CES 2016: Linksys EA9500 MAX-STREAM AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router

Subject: Networking | January 5, 2016 - 10:40 AM |
Tagged: tri-band, mu-mimo, linksys, EA9500, CES 2016, CES, AC5400, 802.11ac Wave 2

Linksys has announced their new flagship 4x4 MU-MIMO wireless router, and the EA9500 offers tri-band Wi-Fi with dual 5 GHz (simultanious) plus 2.4 GHz bands, 8 Gigabit Ethernet ports, and 8x adjustable antennas.

linksys-li-EA9500-1.jpg

"Designed as a dual-purpose home office and entertainment Wi-Fi router, the MAX-STREAM AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router (EA9500) delivers Wi-Fi to multiple users on multiple devices at the same time and same speed. Now you can experience lag-free videoconferencing or file transfers in your home office upstairs while the rest of the family is streaming 4K or HD media, surfing the web, and playing online games simultaneously.

Efficient MU-MIMO (Multi-User, Multiple-Input, Multiple-Output) technology treats each of your devices as if each has its own dedicated router, ensuring everyone can enjoy Wi-Fi without interruption or buffering. The router is simple to set up so you can bring your workspace online in three easy steps."

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  • Key Features:
    • Tri-Band (5 GHz + 5GHz + 2.4 GHz) 
    • 4x4 AC, MU-MIMO
    • Advanced Security
    • USB 3.0 Port
    • Dual-Core CPU
    • Beamforming Technology
    • 8 Adjustable Antennas
    • Smart Wi-Fi
  • Specifications:
    • Wi-Fi Technology: AC5400 MU-MIMO Tri-band Gigabit, 1000+2165+2165 Mbps 
    • Network Standards: 802.11b, 802.11a/g, 802.11n, 802.11ac
    • Wi-Fi Speed: AC5400 (N1000 + AC2615 + AC2615)
    • Wi-Fi Bands: 2.4 and 5 GHz (2x) (simultaneous tri-band)
    • Wi-Fi Range: Very Large Household
    • Ports: 1x Gigabit WAN, 8x Gigabit LAN, 1x USB 3.0, 1x USB 2.0
    • Antennas: 8x external adjustable antennas
    • Processor: 1.4 GHz dual-core
    • Wireless Encryption: 64/128-bit WEP, WPA2 Personal, WPA2 Enterprise
    • Security Features: WPA/WPA2, 128 bit AES link encryption, FCC class B
    • Operation Modes: Wireless Router, Access Point, Wired Bridge, Wireless Bridge
    • Storage File System Support: FAT, NTFS, HSF+
    • Dimensions (LxWxH): 10.41 x 12.53 x 2.62 inches (without antennas)
    • Weight: 3.8 lbs

The EA9500 MAX-STREAM AC5400 Tri-Band Wi-Fi Router will carry a $399.99 MSRP, with availability planned for April 2016.

Coverage of CES 2016 is brought to you by Logitech!

PC Perspective's CES 2016 coverage is sponsored by Logitech.

Follow all of our coverage of the show at http://pcper.com/ces!

Source: Linksys

PCPer Live! Killer Networks Live Stream and Giveaway!

Subject: Networking | December 7, 2015 - 10:06 PM |
Tagged: video, rivet network, rivet, live, Killer Networking, killer network, giveaway, contest

UPDATE: Did you miss the live stream on Monday? No worries, you can catch up on the information and demos from Rivet Networks CEO Michael Cubbage here in the video below!

We are just a few weeks away from Christmas and we are burning through the content here at PC Perspective, preparing everyone for the new year and the upcoming CES in January. Our friends at Rivet Networks are stopping by the offices next week to co-host a live stream to discuss their latest networking technologies including Gigabit Ethernet and wireless solutions. Sebastian recently reviewed the Killer Wireless-AC 1535 with MU-MIMO support and came away very impressed! Rivet will be here to answer questions from readers and viewers, demonstrate the advantages of Killer Networking and hand out one of the best prizes we've ever offered on PC Perspective.

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And what's a live stream without prizes? Rivet Networks and Alienware have stepped up to the plate to offer up a complete gaming notebook for those of you that tune in to watch the live stream! 

  • Alienware 13 R2 - Dell.com
  • Intel Core i5-6200U
  • 13-in 1366x768 Screen
  • GeForce GTX 960M
  • 4GB Dual Channel DDR3L
  • 500GB Hybrid Hard Drive
  • Killer 1535 802.11ac 2x2 Wi-Fi
  • Killer E4200 Gigabit Ethernet

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Killer Networks Live Stream and Giveaway

1pm PT / 4pm ET - December 7th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Monday, December 7th at 1pm PT / 4pm ET at http://www.pcper.com/live. There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience. To win the notebook you will have to be watching the live stream, with exact details of the methodology for handing out the goods coming at the time of the event.

