update.  If you need a spare pair of 3D glasses that will work with your active shutter 3D TV and in movie theatres which use XPAND 3D, then these are not a bad choice thanks to their flexibility.

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"We last visited the topic of universal active 3D glasses technology with our XPAND X103 review. With the introduction of the Full HD 3D Glasses standard in 2012 stereoscopic 3D products, the display and eyewear industry have matured away from the mish-mash of proprietary communication mechanisms. Standard-compliant products can utilize radio frequency (RF) and/or infrared (IR) for the communication link between displays and glasses. In theory, any vendor’s glasses complying with the standard will work with any standard-compliant display (so long as each product has the same logo, e.g. “Full HD 3D RF” or “Full HD 3D IR”)."

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ASUS offers an all in one NVIDIA 3D display package

Subject: Displays | March 13, 2012 - 09:58 AM |
Tagged: VG278H, tn lcd, asus, 3d display, 27

For those who would like to take advantage of NVIDIA's 3D gaming technology, a good place to start is the ASUS VG278H 27" 3D display.  While it is $650 it comes with NVIDIA's 3D Vision 2 glasses and 3D LightBoost thanks to the LED back lighting.  In this case a TN monitor makes sense as it gives a quick response rate and the viewing angle matters less as your 3D glasses also have a very limited sweet spot.  Hardware Canucks did feel that 27" is a bit large for 1080p resolution but that is part of what keeps the price low compared to other 3D displays and they did notice crosstalk, a problem which plagues many 3D displays.  If you feel the need to game in 3D you could do worse than the ASUS VG278H.

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"Being one of the first 120Hz capable 27" monitors, the ASUS VG278H caused a stir when it was first announced alongside NVIDIA’s 3D Vision 2. Even though it incorporates a TN panel and a resolution of only 1920 x 1080, its price is low enough to be tempting for anyone that wants stereoscopic capabilities without breaking the bank."

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Multimonitor, multidimensional gaming

Subject: General Tech | January 25, 2012 - 02:16 PM |
Tagged: gaming, eyefinity, nvidia surround, 3d display

The Tech Report tackles multi-monitor gaming in 3D with their latest technique of measuring graphical performance.  Frame time seems to be very much present with some hardware when you attempt to play with this type of display but it seems the overall effect on your enjoyment is variable.  When testing Deus Ex they found less instances of high frame time than with Battlefield 3 but found they noticed the impact more on Deus Ex than BF3.  There are a lot of variables to account for in this overview, not only the differences between AMD and NVIDIA's implementation of the technology but also the differences between active shutter and passive glasses.  Read on to see if you should wait for Microsoft to include 3D support in DirectX or if you can dive in right away.

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"Join us as we slip on the funny glasses to assess the current state of stereoscopic 3D gaming on the PC."

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HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 11:40 AM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.

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Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

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Viewsonic attempts to entice you to buy their 3D display

Subject: Displays | September 13, 2011 - 10:19 AM |
Tagged: viewsonic, 3d display, V3D245

The Viewsonic V3D245 is a 24" LED monitor with a 1080p resolution that will let you play in 3D without needing to pick up extra peripherals.  The display will work equally well with both PCs and consoles and most importantly the active glasses are included with the monitor.  You provide the signal and the display will give you 3D gaming.  Drop by Ars Technica for a closer look.

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"That being said, ViewSonic wants to make you a deal. If you give them $500, they'll give you a 24" monitor for your PC and gaming consoles that does 3D like a champ. There is nothing extra to hook up, nothing to be added; it's an all-in-one solution that does 3D as well as anything I've seen on the market. At $500, this display isn't cheap, but the quality is such that you'll be happy about spending the money."

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Source: Ars Technica

Need a 3D display, mon? Try Zalman's Trimon

Subject: Displays | August 16, 2011 - 09:14 AM |
Tagged: zalman, 3d display

The Zalman Trimon ZM-M240W is the latest 3D display from a company once best known for pretty heatsinks.  They've preferred using passive glasses to create the illusion of depth on their monitors, something which attracts people who do not want to invest around $100 in a pair of active shutter glasses that may or may not work with some TVs and possibly give you a headache for the effort of trying.  X-bit Labs certainly approved of both the pricing and the lack of flicker from Zalman's new Trimon but pointed out that there are serious drawbacks in the viewing angle with passive glasses.  Check out their full review here.

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"Zalman continues on their own unique path releasing 3D monitors bundled with inexpensive and non-flickering passive glasses. They have indisputable strengths as well as bottlenecks. Read our review to find out more."

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Source: X-Bit Labs

ViewSonic Drives Display Innovation with New 3D Vision LED Monitor

Subject: Displays | August 1, 2011 - 10:11 AM |
Tagged: led lcd, 3d display

WALNUT, Calif. – August 1, 2011 – ViewSonic Corp., a leading global provider of computing, consumer electronics and communications solutions, today continues its leadership in display innovation with the new V3D245 – a 24-inch 3D, full HD (1080p) LED monitor that includes a built-in NVIDIA 3D Vision wireless emitter and NVIDIA 3D Vision glasses.

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Combining world-leading LED technology with extraordinary power-saving performance, this 24-inch (23.6-inch vis.) monitor offers a stunning 120Hz frame refresh rate and ultra-fast 2ms video response time, and HDMI 1.4 input making it ideal for delivering a truly immersive 2D and 3D entertainment and gaming experience. Paired with a 1920x1080 full HD resolution, 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio and 300 nits high brightness, users can expect great color accuracy and picture detail for unsurpassed 3D image quality.

