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Infringe Trademarks in Style with UE4 Community Demos

Subject: General Tech | November 17, 2015 - 06:40 PM |
Tagged: ue4, Nintendo, maker, hobbyist

Okay this is just cool (albeit a little old news).

YouTube user CryZENx made a few tech demos that star classic video game characters, with modern, Unreal Engine 4-powered graphics. Samus has a glossy, metallic suit of armor. Goku launches bright Kamehameha blasts, as well as punches, kicks, and spins with his power pole, all while his tail wags and whips around behind him.

It is also one of the first demos that I've seen use NVIDIA FleX. One level has two spout of clear blue water. One flows over a pile of rigid bodies and splits in the corner of the world, and the other flows through two water wheels, which shape the spout before it blobs on the ground.


As always, be careful running what you download from the internet. That said, it doesn't trigger a permission escalation (UAC) or anything, so chances are that it is just a typical project cooked through Unreal Engine 4. Nintendo and others might be a bit upset at their trademarks being used, but it's a non-commercial tech demo for a hobbyist game developer.

They would be better off hiring them.

LG L15G Sunrise TracFone is $9.82 at Walmart

Subject: Mobile | November 17, 2015 - 06:01 PM |
Tagged: LG, tracfone, walmart

Don't expect much.

This $9.82 phone runs Android 4.4 KitKat with a 1.2 GHz, dual-core processor, which is backed by 512 MB of RAM. It has 4GB of internal storage, which LG advertises as having “up to 1.15 GB usable”. It is also listed as having about 7 hours of talk time, with almost 10 days of standby (although that is probably with next to nothing running). These components power a phone with a 3.8-inch, 480x320 display. It is not compatible with LTE, but it does have WiFi and 3G.


That said, the person writing this article is currently using an LG Optimus One from 2010, which runs Android 2.2 and doesn't even have enough on-device storage to install and use Firefox for Android. (My phone has ~60MB usable with basically nothing installed and a couple of built-in apps uninstalled.) So, for someone like me, this phone would actually be a step up and usable for something more than just phone calls.

... not much more, but maybe $10 worth of more?

Source: Walmart

When you need fast portable storage, the Kingston HyperX Savage Flash Drive

Subject: Storage | November 17, 2015 - 01:35 PM |
Tagged: kingston, hyper x savage, thumb drive, usb 3.1

Kingston has added a USB drive to their HyperX lineup, the Savage flash drive which connects via USB 3.1, albeit not with the new Type-C connector.  That standard theoretically allows faster transfers than the previous 3.0 standard, Kingston quotes 350MB/s read and 250MB/s write as the maximum speeds this drive is capable of.  Overclocker's Club tested the 128GB model, there are also 64GB and 256GB models available.  Their testing showed that the drive is capable of hitting those speeds in some scenarios and certainly performed faster than the Patriot drive they compared it against.  The speed does come at a premium, the 128GB model is $130 on Amazon.


"After running the HyperX Savage USB 3.1 drive through the test suite, it's hard not to like this drive. The quote on Kingston's web site is a performance rating of up to 350MB/s read and 250MB/s write. In a couple of tests, it surely got there covering both ends of the rating. However, in some tests it struggled to reach the rated 250MB/s write rating. Overall though, this has to be the highest performing flash drive I have tested to date."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:


Asus' Upcoming RT-AC5300 Router Is A Massive Tri-Band Router

Subject: Networking | November 17, 2015 - 12:56 PM |
Tagged: nitroQAM, mu-mimo, gigabit router, broadcom, asuswrt, asus, 802.11ac

Asus has officially launched the RT-AC5300, a massive replicator tri-band wireless router. The new router is fenced in by eight large antennas that allow the device to support 4 x 4 MU-MIMO wireless on two 5 GHz and one 2.4 GHz bands.


The menacing high-end wireless router supports the latest wired and wireless consumer networking technologies and runs the AsusWRT firmware. The RT-AC5300 is clad in black with red accents. The top of the router is mesh to facilitate cooling. In addition to the eight antennas, there are five gigabit Ethernet ports (up to two ports can be configured as WAN ports), a USB 3.0 port, one USB 2.0 port, and physical buttons for WPS, Wi-Fi, and LED on/off.