I will be joined by Mike Cubbage, CEO of Rivet Networks and no topics will be taken off the table. Clearly if you have questions, concerns or ideas about Killer Networking or networks in general, this is the stream to participate in!

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If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from Rivet / Killer Networking?

So join us! Set your calendar for Monday at 1pm PT / 4pm ET and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Source: PCPer Live!

Asus' Upcoming RT-AC5300 Router Is A Massive Tri-Band Router

Subject: Networking | November 17, 2015 - 12:56 PM |
Tagged: nitroQAM, mu-mimo, gigabit router, broadcom, asuswrt, asus, 802.11ac

Asus has officially launched the RT-AC5300, a massive replicator tri-band wireless router. The new router is fenced in by eight large antennas that allow the device to support 4 x 4 MU-MIMO wireless on two 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz bands.

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The menacing high-end wireless router supports the latest wired and wireless consumer networking technologies and runs the AsusWRT firmware. The RT-AC5300 is clad in black with red accents. The top of the router is mesh to facilitate cooling. In addition to the eight antennas, there are five gigabit Ethernet ports (up to two ports can be configured as WAN ports), a USB 3.0 port, one USB 2.0 port, and physical buttons for WPS, Wi-Fi, and LED on/off.

Powered by a Broadcom chipset, the router supports 802.11ac as well as older N/G/B Wi-Fi standards. Using NitroQAM technology, the two 5 GHz bands each support up to 2,167 Mbps speeds while the 2.4 GHz band tops out at 1,000 Mbps. This is a boost over the usual 1,734 Mbps for 5 GHz and 600 Mbps for 2.4 GHz wireless bandwidth numbers. Asus claims that the router can run all three bands simultaneously along with beamforming to improve the signal to devices by focusing the signal. Note that the combined advertised "5334 Mbps" of the router includes all three bands but a single device would max out at the 2,167 Mbps theoretical maximum of a single band. The router is capable of automatically figuring out and using the optimal band to communicate with each device based on its capabilities and signal strength.

When it comes to wired connections, the router has four 1 Gbps LAN ports. It also supports 802.3ad link aggregation which allows using two of the gigabit ports to create a single 2 Gbps link to supported devices like network attached storage (NAS) and workstations.

Asus is using ASUSWRT firmware along with AiRadar beamforming, AiProtect security, and a subscription to WTFast GPN which is a service aimed at gamers that reportedly delivers decreased pings and lower latency connections to game servers.

Pricing and availability have not been announced, but CNET is reporting an expected price of $400 USD.

To say that this router is overkill for most is an understatement, but it is packed with features and is ready to stream a Stargate SG-1 marathon to all your devices!

Source: Asus

Synology Introduces New RT1900ac Wireless Router

Subject: Networking | November 14, 2015 - 01:07 AM |
Tagged: synology, 802.11ac, 256-QAM, mu-mimo, 3x3, gigabit router, wireless router

Synology, a company best known for its home and small office network attached storage (NAS) devices, is branching out with its first wireless router. The Synology Router RT1900ac is a high end 802.11ac Wi-Fi enabled router that is paired with some rather slick looking and useful software.

The RT1900ac supports the latest consumer grade networking tech including 802.11ac MU-MIMO (beam forming to up to six devices), 802.11n 256-QAM, and wired Gigabit Ethernet. The 5GHz band tops out at 1300 Mbps while the 2.4GHz “N” band tops out at 600 Mbps though note that a single device cannot use the combined “1900” Mbps bandwidth and even then inter-device links are limited to gigabit speeds or less.

Synology Router RT1900ac Wireless Router.jpg

The rear of the router hosts five Gigabit Ethernet ports (1 WAN, 4 LAN) and three physical antennas which means a max of 3x3 MIMO to wireless devices. The left side of the router hosts a WPS (wireless protected setup) button and a physical Wi-Fi on/off switch while the right side of the router features a single USB 3.0 port and a SD card reader. 

Internally, the router is powered by a dual core processor running at 1 GHz paired with 256 MB of DDR3 memory. Synology rates the router at a maximum of 70 connected devices with as many as 40 concurrently transmitting data.

The operating system is called the Synology Router Manager and it can be accessed via a web interface or a mobile app called DS Router for Android and iOS.

Users are able to access the router using a GUI interface that is reminiscent of other Synology software. It supports parental controls (website blocking, scheduling, ect), application layer quality of service (QoS) on a per-device level, traffic management and bandwidth monitoring (per device as well as total bandwidth used). Users are able to initially setup the router using a web interface or the mobile app to guide them through setup.

The USB port (and SDXC card slot) can be used to share files and stream media to other devices. They can also be used to share a printer over the network or enable a mobile hotspot using a cellular modem dongle.

