Crucial's 16GB Ballistix Elite 2666MHz, great frequency at the cost of timings

Subject: Memory | July 23, 2015 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: ddr4-2666, crucial ballistix, 16GB

DDR4 has certainly ramped up the frequencies but as we have seen with previous generations of RAM, the timings tend to get looser as that frequency increases.  Take for example Crucial's 16GB DDR4-2666 kit which sports timings of CAS 16, tRCD 17, tRD 17 and tRFC 36.  Indeed to overclock the RAM to 2808MHz, Bjorn3D had to change the timings to 19-17-17-36, however at that speed it nosed slightly ahead of the Patriot kit running at 2800MHz @ 16-18-18-36 so tweaking this RAM can pay off and the Crucial Ballistix MOD Utility will let you know if you are getting into Kenny Loggins' areas.  At $170 it will not break the bank and it will beat out at least some of the competition in performance, albeit by a very slight margin.

ram.jpg

"In this review we are going to be looking at one of the many DDR4 modules that Crucial offers for the 2011v3 CPU platform: the 2666Mhz 16-17-17-36 16GBs DDR4 Ballistix Elite Memory. So step inside and see how this memory stacks up."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: Bjorn3D

G.Skill's Ripjaws 4; fast and relatively affordable memory for your Haswell-E system

Subject: Memory | April 27, 2015 - 04:45 PM |
Tagged: ddr4-3200, G.Skill, Ripjaws 4, 16GB

At $450 for 16GB of DDR4-3200, G.Skill's Ripjaws 4 kit is very well priced for DDR4 of that speed, especially if you like the active cooling fans.  This particular kit is has timings of 16-16-16-36 with a 2T command rate. It also requires an impressive 1.35V to hit full speed, well above the 1.2V specification but in line with many of the other DDR4 enthusiast kits.  Indeed when Hardware Canucks started their overclocking tests they raised that to 1.4V and managed a variety of tighter timings with reduced clock speed; worth noting is that all of those overclocks were successful when using a 1T command rate.  Check out their full review here and don't forget to sign up for our contest!

GSKILL_RIPJAWS4_DDR4-3200_27.jpg

"G.Skill's Ripjaws 4 DDR4-3200 16GB kit gives Haswell-E buyers an excellent combination of price, out-of-box performance and overclocking abilities. It has everything you could possibly want in a DDR4 kit."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Shave another couple of watts off your Kabini system

Subject: Memory | April 9, 2014 - 06:54 PM |
Tagged: kingston, kingston hyper x, Genesis LoVo, 16GB, ddr3-1600

If you were impressed by the low wattage required to run the AMD AM1 Athlon 5350 and are thinking of building a low power system along the lines of the one Josh used in his review Kingston has a product to help you lower that total system voltage a little more.  HyperX Genesis LoVo uses only a mere 1.35V to power the 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9 kit and their low profile helps if you are building a small sized system.  Performance at stock speeds is quite decent, with the possibility of overclocking to add more speed if you desire but these DIMMs are more about power savings than raw power.  Check out the full review at Funky Kit.

Kingston_LoVo_pht2.jpg

"Even though higher clocked RAM is great for overclocking and gaming for most computer users, memory at lower clocks is good enough for the general tasks they perform daily. For those users, memory speed is usually less important than capacity so today we wish to present something more regular in the memory's world what is Kingston HyperX Genesis LoVo 16GB DDR3-1600 CL9. As probably some readers already noticed, we can't really call it regular memory as Kingston specified it to run at low voltage of 1.35V ... and it's green like most eco-friendly products."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

Revisiting ultra fast DDR3; is it worth the price yet?

Subject: Memory | November 18, 2013 - 06:33 PM |
Tagged: DDR3-2400, patriot, Viper 3, Black Mamba, 16GB

Patriot's Viper 3 Black Mamba PC3-19200 16GB kit will set you back $225 to purchase which is a large premium over DDR3-1600.  Base timings of 11-11-11-28 are not that much higher than DDR3 which might help these DIMMs live up to their premium pricing as will Intel's XMP 1.3 memory profile.  To find out how it compares to other 2400MHz RAM as well as slower kits you can head over to Neoseeker to read their full review as well as see what kind of overclock they managed to attain.

2_.png

"Today we review Patriot's Viper 3 series Black Mamba PC3-19200 16B dual channel memory kit featuring low-profile heatspreaders and an Intel XMP profile."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Neoseeker

Just how special is Kingston's 10th Anniversary HyperX Kit

Subject: Memory | October 3, 2013 - 05:31 PM |
Tagged: kingston hyper x, kingston, HyperX Genesis 10th Anniversary Special Edition, DDR3-2400, 16GB

Kingston 10th Anniversary HyperX 16GB 2400MHz brings you a DOTA 2 tourney but does it also bring performance to your PC?  This 4x4 kit runs DDR3-2133 @ 11-13-13-30 or DDR3-2400 @ 11-14-14-30 which implies very good performance from these DIMMs at stock speeds.  Of course Overclockers Club were not satisfied with stock speeds and with a little tweaking managed to hit DDR3-2522 @ 12-13-13-33 which was enough to give them a boost in performance without causing instability.  Another feature of these DIMMs many will like is the low profile of the heatspreaders which will allow a much broader choice of CPU heatsink.