Powered by a Broadcom chipset, the router supports 802.11ac as well as older N/G/B Wi-Fi standards. Using NitroQAM technology, the two 5 GHz bands each support up to 2,167 Mbps speeds while the 2.4 GHz band tops out at 1,000 Mbps. This is a boost over the usual 1,734 Mbps for 5 GHz and 600 Mbps for 2.4 GHz wireless bandwidth numbers. Asus claims that the router can run all three bands simultaneously along with beamforming to improve the signal to devices by focusing the signal. Note that the combined advertised "5334 Mbps" of the router includes all three bands but a single device would max out at the 2,167 Mbps theoretical maximum of a single band. The router is capable of automatically figuring out and using the optimal band to communicate with each device based on its capabilities and signal strength.

When it comes to wired connections, the router has four 1 Gbps LAN ports. It also supports 802.3ad link aggregation which allows using two of the gigabit ports to create a single 2 Gbps link to supported devices like network attached storage (NAS) and workstations.

Asus is using ASUSWRT firmware along with AiRadar beamforming, AiProtect security, and a subscription to WTFast GPN which is a service aimed at gamers that reportedly delivers decreased pings and lower latency connections to game servers.

Pricing and availability have not been announced, but CNET is reporting an expected price of $400 USD.

To say that this router is overkill for most is an understatement, but it is packed with features and is ready to stream a Stargate SG-1 marathon to all your devices!

Source: Asus

Among the other things, Threshold 2 will finally honour your previous license

Subject: General Tech | November 17, 2015 - 12:37 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows 10

Scott covered a lot of what to expect from Threshold 2, the November update for Windows 10 but today we received another tidbit of information about the new release.  When you first upgraded to Windows 10 you probably noticed that your Win7/8 license was not honoured if you tried to do a fresh install after the upgrade.   As well, if you used software to determine the new license code, it was also not recognized for a fresh install and your only option to reinstall was to use the process found within Windows 10.  That will change with the arrival of the new update according to what The Inquirer was told, as long as you have record of your old Win7 or Win8 key you will be able to do a fresh new installation of Windows 10, presumably on the same hardware.  They also provided an estimate of how long the installation of this update will take, about one hour depending on the speed of your internet.


"That means if you start with a clean slate, your Windows 7 or 8 licence key just wouldn't work. The good news is that this problem has been fixed with the arrival of Threshold 2, and you can now use an old licence key to do a fresh installation."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Inquirer

New Intel NUC Models Listed with 6th-Gen Skylake Processors

Subject: Processors, Systems | November 17, 2015 - 11:21 AM |
Tagged: Skylake, NUC6i5SYK, NUC6i5SYH, NUC6i3SYK, NUC6i3SYH, nuc, mini-pc, Intel, i5-6260U, i3-6100U


(Image credit: PCMag)

NUC systems sporting the latest Intel 6th-gen Skylake processors are coming, with the NUC6i5SYH, NUC6i5SYK, NUC6i3SYH, NUC6i3SYK listed with updated Core i5 and i3 CPUs. As this is a processor refresh the appearance and product nomenclature remain unchanged (unfortunately).


The four new Skylake Intel NUC models listed on Intel's product page

Here's Intel's description of the Skylake Core i5-powered NUC6i5SYH:

"Intel NUC Kit NUC6i5SYH is equipped with Intel’s newest architecture, the 6th generation Intel Core i5-6260U processor. Intel Iris graphics 540 with 4K display capabilities provides brilliant resolution for gaming and home theaters. NUC5i5SYH has room for a 2.5” drive for additional storage and an M.2 SSD so you can transfer your data at lightning speed. Designed for Windows 10, NUC6i5SYH has the performance to stream media, manage spreadsheets, or create presentations."

The NUC6i5SYH and NUC6i5SYK feature the i5-6260U is a dual-core, Hyper-Threaded 15W part with a base speed of 1.9 GHz with up to 2.8 GHz Turbo. It has 4 MB cache and supports up to 32GB 2133 MHz DDR4. The processor also provides Intel Iris graphics 540 (Skylake GT3e), which offers 48 Execution Units and 64 MB of dedicated eDRAM. The lower-end NUC6i3SYH and NUC6i3SYK models offer the i3-6100U, which is also a dual-core, Hyper-Threaded part, but this 15W processor's speed is fixed at 2.3 GHz without Turbo Boost, and it offers the lesser Intel HD Graphics 520.

Availability and pricing are not yet known, but expect to see the new models for sale soon.

Source: Intel

AMD Plans Two GPUs in 2016

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 16, 2015 - 09:34 PM |
Tagged: amd, radeon, GCN

Late last week, Forbes published an editorial by Patrick Moorhead, who spoke with Raja Koduri about AMD's future in the GPU industry. Patrick was a Corporate Vice President at AMD until late 2011. He then created Moor Insights and Strategy, which provides industry analysis. He regularly publishes editorials to Forbes and CIO. Raja Koduri is the head of the Radeon Technologies Group at AMD.


I'm going to be focusing on a brief mention a little more than half-way through, though. According to the editorial, Raja stated that AMD will release two new GPUs in 2016. “He promised two brand new GPUs in 2016, which are hopefully going to both be 14nm/16nm FinFET from GlobalFoundries or TSMC and will help make Advanced Micro Devices more power and die size competitive.”

We have been expecting AMD's Artic Islands to arrive at some point in 2016, which will compete with NVIDIA's Pascal architecture at the high end. AMD's product stack has been relatively stale for a while, with most of the innovation occurring at the top end and pushing the previous top-end down a bit. Two new GPU architectures almost definitely mean that a second one will focus on the lower end of the market, making more compelling products on smaller processes to be more power efficient, cheaper per unit, and include newer features.

Add the recent report of the Antigua architecture, which I assume is in addition to AMD's two architecture announcement, and AMD's product stack could look much less familiar next year.

Source: Forbes

They may be relatively new but Raijintek knows what they were doing with the Triton 280

Subject: Cases and Cooling | November 16, 2015 - 05:53 PM |
Tagged: AIO, water cooling, raijintek, Triton 280

Before you dismiss the strange looking waterblock on the Raijintek Triton 280 you should know the kit ships with a red, green, and blue bottle of dye which is why you can see into the pump.  Not only that but this waterblock will fit onto any AMD or Intel processor released in the last decade so even an older system can be refreshed by this $80 cooler.  With the price, compatibility and style covered all that is left to do is measure the sound and see how effective the cooler is in action.  To do so all you have to do is vist [H]ard|OCP; prepare yourself to be impressed.


"Raijintek is a relatively new company and has only been producing products for a couple of years. Raijintek states it focuses on "extreme engineering, remarkable performance, amazing design," and several other things. Does this new Triton 280 AIO cooler hit any of those targets when it comes to cooling your CPU?"

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:


Source: [H]ard|OCP

Kaby Lake has overflowed onto the internet

Subject: General Tech | November 16, 2015 - 03:55 PM |
Tagged: Skylake, LGA 1151, leak, kaby lake, intel 200, Intel, cannon lake

Benchlife.info got hold of two slides from an Intel presentation for Kaby Lake which cover some of the features you can expect to find on the new processor family.  As with all leaks you should ensure you take a dosage of Sodium Chloride while looking through the information.


The Intel 200 chipset will provide up to 30 PCIe lanes, 24 of which can be dedicated to PCIe slots and another half dozen for SATA 6Gbps.  The chipset can also manage up to 10 USB 3.0 ports though do not expect to see all of these present on a board at the same time, there is only so much bandwidth to go around, as M.2 slots were not mentioned and will also share the PCIe pool.  If you are wondering what Intel Optane Technology is you can be forgiven as apparently calling it NVME support would be too easy.


As for the processor, it will remain LGA 1151 with power ranging from 35W to 95W which means it should be compatible with existing boards, assuming a UEFI update is released.  The processor will support hardware acceleration for 10-bit VP9 playback and 10-bit HVEC encoding, as well as supporting 5K video at 30Hz and 60Hz, impressive for an onboard GPU.  The processors will be unlocked and have enhanced BCLK overclocking as well.  As you would expect the CPU is ready for NVMe, Thunderbolt 3 and even Intel RealSense.  Follow the link if you want to give your translator program a workout.

