Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: PC Perspective

Introduction, Specifications and Packaging

Introduction:

Back in November of last year, we tested the Corsair Neutron XT, which was the first product to feature the Phison PS3110-S10 controller. First spotted at Flash Memory Summit, the S10 sports the following features:

  • Quad-core controller - Quad-core CPU dedicates three cores just to managing flash and maintaining performance
  • Maximum throughput and I/O - Offers speeds of up to 560 MB/s read and 540 MB/s write and 100K IOPs on read and 90 IOPs on write, saturating the SATA 6Gbps bus
  • End-to-end Data Path Protection - Enterprise level CRC/ECC corrects internal soft errors as well as detecting and correcting any errors that may arise between the DRAM, controller, and flash
  • SmartECC™ - Reconstructs defective/faulty pages when regular ECC fails
  • SmartRefresh™ - Monitors block ECC health status and refreshes blocks periodically to improve data retention
  • SmartFlush™ - Minimizes time data spends in cache to ensure data retention in the event of power loss
  • Advanced wear-leveling and garbage collection

Corsair was Phison's launch partner, but as that was a while ago, we now have two additional SSD models launching with the S10 at their core:

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To the left is the Kingston HyperX Savage. To the right is the Patriot Ignite. They differ in flash memory types used, available capacities, and the stated performance specs vary slightly among them. Today we'll compare them against the Neutron XT as well as a selecton of other SATA SSDs.

Read on for the full review!

Just what kind of lining can you expect on the Kingston HyperX Cloud II headset?

Subject: General Tech | February 16, 2015 - 06:29 PM |
Tagged: kingston, HyperX Cloud II, audio, gaming headset, dsp

As regular subscribers of the PC Perspective Podcast are aware, not every headset is created equally and while poor to moderate sound reproduction on the speakers can be ignored to a certain degree, poor sound capture quality on the microphone cannot.  Kingston's original HyperX Cloud was not too bad for sound capture and most of the ears which were attached to people that reviewed the headset found it quite enjoyable.  Techgage tried out Kingston's follow up product the stereo Cloud II with inline DSP to allow virtual 7.1 surround sound recently, focusing more on the audio reproduction than capture.  From their review it does indeed sound like Kingston has put out another audio winner but as they did not do much testing of the audio capture quality we are not sure if this product might make it onto a podcast near you.

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"Sequels… they’re either blockbusters (The Empire Strikes Back) better than the original or busts (Caddyshack II) that should have never seen the light of day. In the world of PC peripherals, it’s rare when we see a direct follow-up to a product. Kingston, though, bucks the trend with its new HyperX Cloud II gaming headset. Is it a blockbuster, or a bust?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: Techgage

Overclocker Cranks DDR4 Memory to a World Record Setting 4,351 MHz

Subject: Memory | February 6, 2015 - 08:40 PM |
Tagged: overclocking, kingston hyper x, kingston, ddr4, ces 20156, CES

Overclocker "Toppc" from MSI was able to crank a single stick of DDR4 memory to a world record 4,351 MHz at the International CES 2015 competition. Toppc paired the Kingston Predator DDR4 DIMM with an Intel Haswell-E Core i7-5960X processor and a MSI X99S Xpower AC motherboard. After disabling all but one CPU core and adding in copious amounts of liquid nitrogen, the 4GB memory module was overclocked to 4,351 MHz which was measured using CPU-Z (CPU-Z Validation) and verified with an oscilloscope (shown in the embedded video below).

This overclock is quite impressive even if it is not something you can run at home especially for DDR4 which is designed to use less power than DDR3. Out of the box the DIMMs are rated at up to 3,333 MHz which means they achieved an impressive 30.54% overclock (an increase of 1,018 MHz).

This kind of overclock will only result in marginal performance gains (at best) in everyday applications, but is still cool to see. Also, it surely won't hurt benchmark runs!

 

Kingston's new HyperX member, the Cloud II Pro gaming headset

Subject: General Tech | January 28, 2015 - 05:14 PM |
Tagged: audio, kingston, hyperx cloud II pro, gaming headset

Kingston's HyperX Cloud II Pro Gaming Headset can work as just a normal over the ear headset thanks to the removable microphone and 3.5" jack but provides more functionality when you use the inline 7.1 audio DSP connected to a USB port.  The speakers are rated at a frequency response of 15Hz–25,000 Hz and the microphone at 50–18,000 Hz but be aware that the quality of your voice is significantly better when not connected via USB.  The 7.1 audio emulation software works as advertised although the reviewer at Modders Inc prefers to use stereo.  Check out the full review right here.

