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AMD High-End Polaris Expected for 2016

Subject: Graphics Cards | January 18, 2016 - 09:44 PM |
Tagged: Polaris, amd

When AMD announced their Polaris architecture at CES, it was focused on mid-range applications. Their example was an add-in board that could compete against an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 950, 1080p60 medium settings in Battlefront, but do so at 39% less wattage than this 28nm, Maxwell chip. These Polaris chips are planned for a “mid 2016” launch.

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Raja Koduri, Chief Architect for the Radeon Technologies Group, spoke with VentureBeat at the show. In his conversation, he mentioned two architectures, Polaris 10 and Polaris 11, in the context of a question about their 2016 product generation. In the “high level” space, they are seeing “the most revolutionary jump in performance so far.” This doesn't explicitly state that the high-end Polaris video card will launch in 2016. That said, when combined with the November announcement, covered by us as “AMD Plans Two GPUs in 2016,” it further supports this interpretation.

We still don't know much about what the actual performance of this high-end GPU will be, though. AMD was able to push 8 TeraFLOPs of compute throughput by creating a giant 28nm die and converting the memory subsystem to HBM, which supposedly requires less die complexity than a GDDR5 memory controller (according to a conference call last year that preceded Fury X). The two-generation jump will give them more complexity to work with, but that could be partially offset by a smaller die because of the potential differences in yields (and so forth).

Also, while the performance of the 8 TeraFLOP Fury X was roughly equivalent to NVIDIA's 5.6 TeraFLOP GeForce GTX 980 Ti, we still don't know why. AMD has redesigned a lot of their IP blocks with Polaris; you would expect that, if something unexpected was bottlenecking Fury X, the graphics manufacturer wouldn't overlook it the next chance that they are able to tweak it. This could have been graphics processing or something much more mundane. Either way, upcoming benchmarks will be interesting.

And it seems like that may be this year.

Source: VentureBeat
Author:
Manufacturer: be quiet!

Introduction and Features

Introduction

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Earlier this year we took a detailed look at the Silent Base 600 and found it to be a full-featured mid-tower enclosure that focuses on quiet, virtually silent operation, while at the same time delivering excellent cooling performance, usability and support for high-end hardware. Be Quiet! introduced the Silent Base 800 mid-tower case well over a year ago and later released the Silent Base 600 mid-tower case in 2015. The two cases are functionally very similar with only a few minor changes differentiating the two. Because the two cases are so similar, we are going to highlight the Silent Base 800’s features and specifications and then point out the main differences using the Silent Base 600 as a reference.

Be Quiet!’s Silent Base Series currently includes two cases; the Silent Base 800 and the Silent Base 600. As you might expect, the Silent Base Series is designed for very quiet operation while still offering excellent performance and cooling. Both cases are targeted towards users looking to build a quiet high-end gaming or multimedia system.

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Silent Base 800 Key Features

The Be Quiet! Silent Base 800 ATX Mid-Tower enclosure comes in four different color schemes (Black/Black, Orange/Black, Silver/Black, and Red/Black) and is available with or without a side window. The Silent Base 800 comes with three Be Quiet! Pure Wings 2 fans (two 140mm intakes and one 120mm exhaust) pre-installed along with numerous options that support additional fans or liquid cooling if desired.

“The Be Quiet! Silent Base 800 offers the perfect symbiosis of noise prevention and cooling performance, good usability, and an extensive capacity for high-end hardware.”  