Clueless for Christmas? Maybe this will help

Subject: General Tech | November 16, 2015 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: christmas

The holidays come along and people start wanting to know what is on your list but now that you are an adult anything you want you have probably bought and what is left are the extremely expensive items you can't immediately afford.  Perhaps this guide from The Tech Report might help you think of something you would like to receive or even better, something appropriate to give as a gift.  There are nice coffee makers, software, headphones and even a Wookie lunch bag in addition to hardware.  Spend a few moments to check out what else there is


"We know gift shopping can be hard at the best of times, so the TR staff has banded together to share our favorite gift recommendations for the PC enthusiast this year."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Subject: Processors, Mobile
Manufacturer: Intel

Skylake Architecture Comes Through

When Intel finally revealed the details surrounding it's latest Skylake architecture design back in August at IDF, we learned for the first time about a new technology called Intel Speed Shift. A feature that moves some of the control of CPU clock speed and ramp up away from the operating system and into hardware gives more control to the processor itself, making it less dependent on Windows (and presumably in the future, other operating systems). This allows the clock speed of a Skylake processor to get higher, faster, allowing for better user responsiveness.


It's pretty clear that Intel is targeting this feature addition for tablets and 2-in-1s where the finger/pen to screen interaction is highly reliant on immediate performance to enable improved user experiences. It has long been known that one of the biggest performance deltas between iOS from Apple and Android from Google centers on the ability for the machine to FEEL faster when doing direct interaction, regardless of how fast the background rendering of an application or web browser actually is. Intel has been on a quest to fix this problem for Android for some time, where it has the ability to influence software development, and now they are bringing that emphasis to Windows 10.

With the most recent Windows 10 update, to build v10586, Intel Speed Shift has finally been enabled for Skylake users. And since you cannot disable the feature once it's installed, this is the one and only time we'll be able to measure performance in our test systems. So let's see if Intel's claims of improved user experiences stand up to our scrutiny.

Continue reading our performance evaluation of Intel Speed Shift on the Skylake Architecture!!

Introduction and First Impressions

DEEPCOOL's Gabriel is part of their Gamer Storm series of products, and this low-profile design is rated up to 95 W to keep the latest processors cool under load. So how does it perform? We'll take a close look at the performance of this mini-ITX inspired air cooler in today's review.


(Image credit: DEEPCOOL)

There are so many inexpensive options for air cooling on the market that it's almost overwhelming. At the top of the list in popularity are low-cost tower coolers from Cooler Master, with the ubiquitous Hyper 212 Evo at around $30, and the slightly smaller Hyper T4 at $25. But with a height of 159 mm for the 212 Evo and 152.3 mm for the T4 these coolers are not going to fit in every situation - and certainly not in a slim enclosure. There are plenty of low-profile CPU coolers on the market, one of the lowest being the Noctua NH-L9i, a $40-ish cooler which stands just 37 mm tall (with the fan!), but the tan and reddish-brown color scheme isn't for everyone, and the ultra-low profile design (which is also limited to a 92 mm fan) won't be required for many builds.

So when I began looking for a low-profile air cooler for my own use recently one of the options that cought my eye was this Gabriel, part of DEEPCOOL's Gamer Storm line.  The Gabriel had the advantage of being just $34.99 on Newegg when I picked it up, making it less expensive (and less tan and brown) than the Noctua. At 60 mm tall with its 120 mm fan installed, the Gabriel should fit in most low-profile enclosures, considering even half-height expansion cards are a bit taller at about 69 mm. The Gabriel also offers an understated look with a grey (well, mostly grey) fan. Of course appearances mean nothing unless it's well made and cools effectively, and for myself the question became, is this going to rival the experience of a Noctua (long my preferred brand) CPU cooler?

Continue reading our review of the DEEPCOOL Gamer Storm Gabriel CPU cooler!!