OC_9a.jpg

”During my testing I found that while the kit ran flawlessly at its rated speed of 2400MHz, they just did not offer a whole lot of headroom above that, even when pushing 1.75v+ through them. Seeing how running a 125MHz or 166MHz strap is a bit easier on the memory controller, I swapped to the 125MHz divider and started upping the frequency up a little at a time until reaching the maximum clock speed on the HyperX modules. I left the memory sub timings alone and controlled by the board, adjusted the primary timings to 12-13-13-33, adjusted the DRAM voltage to 1.70v, started up again, and finally reached 1260.2MHz or just over 2520MHz for a 120MHz gain in clock speed. That represents about a 5% gain from just testing and tweaking. What I found was that the Kingston HyperX 10th Anniversary modules performed well even with the boosted clock speed. The low profile heat sink makes sure there are no restrictions to the CPU cooling solution used.”

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Crucial's 16GB Ballistix Tactical has a nice surprise

Subject: Memory | November 30, 2012 - 02:04 PM |
Tagged: crucial, Ballistix Tactical, 16GB, ddr3-1600

It is a nice change when a company understates the performance of their product instead of barely living up to their promises.  Such is the case with the dual channel Crucal Ballistix Tactical 1600MHz kit, at least the one that Funky Kit benchmarked.  They hit 2133MHz and kept the timings at 9-9-9-24 1T, not bad for DIMMs which are billed for 8-8-8-24 1T@ 1600MHz!  Even better these DIMMs are very low profile, so even on boards with the DIMM slots clustered around the CPU socket you won't be limited in your choice of oversized CPU coolers.  The full review is available here.

FJ_crucial16gb-sticks-overview.jpg

"This has been some fun memory to play with, it's ability to hit clocks 50% higher than stock is impressive. It's ability to hit 2133MHz with 9-9-9 timings at only 1.5v is quite impressive."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Source: Funky Kit

Big memory from Mushkin ... 16 or 32GB, your choice

Subject: Memory | August 14, 2012 - 04:18 PM |
Tagged: ridgeback, redline, Mushkin, ddr3-1866, 32GB, 16GB

You can pick up two DIMMs with the 16GB kit or four with the 32GB, either way you end up with DDR3-1866MHz @ 10-10-10-27 running on 1.5v, with a lifetime warranty to boot!  When Overclockers Club went to work the two kits did end up showing some difference as the 16GB kit hit 2288MHz @ 11-11-12-28 2T while the 32GB only managed 2202MHz @ 11-12-12-28 2T.  If you check out the Mushkin Redline series on NewEgg you will see a wide variety of models, so pick the ones with the lowest latency for the best performance out of the box as well as more overclocking headroom.

OC_mush.jpg

"Looking at these two kits of memory from Mushkin shows that it has another pair of kits that deliver performance indicative of their specifications and more. First up are the distinctive good looks and functionality of the cooling solutions employed on each kit. The 32GB kit part number 994071 uses the "Ridgeback" design. This robust heatsink package uses a series of angle shaped (think Mushkin logo) fins on top of a thick body to effectively wick away the thermal load generated by these high density modules. Packing them into a four DIMM configuration like used in the testing will allow a higher heat load to be retained but is nothing to be concerned about. Using an air cooled CPU cooling solution would fix that issue as once air starts moving over the modules they cool down fast."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Author:
Subject: Memory
Manufacturer: GSkill

Memory? Why?

Aaah memory.  It has been some time since we last had a memory review, and for good reason.  Memory got pretty boring.  Ten years ago this was not the case.  DDR was just fresh on the scene and we were starting to see memory speeds and bandwidths get to a place where it would have a significant effect on performance.  Latencies were of utmost importance, and the fastest 2.2.2.6 DIMMs running at DDR 400 speeds were often quite expensive.  Then things sort of mellowed out.  DDR-2 did not exactly bring faster performance over DDR initially, and it was not until DDR-2 800 and 1066 speeds that we actually saw a significant boost over previous gen DDR 1.  DDR-3 brought even more yawns.  With the jump to integrated memory controllers from both AMD and Intel, DDR-3 speeds were nearly meaningless.

gskill_001.jpg

The primary reason for this rather vanilla time in the memory market was that of individual bandwidth needs for CPU cores.  Most research into this issue points to an individual CPU core needing only 3 to 4 GB/sec of bandwidth to support its data needs.  AMD and Intel have gone to great lengths to increase the efficiency of not only their memory controllers and prefetchers, but also the internal caches so fewer main memory accesses are needed.  So essentially a quad core processor would really only need upwards of 12 to 13 GB/sec of bandwidth in real world scenarios.  DDR-3 1333 memory modules in a dual channel configuration would be able to support that kind of bandwidth quite easily.  So what exactly was the point of having faster memory?  Also, CPUs using DDR-3 memory are not as sensitive to latencies as we have seen in previous generations of parts.

Click to read the rest of the article.