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Be Quiet! Silent Base 800 Mid-Tower Case Main Features:
•    Mid-Tower ATX enclosure available in four different color schemes (with or without a side window)
•    Supports ATX, Micro-ATX and Mini-ITX motherboards
•    Innovative construction assures excellent cooling efficiency and air circulation
•    Easily removed dust filters on front and bottom panels
•    Sound dampening mats used on front panel and both side panels
•    Anti-vibration decoupling provided for fans, HDDs and power supply
•    Double-glazed side panel window provides superb soundproofing
•    Three included Pure Wings fans: (2) 140mm intakes and (1) 120mm exhaust
•    Removable top panel, with top fan mounts pre-drilled for 240mm or 280mm fans and/or liquid cooling radiators
•    Excellent cooling and low noise levels with up to six fan mounting locations
o    Front: two 140mm fans included
o    Top: Dual 120mm or 140mm
o    Rear: 120mm fan included
o    Bottom: 120mm or 140mm
•    (2) USB 3.0, (2) USB 2.0 and audio jacks on the top panel
•    Seven internal 3.5” hard drive bays
•    Four internal 2.5” SSD mounting locations
•    Three external 5.25” drive bays
•    Tool-free mounting for all 3.5”/2.5” internal drives
•    Up to 290mm (11.4”) clearance for graphic cards
•    Up to 400mm (15.7”) for long graphic cards (with HDD cage removed)
•    Up to 170mm (6.7”) of space for CPU coolers
•    3-Year manufacturer’s warranty
•    MSRP: $149.99 USD ($139.99 without side window)

Please continue reading our Be Quiet! Silent Base 800 case review!!!

Patriot's Viper V560, a lot of mouse for not much money

Subject: General Tech | January 18, 2016 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: input, patriot, viper v560, gaming mouse

Patriot's Viper V560 is a mere $50 but offers many of the same features as mice half again that price which leaves one wondering how they pulled it off.  The mouse has nine buttons, five profiles you can quickly switch between as well as swappable side grips and weights.  The Avago 9800 laser sensor can be switched between 800 to 8200 DPI, with four sensitivity presets you can customize.  It even has a tiltable wheel for those who are dexterous enough to take advantage of that feature. The software is impressive, Modders Inc liked the way that you could import and export macros via the .mf file format.  As far as negatives go, the red, green, blue, purple, and aqua LEDs associated with the various profiles could not be disabled and the mouse did not sit perfectly level on flat surfaces, perhaps in part because of the use of ceramic pads.  If those issues do not concern you, head on over for a look at the full review.

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"Patriot is a company known for its memory and mobile products, and has just recently started selling peripherals. The V560 is the first-ever mouse released under the Patriot Viper brand, and it continues the trend of excellent design set by its first-ever headset."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

 

Source: Modders Inc

Fractal Design Introduces Define Nano S Mini-ITX Enclosure

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 18, 2016 - 12:39 PM |
Tagged: small form factor, silent case, SFF, mini-itx, fractal design, enclosure, define s, define nano s, case

Fractal Design has introduced the Define Nano S enclosure; a new, mini-ITX version of their popular Define S mid-tower.

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The Fractal Design Define S was our pick for 2015 enclosure of the year (in our year-in-review podcast), and this new mini-ITX version retains the larger enclosure's design aesthetic - and its support for full-size components.

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"The Define Nano S is an ITX case that features compatibility with high end, full-size components, superior sound dampening, and an ATX-like layout."

Key features for the Define Nano S from Fractal Design:

  • A Define Series ITX case designed for silent computing with sound dampening and ModuVent™ technology
  • User-friendly construction with superior cable management and compatibility for full-size components
  • Flexible storage options with room for up to 4 drives
  • Accommodates a variety of radiator sizes and includes brackets for reservoir and pump mounting
  • Features two Dynamic Series fans — 1 GP-12 and 1 GP-14 — with an adapter included for motherboards with limited fan headers
  • Featuring an open interior allowing an unobstructed airflow path from the front of the case to the rear exhaust
  • Easy-to-clean filters on the top and bottom, spanning the PSU position, with the bottom filter ejecting from the front for easy-access.

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The Define Nano S offers a great deal of room for a mini-ITX enclosure (the Nano S is approximately 13.5 inches high, 8 inches wide, and 16.2 inches deep), with support for up to a 240/280 mm radiator on both top and front fan mounts, with 6 fan mounts overall (two of Fractal's Dynamic Series fans - 120 mm and 140 mm - are included). And an important detail; both the bottom and front fan mounts feature removable dust filters.

