Author:
Subject: Mobile
Manufacturer: Lenovo
Tagged: X1, Thinkpad, Lenovo, Intel

Introduction and Design

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Achieving smaller, thinner profiles is a long-standing goal of laptop manufacturers, but there’s been a particular obsession with ultra-thin laptops ever since Apple introduced the MacBook Air by taking it out of a manila envelope. Since then, tablets and smartphones have only increased the appeal of thin laptops. Consumers are becoming used to the idea of their electronics tightening their waistlines, and there’s no sign that this trend will stop.

The manufacturer response to this demand has been a lackluster. Laptops like the Dell Adamo came and went, but didn’t seem to put much dent in the market. That wasn’t terribly surprising, because making a laptop thin is expensive, and the Windows laptop brands generally struggle to bring in customers for products priced over $1000. 

One of the most successful responses to the Air was arguably Lenovo’s ThinkPad X series. The X series had always been thin-and-light, but was never targeted towards the average consumer. Still, these laptops – particularly the X301, which had a display size similar to the MacBook Air – seemed reasonable competition. Then Lenovo pulled the plug on the X301, leaving a 13 inch thin-and-light shaped hole in the roster. Today’s we’re looking at the plug for that hole.

Continue on and read our full review of the Lenovo X1 notebook...

Lenovo's thinest ThinkPad yet, the X1

Subject: Mobile | May 24, 2011 - 12:21 PM |
Tagged: Lenovo, Thinkpad, X1

There is a lot to love about the ThinkPad X1, inside a Core i5-2520M @ 2.5 GHz (with Intel HD 3000 graphics of course) 4GB of DDR3 and a 7200RPM 320GB HDD powers a 13.4" 1366 x 768 LCD which is covered with Corning Gorilla glass. All that in a package weighing 3.73lbs and with dimensions of 13.26" x 9.1" x 0.84".  Even the back plate is interesting, with a USB 3.0 port, HDMI port, Mini DisplayPort port and a powered eSATA/USB 2.0 combo port, in addition to the card reader and USB 2.0 ports.  Unless you are married to the IPS LCD on the X220 TechSpot highly recommends this laptop.

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“A couple of months ago we were checking out Lenovo’s then latest ThinkPad offering, the X220. Based on Intel’s second generation Core processors, this system was classic business-oriented ThinkPad throughout. A few months before the X220, I had the IdeaPad U260 in-house which was classified by Lenovo as a “thin, light, stylish travel companion”.

I mention those two units as a transition to what we have for review today, the new ThinkPad X1. As the thinnest ThinkPad ever, the X1 seemingly takes the best features from the X220 and the U260 and merges them into one. The result is an extremely thin and sleek 13.4” notebook that is a real follow-up model to the X300 series that many came to own and love a couple of years ago.”

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Source: TechSpot

Lenovo ThinkPad X1 ultra-portable laptop

Subject: Mobile | April 27, 2011 - 05:40 PM |
Tagged: ultra-portable, Thinkpad, Lenovo

Lenovo has added a laptop to their ultra-portable notebook lineup.  The ThinkPad X1 features a Core i5 2520M CPU, 8GB of RAM, 160GB SSD and a 13.3-inch screen made from Gorilla Glass with a 1366x768 resolution. All of those features in a small 0.84-inch-thick package. The ThinkPad X1 also included a good keyboard and the great build quality we come to expect from the ThinkPad brand.

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The bad news is the ThinkPad X1’s battery is sealed, meaning you will not be able to remove it yourself but the good news is the battery comes with a 3 year warranty and has a few replacement options. The battery can be replaced at a repair depot or Lenovo will have an on-site technician can come to replace the battery as early as the next business day. Lenovo clams the ThinkPad X1’s RapidCharge battery will last three times as long and will charge to 80% within 30 minutes.

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With all of features the ThinkPad X1 has. Is it worth the $2900 price tag? You can buy a 13-inch MacBook Air for $1299 but, it’s unfair to judge the two of them by price alone because of the differences in processor, memory and hard drive size. Is a faster processor, more memory, larger SSD and a better battery warranty worth the extra cost?

Source: zdnet