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"Two years ago, I walked into the Emperor's Ballroom in Caesar's Palace hotel in Las Vegas Nevada wearing khakis and a golf-shirt, feeling woefully underdressed for the venue as I did not exactly pack a ball gown nor do I look good in one. The room had high ornate coffered ceilings, triumphal arches, elaborate carpeting and real marble floors, all …"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Source: Modders Inc

CES 2015: Kingston Launches HyperX Predator PCIe SSD

Subject: Storage, Shows and Expos | January 6, 2015 - 08:08 AM |
Tagged: Marvell 88SS9293, ssd, Predator, pcie, M.2, kingston, hyperx, ces 2015, CES

This morning Kingston officially launched their HyperX Predator. This is an M.2 PCIe 2.0 x4 SSD using a Marvell 88SS9293 controller. We would normally paste their press photo here, but we were fortunate enough to get our own photo from one of the press events last night:

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I can see just how this design went down. Marketing guy tells design guy "make this look cool". Design guy epically succeeds by leaving the PCIe data lane differential pair traces unmasked. There's no doubt this is a PCIe 2.0 x4 SSD, as you can clearly pick out the four sets of traces. It's a subtle thing that makes the HHHL adapter board look just so much cooler.

The HyperX Predator will also be available in a bare M.2 2280 form factor, seen here in a new Broadwell NUC:

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The Marvell controller at use here is a native PCIe solution and should have no issue reaching 1.4 GB/sec reads and 1 GB/sec writes. Capacities will launch at 240 GB and 480GB, with a 960GB option coming mid 2015. We will publish a full performance review of this attractive new SSD just as soon as we get a sample in for testing.

Full press blast after the break.

Coverage of CES 2015 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2015 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Kingston

Another 500TB of Writes and Still Two SSDs Alive

Subject: General Tech, Storage | December 4, 2014 - 10:57 PM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung, kingston

Once again, we're talking about The Tech Report and their attempt at working SSDs to death. At the last checkpoint, 1.5 petabytes of total writes, the Samsung 840 Pro and the Kingston HyperX 3K (240GB) became the final two. Which will become the sole survivor? How long will it go before dying? Who knows. We just crossed 2 petabytes and these things simply won't die.

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Image Credit: The Tech Report

So yeah, we have hit 2 petabytes and these drives seem to be chugging along. Neither of the two survivors have even displayed any major drops in read or write performance, at least not permanently. The Samsung 840 Pro has experienced a few, temporary dips in write performance, from around 500MB/s to around 450MB/s, boo hoo, but has recovered each time.

That said, both drives are using their reserve space. The Samsung 840 Pro has used about 60 percent of its reserve in the last 1300 TB of writes, following a fairly linear decline. If it continues, this drive should finally kick the bucket just before 3 petabytes of writes (~2.87PB). The Kingston HyperX, on the other hand, who knows. That SSD seems to have had a rough time over the last 500TB, but that could be just a hiccup. It could also be on its way out, who knows?

Source: Tech Report

Can you see the difference between these DDR4-3000 DIMMs?

Subject: Memory | October 20, 2014 - 02:12 PM |
Tagged: Vengeance LPX, corsair, Ripjaws 4, G.Skill, hyperx predator, kingston, ddr4, DDR4-3000

With the new DDR4 standard comes new speeds and of course updated branding from the major memory resellers.  As it is brand new there is a possibility that some memory is better than others at this point, which is why Kitguru assembled three different kits to test.  Corsair's Vengeance LPX, G.Skill's Ripjaws 4 and Kingston's HyperX Predator all have very similar specifications on paper though each has a distinctive look.  Read on to find out if there is a brand that you should be looking for right now, or if it is price and availability which should drive your purchasing decision.

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"One of the key technological advancements that the Haswell-E processors and Intel’s latest High-End Desktop (HEDT) platform iteration have brought into the consumer limelight is DDR4. We compare three 16GB quad-channel memory kits from Corsair, G.Skill, and Kingston, all running at 3000MHz. Is there a specific set of ‘go-to’ memory at this early point in the DDR4 life-cycle?"

