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PCPer Live! AMD Radeon Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway!

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 09:08 PM |
Tagged: video, radeon software, radeon, live, giveaway, freesync, crimson, contest, amd

UPDATE: Did you miss today's live stream? No worries! You can get the full rundown of the new Radeon Software Crimson Edition driver and get details on new features like FreeSync Low Frame Rate Compensation, DX9 frame pacing, custom resolutions, and more. Check out the video embed below.

It's nearly time for the holidays to begin but that doesn't mean the hardware and software news train comes to a halt! This week we are hosting AMD in the PC Perspective offices for a live stream to discuss the upcoming release of the new AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition. Earlier in the month we showed you a preview of what changes were coming to the AMD GPU driver and now we are going to not only demo it for you but let the community ask AMD questions directly about it!


And what's a live stream without prizes? AMD has stepped up to the plate to offer up some awesome hardware for those of you that tune in to watch the live stream! 

  • 2 x AMD Radeon R9 Nano 4GB Fiji Graphics Cards
  • 2 x PowerColor PCS+ Radeon R9 380 Graphics Cards




AMD Radeon Software Crimson Live Stream and Giveaway

12pm PT / 3pm ET - November 24th

PC Perspective Live! Page

Need a reminder? Join our live mailing list!

The event will take place Tuesday, November 24th at 12pm PT / 3pm ET at http://www.pcper.com/live. There you’ll be able to catch the live video stream as well as use our chat room to interact with the audience. To win the prizes you will have to be watching the live stream, with exact details of the methodology for handing out the goods coming at the time of the event.

I will be joined by Adrian Costelo, Product Manager for Radeon Software, and Steven Gans, UX Designer for Radeon Software. In short, these are the two people you want to hear from and have answer your questions!

If you have questions, please leave them in the comments below and we'll look through them just before the start of the live stream. Of course you'll be able to tweet us questions @pcper and we'll be keeping an eye on the IRC chat as well for more inquiries. What do you want to know and hear from AMD?

So join us! Set your calendar for Tuesday at 12pm PT / 3pm ET and be here at PC Perspective to catch it. If you are a forgetful type of person, sign up for the PC Perspective Live mailing list that we use exclusively to notify users of upcoming live streaming events including these types of specials and our regular live podcast. I promise, no spam will be had!

Source: PCPer Live!
Manufacturer: AMD

FreeSync and Frame Pacing Get a Boost

Make sure you catch today's live stream we are hosting with AMD to discuss much more about the new Radeon Software Crimson driver. We are giving away four Radeon graphics cards as well!! Find all the information right here.

Earlier this month AMD announced plans to end the life of the Catalyst Control Center application for control of your Radeon GPU, introducing a new brand simply called Radeon Software. The first iteration of this software, Crimson, is being released today and includes some impressive user experience changes that are really worth seeing and, well, experiencing.

Users will no doubt lament the age of the previous Catalyst Control Center; it was slow, clunky and difficult to navigate around. Radeon Software Crimson changes all of this with a new UI, a new backend that allows it to start up almost instantly, as well as a handful of new features that might be a surprise to some of our readers. Here's a quick rundown of what stands out to me:

  • Opens in less than a second in my testing
  • Completely redesigned and modern user interface
  • Faster display initialization
  • New clean install utility (separate download)
  • Per-game Overdrive (overclocking) settings
  • LiquidVR integration
  • FreeSync improvements at low frame rates
  • FreeSync planned for HDMI (though not implemented yet)
  • Frame pacing support in DX9 titles
  • New custom resolution support
  • Desktop-based Virtual Super Resolution
  • Directional scaling for 2K to 4K upscaling (Fiji GPUs only)
  • Shader cache (precompiled) to reduce compiling-induced frame time variance
  • Non-specific DX12 improvements
  • Flip queue size optimizations (frame buffer length) for specific games
  • Wider target range for Frame Rate Target Control


That's quite a list of new features, some of which will be more popular than others, but it looks like there should be something for everyone to love about the new Crimson software package from AMD.

For this story today I wanted to focus on two of the above features that have long been a sticking point for me, and see how well AMD has fixed them with the first release of Radeon Software.

FreeSync: Low Frame Rate Compensation

I might be slightly biased, but I don't think anyone has done a more thorough job of explaining and diving into the differences between AMD FreeSync and NVIDIA G-Sync than the team at PC Perspective. Since day one of the G-Sync variable refresh release we have been following the changes and capabilities of these competing features and writing about what really separates them from a technological point of view, not just pricing and perceived experiences. 

Continue reading our overview of new features in AMD Radeon Software Crimson!!

Windows 10 Tool Now Reverted to Build 10240

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2015 - 08:15 PM |
Tagged: windows 10, microsoft

UPDATE (Nov 24th, 8pm ET): As I was informed, both on Twitter and in the comments, the update has been restored. Apparently the issue was that this tool, when upgrading Windows 10 to Windows 10 1511, accidentally reset four privacy settings to default. They also happened to be four of the less-severe ones, such as whether to allow apps to run in the background and whether settings should sync between devices. It has apparently been fixed and the tool will install the latest version of Windows 10 once more.

Source: Ars Technica

Regardless of your opinion about Windows 10, I'm glad that Microsoft has once again provided a way to force a specific version on your device. Their recent statement, telling users that Windows Update will give them the correct build eventually, is not comforting if someone is failing to receive the update. Is it coming? Or did it block for some reason? I also wonder if the 30-day policy would still be enforced, making clean installs that much more annoying. Turns out it was all hypothetical, and Microsoft was planning on reinstating it instantly, though.

This is a bit surprising and disappointing. When the November 2015 update for Windows 10 went live, existing users could upgrade with Windows Update (if it let them) and the rest could force an in-place upgrade from Windows 7, 8.x, and earlier builds of Windows 10 using the tool. The latter method has apparently been reverted to the original Windows 10 build from July 2015.


This image is getting a lot more use than I intended.

Why? Who knows. They are still offering the update through Windows Update, and Microsoft claims that they have no intention of pulling it. This concerns me, because there are a few situations where Windows 10 updates will get stuck, such as if you get it through Windows Update then uninstall it. I have not seen any report cover the official procedure for this issue. Also, I wonder if there's a way to get past Microsoft's 30-day no-update policy.

According to WinBeta, Microsoft's official statement contains the following: “Microsoft has not pulled the Windows 10 November 10 update. The company is rolling out the November update over time – if you don’t see it in Windows Update, you will see it soon.” (Emphasis not mine.)

We'll probably hear more about this as the week goes on.

Source: WinBeta

Fix Coming for AMD Radeon Software Crimson Edition

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 29, 2015 - 05:25 PM |
Tagged: amd, graphics driver, radeon, crimson

Users have been reporting that the latest AMD graphics driver, Radeon Software Crimson Edition, has been incorrectly setting fan speeds. Some users report that the driver spins up fans to 100% and others report that they slow down to 30% regardless of load.


Over the weekend, AMD acknowledged the issue and claim that a fix is intended for Monday.

Some users also claim that the card will stick with that fan setting until it cooks itself. This seems odd to me, since GPUs (and CPUs of course) are now designed to down-volt if temperatures reach unsafe levels, and even cut power entirely if heat cannot be managed. We haven't really seen reports of graphics cards cooking themselves since the Radeon HD 5000 series implemented hardware in response to Furmark and OCCT. That said, the driver bug might some how override these hardware protections.

In the mean time, you'll either want to keep an eye on your fan settings and reset them as necessary, or roll back to the previous driver. AMD didn't comment on the high fan speed issue that some were complaining about, so I'm not sure if this fix will address both issues.

Security Professionals Find eDellRoot Superfishy

Subject: Systems | November 23, 2015 - 09:25 PM |
Tagged: dell, superfish, edellroot

The pun was too tempting, but don't take it too seriously even though it's relatively similar. In short, Dell installs a long-lived, root certificate on their machines with a private key that is now compromised (because they didn't exactly protect it too well). This certificate, and the compromised private key, can be used to sign secure connections without needing to be verified by a Certificate Authority. In other words, it adds a huge level of unwarranted trust to phishing and man-in-the-middle attacks.


Dell has not really made any public comment on this issue yet. I don't really count the tweet from Dell Cares, because customer support is a terrible source for basically any breaking news. It's best to wait until Dell brings out an official statement through typical PR channels before assuming what their position is. Regardless of what they say, of course, your security will be heavily reduced until the certificate and eDell plug-in are removed from your device.

I'm really just wondering if Dell will somehow apologize, or stick to their guns.

Source: Duo Security

Deals of the Day: 960GB SSD for $199, $69 Athlon X4, GTX 970 Price Drop

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2015 - 02:55 PM |
Tagged: SanDisk Ultra II, MSI GTX 970 Gaming, GTX 970, 960GB SSD

The internet is full of sales this week, and there are some great PC hardware deals out there beginning with the best price per GB on an SSD we've ever seen.


At $199.99 shipped this 960 GB SanDisk Ultra II SSD is a stunning $0.20/GB, and offers good speeds for a SATA III drive with up to 550 MB/s reads and 500 MB/s writes, along with "n-Cache 2.0" which SanDisk explains is "a large, non-volatile write cache (which) consolidates small writes to boost random write performance".

What better to fill up that huge SSD than a library of games, and if you're in the market for a new graphics card to drive them there are some excellent deals out there. A good mid-range GPU option is the oft-maligned NVIDIA GeForce GTX 970, and memory controversy aside it's a very high performer for the money. Lately prices have dropped a bit, and there some great options out there when you factor in rebates.


While you can find some lower-cost GTX 970's out there this is a good deal for one of MSI's overclocked Gaming series cards. And if you're looking for a quad-core processor to help drive a new GPU, how about AMD's ultra-affordable Athlon X4 860k, now under $70!


It's nice to see prices starting to drop on some solid upgrades, and we're currently working on our annual holiday gift guide with more recommendations for a tech-filled holiday season. Stay tuned!

AMD is the new King of Crimson

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 24, 2015 - 01:36 PM |
Tagged: radeon software, radeon, low frame rate compensation, freesync, frame pacing, crimson, AMD VISION Engine

In case you thought we missed something in our discussion of the new AMD Crimson software you can check out what some of the other websites thought of the new release.  The Tech Report is a good first stop, they used the Fable Legends DX 12 to test the improvements to frametime which will be of interest to those who do not obsess over DX 9 games and their performance.  They also delve a bit more into the interface so you can see what the new screens will look at as well as learning the path that will take you to a familiar settings screen.  Check out their impressions right here.


"AMD's Radeon Software Crimson Edition is the second in a line of major annual graphics driver updates from the company. Crimson also replaces the Catalyst Control Center software with a faster, more refined utility called Radeon Settings. We dug in to see what Crimson has to offer."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

AMD GPU Architectures pre-GCN Are Now Legacy

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 26, 2015 - 03:09 PM |
Tagged: amd, graphics drivers, GCN, terascale

The Graphics Core Next (GCN) architecture is now a minimum requirement for upcoming AMD graphics drivers. If your graphics card (or APU) uses the TeraScale family of microarchitectures, then your last expected WHQL driver is AMD Catalyst 15.7.1 for Windows 7, 8.x, and 10. You aren't entirely left out of Radeon Software Crimson Edition, however. The latest Crimson Edition Beta driver is compatible with TeraScale, but the upcoming certified one will not be.


GCN was introduced with the AMD Radeon HD 7000 series, although it was only used in the Radeon HD 7700 series GPUs and above. The language doesn't seem to rule out an emergency driver release, such as if Microsoft breaks something in a Windows 10 update that causes bluescreens and fire on older hardware, but they also don't say that they will either. NVIDIA made a similar decision to deprecate pre-Fermi architectures back in March of 2014, which applied to the release of GeForce 343 Drivers in September of that year. Extended support for NVIDIA's old cards end on April 1st, 2016.

I wonder why AMD chose a beta driver to stop with, though. If AMD intended to support TeraScale with Crimson, then why wouldn't they keep it supported until at the first WHQL-certified version? If they didn't intend to support TeraScale, then why go through the effort of supporting it with the beta driver? This implies that AMD reached a hurdle with TeraScale that they didn't want to overcome. That may not be the case, but it's the first thing that comes to my mind none-the-less. Probably the best way to tell is to see how people with Radeon HD 6000-series (or lower-end 7000/8000-series) cards work with Radeon Software Crimson Beta.

Likely the last drivers that users with Radeon HD 6000-series graphics need are 15.7.1 or Radeon Software Crimson Edition Beta. We will soon learn which of the two will be best long-term.

Or, of course, you can buy a newer GPU / APU when you get a chance.

Source: AMD

What the hell Dell?

Subject: General Tech | November 24, 2015 - 12:42 PM |
Tagged: dell, superfish, security, edellroot

As Scott mentioned yesterday, Dell refused to learn from Lenovo's lesson and repeated the exact same mistake with eDellRoot, a self-signed root CA cert with an unknown purpose.  Unlike SuperFish which was to allow targeted ads to be displayed eDellRoot serves an unclear purpose apart from a mention of Microsoft-like "easier customer support" but it exposes you to the exact same security risks as SuperFish does.  You could remove the cert manually, however as it resides in Dell.Foundation.Agent.Plugins.eDell.dll it will return on next boot and can return on fresh Windows installs via Dell driver updates, something which will be of great concern to their business customers.

Dell has finally responded to the issue, "The recent situation raised is related to an on-the-box support certificate intended to provide a better, faster and easier customer support experience. Unfortunately, the certificate introduced an unintended security vulnerability." and provided a process to remove the certificate from the machine permanently in this Word Document.  You can check for the presence of the cert on your machine in those two links. 

However the best was yet to come as researchers have found a second cert as well as an expired Atheros Authenticode cert for BlueTooth and private key on a limited amount of new Dell computers as well.  As Dell made no mention of these additional certificates in their statement to the press it is hard to give them the benefit of the doubt.  The Bluetooth cert will not make you vulnerable to a man in the middle attack however the second cert is as dangerous as eDellRoot and can be used to snoop on encrypted communications.  The second cert was found on a SCADA machine which is, as they say, a bad thing. 

We await Dell's response to the second discovery as well as further research to determine how widespread the new certs actually are.  So far Dell XPS 15 laptops, M4800 workstations, and Inspiron desktops and laptops have been found to contain these security issues.  The chances of you falling victim to a man in the middle attack thanks to these security vulnerabilities are slim but not zero so be aware of them and keep your eyes out for them on your systems.  With Lenovo and Dell both being caught, it will be interesting to see if HP and other large vendors will learn this lesson or if it will take a third company being caught exposing their customers to unnecessary risks.


"A second root certificate and private key, similar to eDellRoot along with an expired Atheros Authenticode cert and private key used to sign Bluetooth drivers has been found on a Dell Inspiron laptop. The impact of these two certs is limited compared to the original eDellRoot cert."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Slashdot

There's data in dem der lightbulbs; moves really fast too!

Subject: General Tech | November 25, 2015 - 12:53 PM |
Tagged: wireless, li-fi, 1GBps

Li-Fi is a new experimental wireless data transmission technology which sends data using the same lights that illuminate the space you are in, at such frequencies and intensities that your brain does not process any change in lighting which your eyes might capture.  It transmits at an incredible speed, under perfect conditions in the the lab they saw 224GBps and recently have successfully transmitted at 1GBps in the field.  Yes, that is 1GB per second of data transfer, light travels rather quickly after all.  There are limits on where this technology can be used, in large spaces signals from different lights could interfere with each other and if you are outside then you will not be able to benefit but for offices and the home this could be rather impressive to behold.  Read more about the researchers and how these lightbulbs could be tied into existing lighting at The Inquirer.


"BOFFINS HAVE field tested Li-Fi for the first time, achieving wireless speeds 100 times faster than WiFi."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: The Inquirer

Don't have two M.2 slots? No problems!

Subject: Storage | November 26, 2015 - 07:13 PM |
Tagged: M.2, pcie, sata 6Gbs, Silverstone, ECM20

That's right, no matter if you run iOS, Linux or Windows if you have an M key style M.2 port the Silverstone ECM20 add-on card will give you both a PCI-e M.2 slot and a SATA 6Gbs M.2 slot.  The board itself is a mounting point, no controller but simply a way to transfer data from a PCI-e M.2 card or a mount for a SATA style card, you provide the cable.  The simplcity ensures that your transfer speeds will match what you would expect from a native slot as the tests at Benchmark Reviews show.  At less than $20 it is a great way to expand your high speed storage capacity.


"The m.2 form factor is becoming popular for SSDs due to its small size, and, in PCI-E guise, superior performance. As our recent test of the Samsung 950 Pro m.2 SSD has shown, PCI-E m.2 SSDs offer performance many times that of the very best SATA SSDs, so if you’re looking for a storage upgrade, m.2 is definitely the way to go."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:


Old Video About an Older Gaming System...

Subject: General Tech | November 29, 2015 - 07:33 AM |
Tagged: snes, retro, Nintendo

So I missed this one until yesterday, when Dave Voyles of Microsoft tweeted it out. While the video was published in 2011, it doesn't have too many views and this topic only gets better with age (pretty much).


Image Credit: "Wikipedia SNES PAL" by JCD1981NL - Own work
Licensed under CC BY 3.0 via Commons

The narrator opens up a Super Nintendo, which is a PAL kit for North Americans wondering why the casing looks so different. The console has a dedicated CPU, RAM, two sound processors with RAM, and a four-package video chipset of two graphics chips and two VRAM packages. The two video chips, each paired with a package of RAM, are used in tandem but apparently cannot see into each others memory. This reminds me of the split-memory architecture on the PS3, which provides 256MB to the Cell processor and 256MB to the NVIDIA GPU.

Another interesting note is that, because the sound system has its own 8-bit Sony processor, sound effects and music will continue to play when the main system freezes. I never really thought about it until I watched this video, but I believe I've actually experienced that a few times in the early/mid 90s. I just never thought much about it because computers were still somewhat magical back then.

Source: YouTube

NVIDIA Grants $200,000 to UoT for Cancer Research

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 29, 2015 - 05:52 PM |
Tagged: nvidia, cancer research, gpgpu

The University of Toronto has just received a $200,000 grant from the NVIDIA Foundation for research in identifying genetic links to cancer. The institution uses GPUs to learn and identify mutations that cause the disease, which is hoped to eventually help diagnose the attributes of cancer for a specific patient and provide exact treatments. Their “next step” is comparing their technology with data from patients.


I am not too informed on cancer research, so I will point to the article and its sources for specifics. The team state that the libraries they create will be freely available for other biomedical researchers. They don't mention specific licenses or anything, but the article is not really an appropriate venue for that sort of discussion.

Source: nvidia

PC Gaming Services Want Your Black Friday Money Too

Subject: General Tech | November 26, 2015 - 11:22 PM |
Tagged: uplay, steam, pc gaming, origin, GOG

While everyone's in a turkey and gravy coma, retailers are hoping that you'll feel a bit browsy with your drowsy. Black Friday deals are popping up everywhere; some are good, but some are token at best... including the Black Friday sale on tokens at the local arcade.

Too soon?


Anyway, four (edit: Fixed typo) of the largest PC gaming services are Steam, UPLAY, Origin, and GOG.com. Steam is predictably the largest sale. It's another “Exploration Sale,” which is another way of saying, “Here's a few examples of great deals; browse for crap you like. You might find something cheaper. I dunno.” Speaking of a few examples, Elite Dangerous is now just a third of its price. Grand Theft Auto V is now reduced too, although it's not yet in the impulse buy territory. Call of Duty Black Ops III also received a little chop in price, which is unusual for the franchise. You'll probably want to browse Steam in general, especially if there's a game that you've been eying but couldn't justify buying yet.

UPlay's sale is a bit more... weird. If you played Tropico 5 but put it down before buying the DLC, the pack of boosters is now 75% off ($11 CDN here). Surprisingly, the vast majority of sales have nothing to do with Ubisoft titles, and the three exceptions are from 2013 / 2014.

Origin is a bit more rounded in terms of old and new titles. FIFA 16, released just this fall, is about 40% off where I am. Tomb Raider is in the mid-single digits of dollars. Battlefield Hardline is about $10. Do not buy The Witcher 3 here though, if the Canadian prices carry over to the US. The sale even extends back to Command & Conquer: The Ultimate Collection, NHL 09, and Medal of Honor: Airborne. It just keeps scrolling.

Now for GOG. This is, again, a sale that you should probably browse. If you were interested in The Witcher 3, purchasing it from GOG instead of Steam will get you the same sale but DRM-free. Its new price is $29.99 USD, unless you're Canadian. We get it for $23.49 USD at GOG or $29.99 CDN at Steam. I guess they feel like giving a slightly larger discount to compensate for the lack of turkey-goggles. Browse the “On Sale” tab in the bottom right before you leave too.

Even more keyboards, check out Thermaltake's Poseidon Z RGB

Subject: General Tech | November 23, 2015 - 03:16 PM |
Tagged: poseidon Z RGB, thermaltake, mechanical keyboard, input

The keyboard market has changed drastically over the past year with the introduction of mainstream mechanical keys and improved LED backlighting features.  Where once the market was not that competitive and only a few major players were offering products we now have a wide variety of brands to choose from.  This makes it hard to stand out in the market without adding extra features to your keyboards, which leads us to the Thermaltake Poseidon RGB.  This particular keyboard has an integrated 32-bit processor which allows you to choose between 16.8 million colors for each key.  The keys use Kailh Brown RGB switches, a less expensive clone of the Cherry MX Brown switches more commonly found on these types of boards.  Find out if they are good enough over at Benchmark Reviews.


"Just a few months ago, full RGB mechanical keyboards were rare beasts, and the inclusion of full per-key RGB lighting commanded a very high price, with some keyboards selling for almost $200.00. Now, prices are coming down rapidly and vendors are starting to compete on features, but how many more features are there left to add?"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Rumor About Samsung's Upcoming Flagship Phone

Subject: Mobile | November 28, 2015 - 09:05 PM |
Tagged: Samsung, s7, galaxy

The follow-up to the Samsung Galaxy S6 is already being rumored, which people are obviously calling the Galaxy S7. The last two phones were unveiled at Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, which takes place in late February / early March. Information coming out in November is a bit... early. Some sites believe that Samsung will announce the phone in January, but who knows? Some of the rumors are interesting, though.


The one that catches my attention is the potential inclusion of a microSD card slot. External storage is rare these days, with Google removing it from their Nexus line and severely limiting what apps can do with the contents. That said, Android 6.0, recently released for a few devices, made further changes to increase its capabilities. You can now use SD cards as internal storage, but only if you agree to format and encrypt the storage to use only on that device. While the recent batch of Nexus phones don't include a microSD card slot, the changes might be enough to sway third-party manufacturers to include a slot.

As a developer, it would certainly be nice, especially if you intend to develop software that uses an SD card. Makes sense, right? Purchasing a developer phone that has all the features you might want to target?

Speaking of developer phones, the upcoming device should have a top-of-the-line processor in it. Reports are split between the Snapdragon 820 and the Exynos 8890. If it's the latter, availability is expected Q1 2016; the former started sampling a few months ago and was launched on November 11th. As such, SoC availability should be ready if Samsung intends to launch the phone early, regardless of the chosen chip, but that's probably not the limiting factor. It is also entirely possible that Samsung could include different processors for different markets. Qualcomm was absent from the Galaxy S6 line, but the S5 had some sub-models using Qualcomm processors and others Samsung's own implementation.

Either way, they are fast processors that support OpenGL ES 3.1 + AEP at the very least. The Adreno 530 is rated for about 550 GFLOPs, which is a tiny bit faster than a GeForce 9800 GT, although with Vulkan-level feature support (provided correct drivers). Thankfully Google has been more friendly to Khronos-based standards, and Samsung even more so.

When will we know for sure? Don't know. How much will it cost? Don't know. What will it be officially called? Don't know, but anything other than Galaxy S7 would be surprising. Would it make sense for Samsung to shake up the date and other long-running details? Well, the Galaxy S6 launch was lackluster, so this would be the most likely time for them to be squirrely. We'll see.

Source: PCMag

Enermax updates its AIO coolers with the Liqmax II 120s

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 23, 2015 - 01:42 PM |
Tagged: AIO, enermax, liquimax II 120s, watercooling

Enermax's Liqmax II 120s is a relatively small AIO watercooler, the radiator is 154x120x27 mm (6.1x0.8x1.0") and will fit on any modern motherboard, Intel or AMD.  The two 120mm fans which come with the cooler are high static pressure fans with the moniker Batwing and have a physical screw on them which allows you to tune the fan speed manually.  Modders Inc were impressed with this cooler, it performed relatively well and quite quietly and the fact thatit sells for $75 doesn't hurt either. 


"When it comes to a new build I always keep cooling in mind. Not every rig I build has custom water reservoirs, custom piping or fancy radiators. Sometimes I just need a machine to work without spending an enormous amount of cash on custom parts. I find that All in One (AIO) cooling systems are easy to install, work well …"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk


Source: Modders Inc

ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti Announced

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 26, 2015 - 09:42 PM |
Tagged: asus, 980 Ti

As most of our readers are well aware, the graphics market is dominated by two GPU vendors, both of which sell chips and reference designs to add-in board partners. ASUS is one of the oldest add-in board partners. According to their anniversary website, ASUS even produced a card that was based on the S3 ViRGE/DX graphics chipset all the way back in 1996.


To celebrate their 20th anniversary, although they don't exactly state when they start counting, ASUS has released a few high-end versions of Maxwell-based graphics cards. This one is the ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti. It comes with a base clock speed of 1266 MHz, which boosts up to 1367 MHz as needed. This is quite high, considering the reference card is clocked at 1000 MHz and boosts to 1189 MHz, although overclocking the 980 Ti is not too difficult to begin with. Ryan got up to 1465 MHz with a reference card. The Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti might go even higher with its enhanced cooling and power delivery, and it's designed for liquid nitrogen if you're that type of enthusiast.


Speaking of liquid nitrogen features, the card advertises a “Memory Defroster” feature that looks rather extreme. I can't say that I've ever seen a graphics card get covered in a visible layer of ice, but I've also never attached it to a reservoir of liquid with a temperature that's easier to write in Kelvin than Celcius.

Is this a legit problem? Or does this seem like “anti-dust shield” to everyone else too?

The ASUS 20th Anniversary Gold Edition GTX 980 Ti ships this month.

Source: ASUS

Shame about the name but power over WiFi would be nice

Subject: General Tech | November 27, 2015 - 01:54 PM |
Tagged: poWiFi, wireless power, iot

It is going to take some work as it is not currently that impressive but the experiment at Cornell University shows that power over WiFi is not impossible.  The experiment was not all that impressive, they charged a Jawbone headset @ 2.3mA and after 2.5 hours which they managed to charge the battery to 41% over a distance of 5-7cm.  Those results are poor compared to Qi and other wireless charging solutions on the market but are promising.  The power is transmitted by a wireless router that can also send and receive data so for wireless cameras and other low powered devices which transmit data this could be quite useful.  You can read the research paper by following the links from Hack a Day.


"There have been a few reports of power over WiFi (PoWiFi) on the intertubes lately. If this is a real thing it’s definitely going to blow all of the IoT fanboys skirts up (sorry to the rest of you *buzzword* fanboys, the IoT kids flash-mobbed the scene and they mean business)."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

Thermaltake would like you to "Get to the Suppressa!"

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 27, 2015 - 03:04 PM |
Tagged: thermaltake, Suppressor F31

The Thermaltake Suppressor F31 is significantly smaller than the F51, 497x250x515mm (19.5x9.8x20.3") and so cannot fit an eATX motherboard like its bigger sibling.  On the other hand that size is much more manageable for many and is still large enough for radiators, Morry-sized heatsinks and full sized graphics cards.  The simplicity of the exterior will appeal to many as will the many removable filters over fan intakes.  As you might expect from the name, the case is designed to quiet the components running inside and did not disappoint when [H]ard|OCP tested the case.  Check out their full review if your PC components need a new home.


"Thermaltake is upping its computer case game with the new Suppressor F31 chassis. It is nice and wide at 250mm and has plenty of features. "Leading-edge sound reduction panels on all sides, expand your cooling options with removable panels for the perfect balance in silent operation and cooling performance."

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Source: [H]ard|OCP