The enclosure offers the same "ModuVent" removable top vents, allowing more silent operation if the user doesn't need to use the upper fan mounts. There is sound dampening in place throughout, allowing for a quiet build. Storage mounts are behind the rear panel (as in the Define S) supporting two each 3.5-inch and 2.5-inch drives. GPUs up to 315 mm and CPU coolers up to 160 mm are supported along with ATX PSUs up to 160 mm deep.

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Pricing will be $64.99 for the standard version, and $69.99 for the version with a window. Availability is set for March 2016.

You can check out the full specs for this new enclosure after the break.

Make friends in six languages witih Skype

Subject: General Tech | January 18, 2016 - 12:15 PM |
Tagged: slack, skype, transation

Useful real time translation, as opposed to the entertaining kind, has been a challenge for programmers for quite some time now, even professional real time translators working for the news or governments can get tongue tied.  That is what makes Microsoft's announcement about Skype translate so impressive, it can now translate Chinese Mandarin, English, French, German, Italian, Portuguese and Spanish on the fly.  If you have friends fluent in another language it would be worth testing the translations to see what level of quality they have reached as well as the voice which they hear.  The Inquirer also mentions integration with Slack, if you know of any businesses which actually use that IM and voice client. 

Phone a friend today and see if you can get Skype to throw a syntax error.

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"Redmond's also made it possible to integrate Skype and enterprise chat tool Slack, which perhaps means it's added hipster to the dialects with which Skype is comfortable."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

G.Skill Launches 128GB DDR4 3,000 MHz Memory Kit

Subject: Memory | January 18, 2016 - 01:45 AM |
Tagged: xmp, X99, Ripjaws V, G.Skill, ddr4

G.Skill is adding a new DDR4 memory kit to its Ripjaws V series aimed at the Intel X99 platform. The new kit is comprised of eight matching 16 GB DIMMs for a total of 128 GB. Supporting Intel's XMP 2.0 standard, it comes stock clocked at 3,000 MHz with CAS latencies of 14-14-14-34.

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The DDR4 kit is rated at 1.35V and will feature red or black aluminum heat spreaders in line with the company's other products. G.Skill claims that this is the world's fastest 128 GB kit running at 1.35 volts, and looking around the Internet this appears to be true. Corsair does have a Vengeance LPX kit that matches it in clockspeeds, but it has higher timings (higher latency) than G.Skill's modules.

Eight 16GB DIMMs is a lot of memory to be sure, and it is not going to come cheap. It will surely come in handy though for high performance workstations that need all the memory they can get.

G.Skill will be releasing the new DDR4 kit towards the end of January. It has not yet revealed official pricing, but going off of pricing for it's 64GB kit and the 128GB competition, I would expect it to fall around $850 to $900 USD.

What would you do with 128GB of system memory? I know that I would make one heck of a RAM Disk out of it!

Source: G.Skill

Skylake and Later Will Be Withheld Windows 7 / 8.x Support

Subject: Processors | January 17, 2016 - 02:20 AM |
Tagged: Windows 8.1, Windows 7, windows 10, Skylake, microsoft, kaby lake, Intel, Bristol Ridge, amd

Microsoft has not been doing much to put out the fires in comment threads all over the internet. The latest flare-up involves hardware support with Windows 7 and 8.x. Currently unreleased architectures, such as Intel's Kaby Lake and AMD's Bristol Ridge, will only be supported on Windows 10. This is despite Windows 7 and Windows 8.x being supported until 2020 and 2023, respectively. Microsoft does not believe that they need to support older hardware, though.

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This brings us to Skylake. These processors are out, but Microsoft considers them “transition” parts. Microsoft provided PC World with a list of devices that will be gjven Windows 7 and Windows 8.x drivers, which enable support until July 17, 2017. Beyond that date, only a handful of “most critical” updates will be provided until the official end of life.

I am not sure what the cut-off date for unsupported Skylake processors is, though; that is, Skylake processors that do not line up with Microsoft's list could be deprecated at any time. This is especially a problem for the ones that are potentially already sold.