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

 

Source: KitGuru

Tech Report's SSD Endurance Test Is Down to Two

Subject: General Tech, Storage | September 21, 2014 - 08:41 PM |
Tagged: ssd, Samsung, kingston hyper x, kingston, endurance, corsair neutron gtx, corsair, 840 pro

Many drives have died over the last year and a bit. The Tech Report has been torturing SSDs with writes until they drop. Before a full petabyte of data was written, three of the six drives kicked the bucket. They are now at 1500TB of total writes and one of the three survivors, the 240GB Corsair Neutron GTX, dropped out. This was a bit surprising as it was reporting fairly high health when it entered "the petabyte club" aside from a dip in read speeds.

The two remaining drives are the Samsung 840 Pro (256GB) and Kingston HyperX 3K (240GB).

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Two stand, one fell (Image Credit: Tech Report)

Between those two, the Samsung 840 Pro is given the nod as the Kingston drive lived through uncorrectable errors; meanwhile, the Samsung has yet to report any true errors (only reallocations). Since the test considers a failure to be a whole drive failure, though, the lashings will persist until the final drive gives out (or until Scott Wasson gives up in a glorious sledgehammer apocalypse -- could you imagine if one of them lasted a decade? :3).

Of course, with just one unit from each model, it is difficult to faithfully compare brands with this marathon. While each lasted a ridiculously long time, the worst of the bunch putting up with a whole 2800 full-drive writes, it would not be fair to determine an average lifespan for a given model with one data point each. It is good to suggest that your SSD probably did not die from a defrag run -- but it is still a complete waste of your time and you should never do it.

Source: Tech Report

Huzzah! RAM reviews are much more interesting now

Subject: Memory | September 15, 2014 - 05:17 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyperx predator, DDR4-3000, ddr4

Ah DDR3, it has been a long and fruitful partnership and it is good to know you won't be going anywhere soon but you now have a younger sibling that is attracting a lot of attention.  DDR4 has arrived, with a base clock of 2133MHz and many kits with higher frequencies also appearing for sale.  The ~$350, 16GB Kingston HyperX Predator kit which Legit Reviews just reviewed comes with two XPM profiles, one @ 3000MHz with timings of 15-16-16-39 and one @ 2666MHz at 14-14-14-36 and they also tested the kit @ 2133MHz with the previous timings.  As you read through the review you will notice that the synthetic benchmarks show much more drastic differences than do the gameplay tests, similar to what was seen with DDR3.  As with the previous generation it looks as though tighter timings trump frequency in the majority of cases.

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"Now that the Intel X99 chipset has been released along with the Intel Haswell-E processor series we have entered the era of DDR4 memory. There are many DDR4 memory kits on the market and right now you can find 16GB to 64GB kits of DDR4 memory ranging in speeds of 2133MHz to 3333MHz. The sheer number of kits on the market for the platform launch is rather impressive and luckily there are a good number of Intel X99 based motherboards that are ready to support DDR4 memory frequencies well beyond the JEDEC standard clock frequency of 2133MHz."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Kingston's new HyperX Fury SSD; fool me once ...

Subject: Storage | August 27, 2014 - 04:09 PM |
Tagged: Sandforce SF2281, kingston, hyper x fury, 240gb

The Kingston Hyper X Fury 240GB is a slim SSD able to fit in the anemic ultrabooks though it does ship with a 2.5mm adapter for systems which are a little more meaty.  It uses the familiar Sandforce SF2281 controller and has changed to 128GBit ONFi 3 NAND from the previous ONFi 1 and 2 found in the V300 and the first Fury models.  This NAND is slower at reads but at the same time it is also significantly more rugged, with a endurance rating of 641TB worth of writes.  Hopefully Kingston learned from the reaction to its previous release of the V300 where review models were sent out with Toggle Mode NAND which was then switched for ONFi in the retail models.  Hardware Canucks saw decent performance at a price in line with the market, but it is up to you to decide if you are willing to forgive Kingston and purchase this new SSD.

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"Kingston has long been known as a company that caters to budget-minded buyers and that's exactly what their new HyperX Fury SSD does. However, this time performance is also a priority."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage