Only 1920x1080 or better need apply

Subject: Mobile | November 27, 2014 - 05:35 PM |
Tagged: 1080p, Chillblast, Prestige i5-4200SH, dell, Inspiron 17 7000, hp, Beats Special Edition, Lenovo, Yoga 2 13, toshiba, Satellite S70-B-10U

Sick of the standard laptop screen resolution of 1366x768, especially on a laptop with a 17" screen?  The Register has collected five laptops which have a 1080p resolution, several of which feature touchscreen capabilities for use with Win 8.1 and range in screen size up to 17.3". There is a variety of quality, the lower cost HP notebook does not feature an IPS display and so is not as sharp as some other models but then again it is not as expensive as the other models either.  There is not much in the way of benchmarks but it is not too hard to estimate performance based on the components which are inside these laptops as they are common among the current generation of laptops.  This review focuses on the screen, much like your eyes do.

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"For the more discerning eye, that’s just not enough, and while we’ll be looking at the more expensive HiDPI laptops soon, full HD laptops are certainly more affordable these days, especially if you’re prepared to trade having a high-performance CPU or a speedy solid-state drive for a crisper, higher resolution image instead."

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Source: The Register

Have $200, looking for 1080p

Subject: General Tech | July 16, 2014 - 07:24 PM |
Tagged: amd, nividia, budget, 1080p, r7 265, gtx 750 ti, r7 260x

[H]ard|OCP's testing was performed using an i7-3770K but for those looking at the G3258 or other lower priced processors their results will still hold true.  As of this posting all three of these cards are within $15 of the $150 mark so even including taxes and shipping you can get your hands on one for less than $200.  If you have a 1080p monitor and want the best bang for your buck, which card is the best choice?  The results were not absolutely clear cut and your experience may vary depending on the overclock you can achieve but in the end one card stood out, see which one in their full review.

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"Today we continue our quest at finding the best value for 1080p gaming at less than $200. We are looking at two video cards from ASUS, the R7 265 DirectCU II and the GTX 750 Ti DirectCU II OC. We will compare across a variety of 1080p gaming, and draw our conclusion on the best value between the R7 260X, R7 265, and GTX 750 Ti."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP
Subject: Systems
Manufacturer: Various

The Road to 1080p

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The stars of the show: a group of affordable GPU options

When preparing to build or upgrade a PC on any kind of a budget, how can you make sure you're extracting the highest performance per dollar from the parts you choose? Even if you do your homework comparing every combination of components is impossible. As system builders we always end up having to look at various benchmarks here and there and then ultimately make assumptions. It's the nature of choosing products within an industry that's completely congested at every price point.

Another problem is that lower-priced graphics cards are usually benchmarked on high-end test platforms with Core i7 processors - which is actually a necessary thing when you need to eliminate CPU bottlenecks from the mix when testing GPUs. So it seems like it might be valuable (and might help narrow buying choices down) if we could take a closer look at gaming performance from complete systems built with only budget parts, and see what these different combinations are capable of.

With this in mind I set out to see just how much it might take to reach acceptable gaming performance at 1080p (acceptable being 30 FPS+). I wanted to see where the real-world gaming bottlenecks might occur, and get a feel for the relationship between CPU and GPU performance. After all, if there was no difference in gaming performance between, say, a $40 and an $80 processor, why spend twice as much money? The same goes for graphics. We’re looking for “good enough” here, not “future-proof”.

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The components in all their shiny boxy-ness (not everything made the final cut)

If money was no object we’d all have the most amazing high-end parts, and play every game at ultra settings with hundreds of frames per second (well, except at 4K). Of course most of us have limits, but the time and skill required to assemble a system with as little cash as possible can result in something that's actually a lot more rewarding (and impressive) than just throwing a bunch of money at top-shelf components.

The theme of this article is good enough, as in, don't spend more than you have to. I don't want this to sound like a bad thing. And if along the way you discover a bargain, or a part that overperforms for the price, even better!

Yet Another AM1 Story?

We’ve been talking about the AMD AM1 platform since its introduction, and it makes a compelling case for a low cost gaming PC. With the “high-end” CPU in the lineup (the Athlon 5350) just $60 and motherboards in the $35 range, it makes sense to start here. (I actually began this project with the Sempron 3820 as well, but it just wasn’t enough for 1080p gaming by a long shot so the test results were quickly discarded.) But while the 5350 is an APU, I didn't end up testing it without a dedicated GPU. (Ok, I eventually did but it just can't handle 1080p.)

But this isn’t just a story about AM1 after all. Jumping right in here, let's look at the result of my research (and mounting credit card debt). All prices were accurate as I wrote this, but are naturally prone to fluctuate:

Tested Hardware
Graphics Cards

MSI AMD Radeon R7 250 2GB OC - $79.99

XFX AMD Radeon R7 260X - $109.99

EVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 - $109.99

EVGA NVIDIA GeForce GTX 750 Ti SC - $153.99

Processors

AMD Athlon 5350 2.05 GHz Quad-Core APU - $59.99

AMD Athlon X2 340X 3.2 GHz Dual-Core CPU - $44.99.

AMD Athlon X4 760K 3.8 GHz Quad-Core CPU - $84.99

Intel Pentium G3220 3.0 GHz Dual-Core CPU - $56.99

Motherboards

ASRock AM1B-ITX Mini-ITX AMD AM1 - $39.99

MSI A88XM-E45 Micro-ATX AMD A88X - $72.99

ECS H81H3-M4 Micro-ATX Intel H81 - $47.99

Memory 4GB Samsung OEM PC3-12800 DDR3-1600 (~$40 Value)
Storage Western Digital Blue 1TB Hard Drive - $59.99
Power Supply EVGA 430 Watt 80 PLUS PSU - $39.99
OS Windows 8.1 64-bit - $99

So there it is. I'm sure it won't please everyone, but there is enough variety in this list to support no less than 16 different combinations, and you'd better believe I ran each test on every one of those 16 system builds!

Keep reading our look at budget gaming builds for 1080p!!

MSI provides mobile gaming power for those who can't make do with a tablet

Subject: Mobile | January 18, 2013 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: msi, GT70 Limited Dragon Edition, 17.3, 1080p, 3630QM

Gaming laptops are attractive to some users, who are willing to pay the premium to have a system which can play the latest games and is still somewhat portable.  MSI has been providing these users with solid products over the years and has recently updated their product line with the GT70 Limited Dragon Edition.  One of the best features of this laptop is the screen, proper 1920 x 1080 screens are all too rare on laptops.  Inside you will find an octo-core Core i7 3630QM, a GTX 675, 8GB DDR3 and even a KillerNIC, enough to get you playing Far Cry 3 in style.  The backlit keyboard features a GPU Turbo boost key and a Cooler boost key which should probably both be used at the same time.  In fact the only things that MadShrimps would have like to see changed is a different type of SSD and an IPS display instead of the TN that MSI used.

MSI GT70 Dragon edition gaming laptops.jpg

"In recent 2 years, MSI did not focus on the Ultrabook series as many other brands, they mainly focused on high performance of Gaming series Notebooks, that makes MSI to become a well known gaming products company in the market, also shows how important of the Gaming related market."

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Source: MadShrimps

Samsung's off kilter 27" LED LCD

Subject: Displays | November 29, 2012 - 01:56 PM |
Tagged: T27B750, Samsung, led lcd, 27, 1080p

The look of the Samsung T27B750 is certainly unique, though the size and shape of the footprint may turn out to be inconvenient for some desks.  On the other hand it does more than you would expect from your monitor, it has integrated WiFi, internet apps, a built-in browser as well as speakers and it even comes with a remote control.  The connectivity is a little questionable as well, there are HDMI, DisplayPort and DSub but it lacks a DVI input which seems odd, though it can be worked around.  It is too bad that the display is only 1080p and Tweaknews would have preferred that it be a 120Hz display to support 3D, however it does make a decent jack of all trades.

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"With the line between monitors and fully functional TVs becoming blurred with every model release and the ever expanding size of mainstream monitors for home consumers, your average household is rapidly turning to an all in one solution to save space and increase the overall value of their single purchase."

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Source: Tweaknews

Asus VG278HE Is 27" 1080p, 144 Hz Gaming Monitor

Subject: Displays | July 26, 2012 - 11:17 PM |
Tagged: tn monitor, nvidia, monitor, asus, 3d vision 2, 144hz, 1080p

ASUS has a new 27” desktop monitor that should be hitting shelves soon. The VG278HE is an LED-backlit TN display with 1920x1080p resolution. So far, the specs are fairly lackluster, especially considering it is a 27” monitor. What is impressive about the display is the refresh rate. At 144 Hz, it offers up some promising 3D benefits, and as such it is compatible with NVIDIA’s 3D Vision 2 technology (the necessary glasses and transmitter are sold separately).

For 3D, the 144 Hz refresh rate means that you can get 72 Hz per eye, which should make it a much smoother experience that cuts down on flicker. It also suggests benefits for 2D gamers as well, because you can enable V-Sync to reducing tearing and still get respectable frame rates. Sure, 240 hertz would be really nice, but at least this is a step in the right direction for desktop monitors that seem to be perpetually stuck at 1080p resolutions (unless you go Korean, of course – as Josh would put it). The TN panel and resolution are drawbacks, but depending on price this may still be a good buy. Unfortunately, there is no word yet on pricing or availability according to Flat Panels HD.

Asus 144hz gaming monitor.jpg

Other features of the monitor include a swivel, tilt, and height-adjustable stand, and HDMI, DVI, and VGA video inputs. Further, the monitor offers up two three watt speakers – and better yet – a headphone jack to connect powered speakers or headphones to. (At least that’s the reported spec, I hope that it’s not simply an input like my ASUS monitor has).

Personally, I think that I would rather have a higher resolution monitor than one with a faster refresh rate, but it seems to be a highly debated topic. I’m interesting in what you think. Which do you prefer, resolution or refresh rate (3D aside)?

Granted, as Ken reported earlier this month, if you are lucky you may be able to get the best of both worlds and snag an overclockable IPS monitor – but you’ll pay for the privilege.

A passive 60Hz 3D monitor from AOC

Subject: Displays | June 19, 2012 - 04:19 PM |
Tagged: 3d vision, AOC, d2357Ph, passive 3d, 1080p, led backlight

The AOC d2357Ph has a nice array of inputs, D-Sub, DVI-D/HDMI, Composite, Component S-Video and Display Port are all present which will allow you to use this on almost any system.  On the other hand as it is a passive 3D monitor and not a 120Hz display, which R&B Mods refers to as 'poor man's 3D' and while it does offer 3D it is not as impressive as active solutions.  2D picture quality was quite good, with a minimum of backbleed and the screen is physically quite thin which could be an advantage for some users. Check out the full review for more information.

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"3D is the latest trend and today we are looking at a 3D screen from AOC; who is also one of our new sponsors. AOC’s d2357Ph is an incredibly thin monitor with LED backlighting, a Full HD resolution and the ability to display passive 3D images. What kind of 3D quality can we expect from it? Stay tuned and we will figure it out."

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HP's 2311xi, a cheap IPS monitor currently on sale for a low price

Subject: Displays | May 30, 2012 - 03:05 PM |
Tagged: led backlight, ips display, HP 2311xi, 1080p

HP's 2311xi e-IPS monitor is LED-backlit and has a native resolution of 1920x1080, giving you much better viewing angles than more commonly found TN displays, though it does sacrifice refresh rate making this display less attractive to gamers.  Overall it seems somehow behind the times, while it has HDMI, DVI and VGA inputs HP left out DisplayPort which is becoming more commonly used on both graphics cards and prebuilt machines.  TechReviewSource also describes it as having limited adjustment capabilities which is likely to frustrate professional users.  Overall it seems that HP could have done a better job on this $200+ monitor, though HP is currently selling it with an $80 rebate making it a bit more attractive.

HP2311xi.jpg

"The HP 2311xi isn't your typical 23-inch LED monitor. It has an extremely wide viewing angle, a beautiful IPS display and lots of connections that include HDMI. It is a full 1080p HD display that provides a very good looking image but it lacks ergonomic adjustments."

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AOC Will Show Off USB Powered 22 Inch LED Monitor At CES

Subject: Displays | January 5, 2012 - 10:49 AM |
Tagged: monitor, led, display, CES, AOC, 1080p

CES, the Consumer Electronics Show, is not until next week, but the tsunami of information and products that is sure to ensue has already started to rise in the form of leaks and teaser announcements. First off today is an announcement by AOC on a product that they will be showing off at CES. According to Maximum PC, the monitor, dubbed the e2251Fwu, will be pretty impressive by USB monitor standards.

AOC.jpg

Specifically, the monitor will be a 22 inch, LED back-lit monitor powered and connected to the PC for video via USB. It is HDCP compatible, sports a 1920x1080 resolution, 5ms response time, and 250 cd/m2 (candela per square metre) brightness, The monitor claims a 20,000,000:1 dynamic contrast ratio, though comparing contrast ratios isn't very reliable (but that's another story).  Unfortuantely, I wasn't able to dig up much more information from around the web.  It will be interesting to see just how much latency the USB connection will add and whether it will be close to the panel's 5ms response time.

Further, the monitor is slated to be available in February for just under 200 bucks. For those of you that have tried out USB connected displays, how well do they work as secondary monitors?

PC Perspective's CES 2012 coverage is sponsored by MSI Computer

Source: Maximum PC

HD Projectors are fun, 3D HD projectors more so

Subject: Displays | December 7, 2011 - 02:40 PM |
Tagged: 3d display, projector, 1080p, optima, optima hd33

In the interests of dispensing with the bad news first, buying an Optima HD33 3D projector will set you back $1500 and does not come with glasses.  On the other hand, thanks to the Texas Instruments 1080p DLP chipset you get full HD resolution image of up to 300" (aka 25') at 1800 ANSI Lumens.  It is active 3D so the projector ships with an RF emitter for the necessary 3D glasses, which are battery powered.  Techware Labs found that the batteries would last about 2 hours before they started to show problems, at that point requiring a 30 minute recharge time over a USB cable.  It supports all HDMI 1.4a mandatory 3D formats, so you have your choice of 3D glasses to purchase which is good as the projector does not ship with 3D glasses in the box.  Optoma sells the BG-ZD101 DLP Link 3D Glasses separately for about $75 each.

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Didn't I see this in a recent game sequel?

"Optoma's HD33 projector which is a full 3D 1080P projector gets reviewed by TechwareLabs. Through a full 90 day review we were very impressed with the Optoma HD33 projector and were very reluctant to ship it back. The Optoma is a very well designed, very bright and sharp projection. The very simple option and use made the setup and usage ever so simple. All you need is a wall big enough to project on and 3D content."

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