As I hinted earlier, this will probably reinforce the opinion that Microsoft is doing something malicious with Windows 10. As Peter Bright of Ars Technica reports, Windows 10 does not exactly have an equivalent in the server space yet, which makes you wonder what that support cycle will be like. If they can continue to patch Skylake-based servers in Windows Server builds that are derived from Windows 7 and Windows 8.x, like Windows Server 2012 R2, then why are they unwilling to port those changes to the base operating system? If they will not patch current versions of Windows Server, because the Windows 10-derived version still isn't out yet, then what will happen with server farms, like Amazon Web Services, when Xeon v5s are suddenly incompatible with most Windows-based OS images? While this will, no doubt, be taken way out of context, there is room for legitimate commentary about this whole situation.

Of course, supporting new hardware on older operating systems can be difficult, and not just for Microsoft at that. Peter Bright also noted that Intel has a similar, spotty coverage of drivers, although that mostly applies to Windows Vista, which, while still in extended support for another year, doesn't have a significant base of users who are unwilling to switch. The point remains, though, that Microsoft could be doing a favor for their hardware vendor partners.

I'm not sure whether that would be less concerning, or more.

Whatever the reason, this seems like a very silly, stupid move on Microsoft's part, given the current landscape. Windows 10 can become a great operating system, but users need to decide that for themselves. When users are pushed, and an adequate reason is not provided, they will start to assume things. Chances are, it will not be in your favor. Some may put up with it, but others might continue to hold out on older platforms, maybe even including older hardware.

Other users may be able to get away with Windows 7 VMs on a Linux host.

Source: Ars Technica

GIGABYTE launches one new X170 and four X150 motherboards

Subject: Motherboards | January 15, 2016 - 05:24 PM |
Tagged: X170-Extreme ECC, X170, X150M-PRO ECC, X150M-PLUS WS, X150-PRO ECC, X150, gigabyte, GA-X150-PLUS WS

These five motherboards will be more at home powering a server than a high end gaming machine as they fully support Intel's Xeon E3-1200 v5 and other LGA 1151 processors, all but two offer ECC memory compatibility using Intel's C236 and C232 chipset.  That doesn't mean you shouldn't consider them for your next build as they should offer rock solid stability and hey, they're camouflaged!

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Up first are the X170-EXTREME ECC and X150-PRO ECC, with the first PCIe 3.0 16x slot connected directly to the CPU socket, no detours for that data.  The boards support PCIe Gen.3 x4 NVMe M.2 natively and you can pick up a U.2 converter if that is what you need for your drives and Intel's USB 3.1 controller will give you performance on both the original flavour and Type-C USB ports.  The X170 Extreme comes with a Killer E2400 Gigabit NIC, along with all of the benefits provided by that chip.

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Up next are the X150M-PRO ECC, X150M-PLUS WS and X150-PLUS WS motherboards which are listed on Gigabyte's site.  The X150M-Pro is mATX but Gigabyte still managed two PCIe 16x slots, with one limited to 4x speeds and a pair of PCI slots along with an M.2, 6 SATA 6Gbps and a SEx connector.  The X150M Plus is very similar but sports a single PCIe 16x and a 4x no legacy connectors nor a SEx port.  Finally the full ATX GA-X150-PLUS WS which adds a pair of PCIe x1 slots in addition to two PCIe 16x slots, with one limited to 4x speeds and a pair of PCI slots.

Source: Gigabyte

Silicon Power Slim S55, a drive for systems on a diet

Subject: Storage | January 15, 2016 - 01:53 PM |
Tagged: silicon power, Slim S55, 240gb, Phison PS3110-S10, tlc

At 7mm the Silicon Power Slim S55 is perfect for older ultraportables that need a drive upgrade, though they will certainly slip into a 2.5" bay in any system.  The drive uses the Phison PS3110-S10, found in a variety of drives which Al compared last summer.  The controller is paired with a 128MB cache of Nanya DDR3 and TLC NAND, which lowers the price to an impressive $65 for the 240GB model.  It also performs decently, eTeknix saw 556MB/s in ATTO and 530MB/s in CDM; you can check out more tests in their full review here.