Xbox One Controller Chatpad Now Available, Supports Consoles and Windows 10 PCs

Subject: General Tech | November 15, 2015 - 10:58 PM |
Tagged: xbox one, chatpad, microsoft

Microsoft released the Xbox One chatpad on Thursday, making it easier to chat with friends and browse the internet thanks to the full QWERTY keyboard. The pad plugs into the bottom of the controller using both the proprietary connector and the 3.5mm audio jack. The chatpad then provides its own audio jack to plug a chat headset into.

The chatpad keyboard is back-lit features dedicated buttons to control the volume level, game and voice chat volume mix, and a microphone mute. it also has two user programmable keys (X1 and X2) that are usable only on the Xbox One although that functionality will not be available until "mid 2016" according to Microsoft. Currently, pressing the X1 and X2 function keys will take a screenshot and save the last 30 seconds of game play as a video clip respectively.

Xbox One Chatpad 1.jpg

The chatpad is compatible with all Xbox One controllers provided they are running the latest firmware. It can be used with both the Xbox One and Windows 10 PCs. Note that the Xbox One must be running the NXOE (New Xbox One Experience) update and Windows 10 must be updated to the November Update. Function keys only work with the Xbox One.

The chatpad and chat headset are available now from Amazon for $34.99.

Also read: 

Source: Microsoft

MSI Rolling Out Fanless Braswell-Powered Cubi N PC

Subject: General Tech | November 15, 2015 - 01:44 AM |
Tagged: msi, cubi n, SFF, fanless, Braswell, Intel Braswell

MSI will soon add a new small form factor PC to its Cubi lineup with the fanless Cubi N. Powered by an Intel “Braswell” SoC, the Cubi N is a silent PC capable of 4K video playback that fits in the palm of your hand.

Unlike the original Cubi bare-bones (which used a Broadwell Celeron), the Cubi N is fanless and uses a heatsink and a stylized wavy mesh case design for passive heat dissipation. The mini PC measures 116mm x 112mm x 44.47mm and is all black with rounded corners. The diagonal cut is gone from this model with the power button being in the front-left top corner instead.

Before diving into the internals, MSI has included two USB 3.0 ports and a combo headphone/mic audio jack on the front panel and HDMI, VGA, RJ45, and an additional two USB 3.0 ports on the back of the Cubi N.

MSI Cubi N Fanless SFF Mini PC.jpg

Not bad, but not the most extensive I/O and the VGA output is a bit of an odd choice (though at this point it should be essentially free to add).

Internally, MSI is using an Intel “Braswell” Celeron N3150 SoC with Intel HD Graphics. This SoC (6W TDP) is a four core 1.6 GHz part that can boost up to 2.08 GHz with 2MB L2 cache and HD Graphics with 12 execution units. Users can add up to 8GB of DDR3L memory along with a single mSATA SSD and one 2.5” hard drive (though this makes the PC a bit taller at 55.5mm). The Cubi N comes with an Intel 802.11ac Wi-Fi card plugged into an M.2 slot.

The Cubi N will come in black or white and will be generally available as a bare-bones system. According to FanlessTech, pre-configured models will also be available including a version with a 32GB mSATA SSD, 2GB RAM, and Windows 10 Home for $249. MSI is allegedly also working on bare-bones models based around the Braswell Pentium N3700 (2.4 GHz burst) and a cheaper Celeron N3000 processors.

The fanless SFF Cubi N is not yet available for purchase, but it should be coming soon for under $400 all-in (adding storage and memory, more if you want a non-Home version of Windows).

Source: MSI

Synology Introduces New RT1900ac Wireless Router

Subject: Networking | November 14, 2015 - 01:07 AM |
Tagged: synology, 802.11ac, 256-QAM, mu-mimo, 3x3, gigabit router, wireless router

Synology, a company best known for its home and small office network attached storage (NAS) devices, is branching out with its first wireless router. The Synology Router RT1900ac is a high end 802.11ac Wi-Fi enabled router that is paired with some rather slick looking and useful software.

The RT1900ac supports the latest consumer grade networking tech including 802.11ac MU-MIMO (beam forming to up to six devices), 802.11n 256-QAM, and wired Gigabit Ethernet. The 5GHz band tops out at 1300 Mbps while the 2.4GHz “N” band tops out at 600 Mbps though note that a single device cannot use the combined “1900” Mbps bandwidth and even then inter-device links are limited to gigabit speeds or less.