The integrated NVIDIA 3D Vision wireless emitter gives users the flexibility to connect to an NVIDIA GeForce-equipped PC to play more than 550 3D games in full 1080p, 60 fps resolution, view 3D videos and photos, and stream 3D web content. Users could also choose to connect directly to the latest Blu-ray 3D players or PS3 consoles via the standard built-in HDMI 1.4 input. Additionally, the integrated two-watt SRS Premium Sound audio speakers provides consumers the ultimate multimedia entertainment display.

“Gamers, movie buffs and photo enthusiasts will love moving up to 3D. And there’s no better way to do so than with ViewSonic’s V3D245 3D monitor, with its built-in NVIDIA 3D Vision technology, which produces the most immersive and crystal clear 3D images,” said Phil Eisler, general manager of 3D Vision at NVIDIA. “Set-up is quick and easy. Simply connect the monitor to your NVIDIA GeForce graphics card, put on the included NVIDIA 3D Vision glasses, and start enjoying games, videos and photos in a whole new way.”

NVIDIA’s 3D Vision drivers support more than 550 video games in 3D, with more being continually added. In addition, 3DVisionLive.com hosts hundreds of 3D videos and thousands of 3D photos that can be seen with a free web browser and a 3D Vision system. YouTube also supports 3D Vision, with thousands of videos now available for viewing in stereoscopic 3D.

“Whether for work, play or media enjoyment, our new V3D245 monitor offers the highest level of compatibility with both PC- and console-based 3D content, and is ideal for delivering an incredible 3D experience,” said Erik Willey, LCD monitor and PC product marketing manager, ViewSonic. “By pairing our exclusive 120Hz, LED-based 3D technology with NVIDIA 3D Vision technology, we are able to deliver a new world-class level of performance that will shape the future of 3D gaming and entertainment.”

The V3D245 comes standard with ViewSonic’s strongest pixel performance guarantee and 3-year limited warranty. ViewSonic’s V3D245 3D monitor and included pair of NVIDIA 3D Vision active stereo 3D glasses and will be available in North America during mid-to-late August for an ESP of $499.

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Source: ViewSonic

LG Unveils World's First Glasses-Free 3D LCD Display

Subject: Displays | July 16, 2011 - 07:54 AM |
Tagged: monitor, LG, lenticular display, 3d display, 3d

LG Electronics, maker of HD televisions, computer displays, and a myriad of consumer electronics devices unveiled a new glasses-free 3D monitor that claims to be the first display of its kind. Using a lenticular display and a built in webcam to automatically adjust the display by tracking eye movement in real time. Lenticular displays work by coating an otherwise 2D panel with an array of tiny lenses called lenticules that then direct light from the panel’s pixels into each eye. The brain then stitches the images together and interprets them as a 3D image. The passive 3D system (passive in the sense that active shutter glasses are not required) and eye tracking means that only one person will be able to experience the 3D effects at a time; however, that person will be able to view the image at a wider variety of viewing angles than otherwise possible without eye tracking.

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The 20" inch panel has been dubbed the DX2000, and will retail in Korea this month for $1,200 USD according to a LG press release. A wider release to other markets are expected later in the year, and the display model will be known as the D2000.

Source: Cnet Asia

Toshiba Satellite p755, at least the 3D isn't proprietary

Subject: Mobile | July 14, 2011 - 11:10 AM |
Tagged: toshiba, 3d display, 15.6 inch, sandybridge

It's yet another 3D laptop, as the only thing geekier that walking around staring at a notebook is to do so wearing big green NVIDIA glasses.  The arguments for and against 3D vision aside, this 15.6" 1366x768 TFT LED is powered by a 2.3GHz Core i5 with 6GB DDR3, a Geforce GT540M with 1GB dedicated VRAM and a Blue-ray drive.  Those features, especially the Blue-ray and 3D display help push the price over the $1000 mark.   The Inquirer had fun reviewing this laptop, but were not impressed with the low brightness in 3D mode and were very disappointed with the battery life.

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"THE SATELLITE P755 is one of Toshiba's top of the range laptops. It aims to offer the full entertainment and multimedia package with Nvidia's active shutter 3D technology built in.

The laptop is good looking with its silvery grey textured finish. We think it looks stylish without going over the top and the design should appeal to a range of tastes."

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Source: The Inquirer

Still in the market for a 3D display? Samsung has a set for you

Subject: Displays | July 8, 2011 - 10:36 AM |
Tagged: Samsung, 3d display, tn lcd, 1080p

Since the 3D market is not confusing enough Samsung has decided to implement their own way of displaying 3D images using shutter glasses, which is incompatible with NVIDIA's glasses.  On the plus side, as long as you have Samsung's glasses you will be able to display 3D from any source with any semi-modern graphics card.  The SyncMaster SA950 is a 1080x1920 TN LCD with a very reflective finish and comes with stylish active shutter glasses powered by a single lithium disk battery.  X-bit Labs put on the goggles and tried the 3D experience from both 3D sources and using the onboard processor to make 3D visuals out of 2D sources, with mixed but fairly positive results.

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"This time we are going to talk about a new 27-inch 3D monitor from Samsung that uses its own proprietary technologies for 3D imaging that work without drivers or any other additional software."

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Source: X-Bit Labs