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"Silicon Power’s Slim series of solid state drives all come with a 7mm thickness, making them perfect for ultrabooks and similar portable computers that require this form factor. Traditional 2.5-inch mechanical drives mostly come with a 9.5mm thickness, ruling them out as an option. The Slim S55 SSD is the little brother in this series, but it doesn’t need to be ashamed of that."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

 

Source: eTeknix

Intel still manages a profit in a tough year

Subject: General Tech | January 15, 2016 - 12:55 PM |
Tagged: Intel, earnings

Even with the difficulties the PC market encountered over 2015 Intel still managed to make a good sized profit.  Compared to Q4 of 2014 their profits shrank a mere 1% down to $8.76bn,  a feat unequalled by other silicon slingers as the entire market shrunk by about 10%.  Their data centre group provided the most impressive results, a 5% increase in revenue likely spurred by the growth of hosting providers for the various Clouds which formed or grew over the past year.  The Inquirer also points out the release of the sixth generation of the Core family of processors certainly didn't hurt them either.

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"INTEL HAS POSTED strong quarterly profits in its fourth quarter earnings, revealing results that were higher than Wall Street was expecting despite a tough year for the PC market."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer
Author:
Subject: Displays
Manufacturer: Acer

UltraWide G-Sync Arrives

When NVIDIA first launched G-Sync monitors, they had the advantage of being first to literally everything. They had the first variable refresh rate technology, the first displays of any kind that supported it and the first ecosystem to enable it. AMD talked about FreeSync just a few months later, but it wasn't until March of 2015 that we got our hands on the first FreeSync enabled display, and it was very much behind the experience provided by G-Sync displays. That said, what we saw with that launch, and continue to see as time goes on, is that there are a much higher quantity of FreeSync options, with varying specifications and options, compared to what NVIDIA has built out. 

This is important to note only because, as we look at the Acer Predator X34 monitor today, the first 34-in curved panel to support G-Sync, it comes 3 months after the release of the similarly matched monitor from Acer that worked with AMD FreeSync. The not-as-sexyily-named Acer XR341CK offers a 3440x1440 resolution, 34-in curved IPS panel and a 75Hz refresh rate. 

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But, as NVIDIA tends to do, they found a way to differentiate its own products, with the help of Acer. The Predator X34 monitor has a unique look and style to it, and it improves the maximum refresh rate to 100Hz (although that is considered overclocking). The price is a bit higher too, coming in at $1300 or so on Amazon.com; the FreeSync-enabled XR341CK monitor sells for just $941.

Continue reading our review of the Acer Predator X34 G-Sync Monitor!!

EVGA Z170 Motherboards to Support BCLK Overclocking Non-K CPUs

Subject: Motherboards | January 14, 2016 - 08:04 PM |
Tagged: unlocked, overclocking, oc, LGA 1151, Intel K series, Intel, evga, bios, BCLK

An upcoming BIOS update for EVGA Z170 motherboards to allow BCLK overclocking on non-K Intel processors.

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The news came from EVGA Product Manager Jacob Freeman via Twitter this afternoon:

Update: The new BIOS 1.07 enabling non-K BLCK OC is now available from EVGA.

We have been following the story of BCLK overclocking of locked Skylake CPUs since early last month, when Techspot published benchmarks from an Intel Core i3-6100 clocked at 4.70 GHz - thanks to a pre-release ASRock BIOS. The BIOS has since been released, and other vendors are updating their Z170 motherboards to support these locked processors as well, the latest being EVGA.

It remains to be seen if Intel will have anything to say about their cheaper "locked" processors becoming more attractive to potential overclockers, as the unlocked K parts have provided a nice profit margin for the company. So far, board partners are moving forward seemingly unimpeded with the updates to remove the overclocking limitations, and that's great news for enthusiasts.