Interestingly, users can add additional software to their router from Synology. Optional applications from Synology’s Package Center allow using the router as a VPN, torrent box, RADIUS authentication server, DNS server, file share, and media server. Being able to extend the functionality of the router is nice to see and should be popular with enthusiasts though it does raise some security concerns.

This new router will be on display at CES 2016 and will be available in the US early next year for $150.

I’m interested to see the reviews on this as it certainly looks nice and the software looks much better than most!

Source: Synology

ASUS RT-AC88U MU-MIMO Router with 8-Port Switch

Subject: Networking | October 9, 2015 - 06:00 PM |
Tagged: wireless router, RT-AC88U, router, mu-mimo, asus, 802.11ac, 8-port switch

ASUS has announced an impressive new MU-MIMO wireless router that provides up to 3100 Mbps of Wi-Fi bandwidth, and the RT-AC88U also features an 8-port Gigabit Ethernet switch.

RT-AC88U.png
 

Specifications:

  • WLAN: 802.11a/b/g/n/ac with MU-MIMO
  • Data rate: 3100 Mbps
  • Chipset: BCM47094, BCM4366, BCM4366
  • Flash: NAND 128 MB
  • RAM: DDR3 256/512 MB
  • WAN: GbE x 1
  • LAN: GbE x 8
  • Giga switch: 8365
  • PA: 2G:sky2623 5G:sky85405
  • LNA: 2G: BGU7224/LXS5563 5G:MAAL011078
  • Antenna: Detachable dual band x 4
  • USB: 3.0 x1, 2.0 x1
  • Applications: ASUSWRT, AiCloud, AiProtection, high-power mode, Download Master, VPN server, guest network, DLNA server, automatic IP, Static IP, PPPoE (MPPE support), PPTP, L2TP, IPv4, IPv6

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Pricing and availability are not yet known.

Source: ASUS
Subject: Networking
Manufacturer: Killer Networking

Introduction

The Killer 1535 Wi-Fi adapter was the first 2x2 MU-MIMO compatible adapter on the market when it launched earlier this year, and is only found in a few products right now. We had a chance to test it out with the recently reviewed MSI G72 Dominator Pro G-Sync laptop, using the new Linksys EA8500 MU-MIMO router. How did it perform, and just what is MU-MIMO? Read on to find out!

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Killer networks certainly haven’t skimped on the hardware with their new wireless adapter, as the Wireless-AC 1535 features two external 5 GHz signal amplifiers and is 802.11ac Wave 2 compliant with its support for MU-MIMO and Transmit Beamforming. And while the adapter itself certainly sounds impressive the real star here – besides the MU-MIMO support – is the Killer software. With these two technologies Killer has a unique product on the market, and if it works as advertised it would create an attractive alternative to the typical Wi-Fi solution.

MU-MIMO: What is it?

With an increasing number of devices using Wi-Fi in the average connected home the strain on a wireless network can often be felt. Just as one download can bring your internet connection to a crawl, one computer can hog nearly all available bandwidth from your router. MU-MIMO offers a solution to the network limitations of a typical multi-user home, and in fact the MU in MU-MIMO stands for Multi-User. The technology is part of the Wave 2 spec for 802.11ac, and it works differently than standard MIMO (multiple input, multiple output) technology.  What’s the difference?

With standard MIMO (also known as Single-User MIMO) compatible devices take advantage of multiple data streams that are propagated to provide faster data than would otherwise be available for a single device. Multiple antennas on both base station and the client device are used to create the multiple transmit/receive streams needed for the added bandwidth. The multiple antennas used in MIMO systems create multiple channels, allowing for those separate data streams, and the number of streams is equal to the number of antennas (1x1 supports one stream, 2x2 supports two streams, etc.).

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Continue reading our review of the Killer Wireless-AC 1535 adapter!!

IFA 2015: ASUS Reveals RT-AC5300U Router: 8 Antenna Beast

Subject: Networking | September 2, 2015 - 07:00 AM |
Tagged: RT-AC5300U, router, mu-mimo, IFA 2015, dual band, asus, 802.11ac

This is a seriously imposing-looking router, and the specs are just as huge.

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Here are some highlights from ASUS:

  • AC5300 speeds
  • Tri-band wireless up to 1000 Mbit/s on 2.4 GHz and up to 2167 Mbit/s on each 5 GHz band
  • Up to 5333 Mbit/s combined on the 5GHz band
  • NitroQAM technology for low-latency gaming and 4K/UHD streaming
  • Eight external antennas in a 4x4 config
  • Ultra-wide area coverage
  • Award-winning ASUS AiProtection Network Security Services

5333 Mbps on the 5 GHz band alone? So how does the RT-AC5300U router provide so much bandwidth? It’s powered by a staggering array of radios! Looking at the chipset specs we that it’s comprised of BCM4709 + BCM4366 (2.4 GHz) + 2x BCM4366 (5 GHz), with 256MB DDR3 memory and 128MB of flash. And we can’t forget the 8 external dual-band antennas! Yes, eight. Truly, this is a beast (though it looks like an overturned spider).