Source: Twitter

Fatal1ty lends his Firepower to this 750W PSU

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 14, 2016 - 03:44 PM |
Tagged: modular psu, firepower 750W, fatal1ty, 80 Plus Gold

Bear with us on this one as there is a long strange story behind the new PSU maker which calls themselves Firepower.  A long time ago was PSU maker that ruled the roost who called themselves PC Power & Cooling, charging a premium over the competition but being worth every penny.  As the markets changed PCP&P found themselves lagging and so an apparently successful company called OCZ purchased them wholesale and begat their own line of PSUs.  Sadly all was not as it seemed at OCZ, the deals they offered were indeed too good to be true and to survive they had to amputate some portions of themselves and sell them.  The PSU portion, including the patents, was sold in 2014 to a new company which called themselves Firepower Technology and so we come to the FirePower Fatal1ty 750W.

This PSU is rated as a 80 Plus Gold model with a 5 year warranty which speaks to the confidence of Firepower.  It uses a single 12V rail capable of delivering 62.5A and the modular cables include four 6+2 PCIe, six Molex , and eight SATA connectors, enough to power a dual GPU system. [H]ard|OCP cracked the PSU open and found it to be the same design as a SilverStone ST75F-GS V2 with a mix of components, none of which stood out as being top of the line.  In the end the design was good enough to pass every test [H] threw at it but with a relatively high price it did not come off with an award.

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"The Fatal1ty Series PSUs by Firepower Technology may seem to be something new in the world of computer power supplies, but really it is not. That said, Firepower is somewhat new in the PSU world, so let's see where they are headed right now."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Meet the new AMD Opteron A1100 Series SoC with ARM onboard

Subject: Processors | January 14, 2016 - 02:26 PM |
Tagged: opteron a1100, amd

The chip once known as Seattle has arrived from AMD, the Opteron A1100 Series which is built upon up to eight cores based on a 64-bit ARM Cortex-A57.  The chips will have up to 4 MB of shared L2 cache and 8 MB L3 cache with an integrated dual-channel memory controller that supports up to 128 GB of DDR3 or DDR4 memory.  For connectivity options you will have two 10Gb Ethernet ports, 8 lanes of PCIe 3.0 and up to 14 SATA3 devices.

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As you can see above the TDPs range from 25W to 32W, perfect for power conscious data centres.  The SoftIron Overdrive 3000 systems will use the new A1100 chips and AMD is working with Silver Lining Systems to integrate SLS’ fabric technology for interconnecting systems. 

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TechARP has posted a number of slides from AMD's presentation or you can head straight over to AMD to get the scoop.  You won't see these chips on the desktop but new server chips are great news for AMD's bottom line in the coming year.  They also speak well of AMD's continued innovations, using low powered and low cost 64-bit ARM chips, combined with their interconnect technologies opens up a new market for AMD.

Full PR is available after the break.

Source: AMD

BitFenix Introduces Spectre Xtreme Fans for CPU Coolers

Subject: Cases and Cooling | January 14, 2016 - 01:59 PM |
Tagged: bitfenix, case fan, cpu fan, static pressure, air cooling, Spectre Xtreme

BitFenix has introduced a line of Spectre dual-frame fans based on the Pro series with their new Xtreme high static pressure fans. These are made with CPU cooling in mind, and are available in both black (without LEDs) and multiple color LED options.

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The Spectre Xtreme fans operate from 950 - 2000 RPM with newly-designed fan blades for airflow up to 66 CFM with "optimum static pressure", making them "an ideal choice for liquid cooling solutions". The fans use fluid dynamic bearings for reduced noise levels, as well as increased efficiency and life expectancy, according to BitFenix.

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"With the introduction of dual frame design of the BitFenix Spectre Pro series we raised the standards of system fans to a new level. The new BitFenix Spectre Xtreme fans offer many features redefining the standards of cooling fans. Spectre Xtreme gives you the best performance and aesthetics using the latest in cooling fan technology and innovative designs.

Cooling fans used in liquid cooling systems not only need to have a high airflow but also they need to be optimized for static pressure. The newly designed blades of the Spectre Xtreme not only look good but also improve the airflow of the fan to 66CFM while maintaining optimum static pressure. This makes the Spectre Xtreme fans an ideal choice for liquid cooling solutions."

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In addition to black, the LED versions are available in white, blue, red, and a green color which BitFenix has taken “special care…to match the Green LED with the light emitted from NVIDIA GeForce GTX stock coolers”.

Source: BitFenix

Intel expands its grasp into wearables and robots

Subject: General Tech | January 14, 2016 - 01:15 PM |
Tagged: Intel, drone, wearables, realsense, DOMINATION

Intel is planning on getting inside a wider variety of pants, as well as drones and robots in the very near future, diversifying out of a PC market which has not been growing at an attractive place for over a year.  They certainly have the budget to do so as well as several technologies which will give them powerful leverage in those markets.  One example that immediately leaps to mind is selling drones with Intel RealSense sensors installed, the extra functionality that would be added to the drone would be impressive.  Intel's Curie SoC will be found in eyeglasses and clothing in the not too distant future and they have partnered with robot manufacturers to ensure their chips will compatible with the wide variety of operating systems used in controlling robots.  You can glean more about their plans over at The Register.

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"The need to control not just the processor itself, but the whole surrounding software and connectivity platform, was very clear in Intel’s launches and keynotes a last week's Consumer Electronics Show."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Podcast #382 - News from CES 2016, R9 Nano price cut, 13TB SSD and more

Subject: General Tech | January 14, 2016 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: video, ultrasharp, synology, supermicro, Seagate, r9 nano, podcast, oled, dell, Dark Power Pro, CES 2016, CES, carizzo, be quiet!, amd, 13tb ssd, 10TB

PC Perspective Podcast #382 - 01/14/2016

Join us this week as we wrap up news from CES 2016, discuss the R9 Nano price cut, ponder a 13TB SSD and more!

You can subscribe to us through iTunes and you can still access it directly through the RSS page HERE.

The URL for the podcast is: http://pcper.com/podcast - Share with your friends!

  • iTunes - Subscribe to the podcast directly through the iTunes Store
  • RSS - Subscribe through your regular RSS reader
  • MP3 - Direct download link to the MP3 file

Hosts: Ryan Shrout, Jeremy Hellstrom, Josh Walrath, and Allyn Malventano

Subscribe to the PC Perspective YouTube Channel for more videos, reviews and podcasts!!

Fixstars Launches 13TB 2.5" SATA SSD Geared Towards Media Streaming

Subject: Storage | January 13, 2016 - 09:57 PM |
Tagged: ssd, sata, Fixstars, 13TB

Got a high bandwidth video camera that fills a piddly 4TB SSD in too short of a time? How about a 13TB SSD!

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Fixstars certainly gets cool points for launching such a high capacity SSD, but there are a few things to consider here. These are not meant to be written in a random fashion and are primarily geared towards media creation (8k RAW video). Filling at saturated SATA bandwidth, these will take about 7 hours to fill, and just as long to empty onto that crazy high end editing machine. But hey, if you can afford 13TB of flash (likely ~$13,000) just to record your video content, then your desktop should be even beefier.

The take home point here is that this is not a consumer device, and it would not work out well even for pro gamers with money to burn. The random write performance is likely poor enough that it could not handle a Steam download over a high end broadband link.

Full press blast after the break.

Source: Fixstars
Author:
Subject: Editorial
Manufacturer: Patreon
Tagged: video, patreon

Thank you for all you do!

Much of what I am going to say here is repeated from the description on our brand new Patreon support page, but I think a direct line to our readers is in order.

First, I think you may need a little back story. Ask anyone that has been doing online media in this field for any length of time and they will tell you that getting advertisers to sign on and support the production of "free" content has been getting more and more difficult. You'll see this proven out in the transition of several key personalities of our industry away from media into the companies they used to cover. And you'll see it in the absorption of some of our favorite media outlets, being purchased by larger entities with the promise of being able to continue doing what they have been doing. Or maybe you've seen it show as more interstitial ads, road blocks, sponsored site sections, etc. 