Pricing and exact availability were not revealed, but ASUS says it will be coming in Q4 2015.

Source: ASUS

We're Running Out of IPv4... Still...

Subject: Networking | July 5, 2015 - 07:17 PM |
Tagged: ipv6, ipv4, arin

While the IP system allows for about 4.3 billion addresses, not all of those are available to actual devices. There are some that are designed for private network use, so a router can assign them without worrying that it is blocking traffic to some external resource. Another big drain was wasted addresses, where organizations would purchase a big chunk of the public address space and use a tiny fraction of it. Beyond that, we just have a lot of devices, from cell phones, to home networks, to the servers they contact. Microsoft is trying to reach a billion devices with Windows 10, and the vast majority of them are expected to be online.

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I'm mentioning it now because the American Registry for Internet Numbers (ARIN) announced that they will be unable to fulfill some requests for IPv4 blocks. All they have left at the moment are /23 and /24 chunks, which are bundles of 512 and 256 public addresses. As of the time of publishing, 46 chunks of 512 and 431 chunks of 256 are available, which is 133,888 total public numbers.

Of course, it's not as simple as saying “let's move to IPv6 then”. There will be some pain when the switch happens. For instance, Unreal Engine 4 has only been IPv6-compliant for a year, with the launch of Unreal Engine 4.2 in June 2014. This poses a significant problem for older games that rely upon IPv4 addresses for multiplayer, and that doesn't even consider other online software.

Source: Team ARIN

Rivet Networks Announces Killer Wireless-AC 1535

Subject: Networking, Shows and Expos | June 2, 2015 - 12:00 PM |
Tagged: msi, killer nic, killer, computex 2015, computex, 802.11ac

Killer Networking has developed several networking solutions, focused on gamers, over the last decade or so. Ryan reviewed their first product way back in 2006, and he found it had some merit but struggled when quantifying it, especially to the price tag that it bore. Many years later, Qualcomm picked them up and their technology found a few design wins, especially with Gigabyte motherboards. They also branched out into wireless networking, a segment that undeniably could benefit from innovation. They are also, now, under the Rivet Networks brand, which is listed as an “Authorized Design Center” for Qualcomm.

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Today, they are announcing the Killer Wireless-AC 1535 Networking Adapter. This brings their technology to the 802.11ac standard. It includes features like DoubleShow Pro, which allows Windows to balance network traffic between wireless and wired networks. It also allows the user to monitor their wireless traffic, even providing an interface to throttle or outright disable certain applications from using the internet. They are mostly promoting their “ExtremeRange” technology, which uses the MU-MIMO standard of 802.11ac, along with beamforming and two signal amplifiers, to provide high bandwidth at longer ranges.

The Killer Wireless-AC 1535 has received a few design wins, this time with MSI. It will be available in the MSI GT72 and MSI GT80 gaming laptops, as well as the MSI X99A GODLIKE GAMING motherboard. Thankfully, they are not adopting MSI's love of uppercase letters.

Recently Picked Up: Asus RT-AC66R

Subject: Networking | April 13, 2015 - 03:52 PM |
Tagged: asus, router, 802.11ac, rt-a66r, rt-a66u

Until recently, we have been using a Linksys WRT54G. No, not the WRT54GL. We have been using the cheap, $30 v8.0 unit with 8MB of RAM. Since it has been eight years since its manufacturing date, and about the same length of time since it received a firmware upgrade, we decided to upgrade to a newer model. After searching for a while, we settled on the ASUS RT-AC66. We bought it from a retail store, because it was the same price and I could get it the same day without paying for shipping, so our model has an “R” suffix, rather than the direct-from-ASUS “U”. The units are identical besides the model name though.

asus-rt-ac66r.jpg

We are using the stock ASUS firmware.

So what has happened in the last half-dozen years? First, this device has quite a few more features than the Linksys, although not many are applicable to me personally. The most interesting to me is that ASUS offers a dynamic DNS service for their routers. It seems pretty straight-forward honestly. I was looking for a place to register, but it seems like it was just a matter of inputting the desired URL into the router, and ASUS will give it to you if it is available. I was able to use the subdomain within a few minutes too, although I did not try doing much with it.

Its 2.4 GHz range is pretty good too, much wider than the WRT54G. The 5.0 GHz makes it from the basement to the TV on the main floor. It reports less than full signal, but I have nothing to compare that with (neither a second 5.0 GHz device nor another 5.0GHz router). The antenna are detachable and higher sensitive versions are available, which is probably good for edge cases, although the default ones seem to work fine for me.

It definitely seems like a good router. I don't feel it getting in-between me and my internet connection. This is not a review though, just my impressions after using it for a bit.