At PC Perspective we've seen the struggle first hand but I have done my best to keep as much of that influence away from my team. We are not immune - several years ago we started doing site skins, something we didn't plan for initially. I do think I have done a better than average job keeping the lights on here though, so to speak. We have good sell through on our ad inventory and some of the best companies in our industry support the work we do. 

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Some of the PC Perspective team at CES 2016

Let me be clear though - we aren't on the verge of going out of business. I am not asking for Patreon supporters to keep from firing anyone. We just wanted to maintain and grow our content library and capability and it seemed like the audience that benefits and enjoys that content might be the best place to start.

Some of you are likely asking yourself if supporting PC Perspective is really necessary? After all, you can chug out a 400 word blog in no time! The truth is that high quality, technical content takes a lot of man hours and those hours are expensive. Our problem is that to advertisers, a page view is a page view, they don't really care how much time and effort went into creating the content on that page. If we spend 20 hours developing a way to evaluate variable refresh rate monitors with an oscilloscope, but put the results on a single page at pcper.com, we get the same amount of traffic as someone that just posts an hour's worth of gameplay experiences. Both are valuable to the community, but one costs a lot more to produce.

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Frame Rating testing methodology helped move the industry forward

The easy way out is to create click bait style content (have you seen the new Marvel trailer??!?) and hope for enough extra page views to make up for the difference. But many people find the allure of the cheap/easy posts too easy and quickly devolve into press releases and marketing vomit. No one at PC Perspective wants to see that happen here.

Not only do we want to avoid a slide into that fate but we want to improve on what we are doing, going further down the path of technical analysis with high quality writing and video content. Very few people are working on this kind of writing and analysis yet it is vitally important to those of you that want the information to make critical purchasing decisions. And then you, in turn, pass those decisions on to others with less technical interest (brothers, mothers, friends). 

We have ideas for new regular shows including a PC Perspective Mailbag, a gaming / Virtual LAN Party show and even an old hardware post-mortem production. All of these take extra time beyond what each person has dedicated today and the additional funding provided by a successful Patreon campaign will help us towards those goals.

I don't want anyone to feel that they are somehow less of a fan of PC Perspective if you can't help - that's not what we are about and not what I stand for. Just being here, reading and commenting on our work means a lot to us. You can still help by spreading the word about stories you find interesting or even doing your regular Amazon.com shopping through our link on the right side bar.

But for those of you that can afford a monthly contribution, consider a "value for value" amount. How much do you think the content we have produced and will produce is worth to you? If that's $3/month, thank you! If that's $20/month, thank you as well! 

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Support PC Perspective through Patreon

http://www.patreon.com/pcper

The team and I spent a lot of our time in the last several weeks talking through this Patreon campaign and we are proud to offer ourselves up to our community. PC Perspective is going to be here for a long time, and support from readers like you will help us be sure we can continue to improve and innovate on the information and content we provide.

Again, thank you so much for support over the last 16 years!

Microsoft Releases Windows 10 Insider Build 11099

Subject: General Tech | January 13, 2016 - 08:18 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

The second Insider release on the “Redstone” branch has been pushed to Fast ring users. Once again, this has basically no release notes because a lot of features are “under the hood.” The push with Windows 10 since just before the holidays is to create a sensible structure for various teams to target with their changes. You could imagine how difficult this gets when you're dealing with phones, IoT, tablets and convertibles, HoloLens, and high-performance workstations, across a few different architectures.

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Insiders who are interested in UX updates and other features will probably be best to switch to “Slow” for a handful of builds once they find one that's stable for them. I can't really see this being useful for most Insiders, because unlike open-source previews where you can contribute to (or develop software alongside of) the internal tweaks, all you really can do is report when something is broken or acting funny. If that's what you want, then it's great that Microsoft is providing these previews.

Source: Microsoft