Synology Router RT1900ac Wireless Router.jpg

The rear of the router hosts five Gigabit Ethernet ports (1 WAN, 4 LAN) and three physical antennas which means a max of 3x3 MIMO to wireless devices. The left side of the router hosts a WPS (wireless protected setup) button and a physical Wi-Fi on/off switch while the right side of the router features a single USB 3.0 port and a SD card reader. 

Internally, the router is powered by a dual core processor running at 1 GHz paired with 256 MB of DDR3 memory. Synology rates the router at a maximum of 70 connected devices with as many as 40 concurrently transmitting data.

The operating system is called the Synology Router Manager and it can be accessed via a web interface or a mobile app called DS Router for Android and iOS.

Users are able to access the router using a GUI interface that is reminiscent of other Synology software. It supports parental controls (website blocking, scheduling, ect), application layer quality of service (QoS) on a per-device level, traffic management and bandwidth monitoring (per device as well as total bandwidth used). Users are able to initially setup the router using a web interface or the mobile app to guide them through setup.

The USB port (and SDXC card slot) can be used to share files and stream media to other devices. They can also be used to share a printer over the network or enable a mobile hotspot using a cellular modem dongle.

Interestingly, users can add additional software to their router from Synology. Optional applications from Synology’s Package Center allow using the router as a VPN, torrent box, RADIUS authentication server, DNS server, file share, and media server. Being able to extend the functionality of the router is nice to see and should be popular with enthusiasts though it does raise some security concerns.

This new router will be on display at CES 2016 and will be available in the US early next year for $150.

I’m interested to see the reviews on this as it certainly looks nice and the software looks much better than most!

Source: Synology

ASUS Zen AiO Pro All-in-One Desktop Features 4K IPS and Intel Skylake

Subject: Systems | November 13, 2015 - 10:25 PM |
Tagged: Zen AiO Pro, UHD, its display, Intel RealSense, desktop computer, Core i7-6700T, asus, all-in-one, AIO, 4k

ASUS has announced their newest all-in-one desktop PC, the Zen AiO Pro, featuring a 24-inch 4K IPS display and 6th-gen Intel Skylake processors.


"The Zen AiO Pro is a masterpiece of craftsmanship and design, with a slim unibody shell and integral stand forged from aluminum. The sophisticated appearance is enhanced by a layer of edge-to-edge glass covering the display, while the rear cover has a brushed-metal finish that complements the spun-metal concentric circles on the front fascia. A vision of elegance, the Zen AiO Pro’s exterior is anodized a stylish yet subtle Icicle Gold color that adds a touch of beauty to any space."

Beyond the (very gold) industrial design this PC features some pretty impressive specs depending on how you choose to configure it. The 23.8" IPS screen is available both 1920x1080 and a multi-touch 4K (UHD) 3840x2160 as well. CPU options include the Intel Core i7-6700T, a 4 core/8 thread part, and the AiO Pro features discrete graphics up to an NVIDIA GeForce GTX 960M. The inclusion of an Intel RealSense camera allows features like facial recognition, with plenty of rear I/O connectivity that includes USB 3.1 Type-C.


Zen AiO Pro Specifications:

  • Display: 23.8in IPS 4K/UHD 3840×2160 with 10-point capacitive multi-touch; 23.8in IPS Full HD 1920x1080
  • Processor: Intel Core i5-6400T; Intel Core i7-6700T
  • Graphics: NVIDIA GTX 950M, 1GB GDDR5; NVIDIA GTX 960M, 2GB GDDR5
  • Memory: 8GB or 16GB dual-channel DDR4 at 2133MHz
  • Storage options: 512GB PCIe SSD + 1TB HDD; 1TB SSHD; 1TB HDD
  • Wireless: 802.11ac + Bluetooth 4 (M.2, 2T2R), supports Intel WiDi
  • Ethernet: 10/100/1000Mbit/s
  • Cameras: Intel RealSense camera, 1MP 720P webcam
  • Audio: 8W Stereo Speakers
  • I/O ports: 1x USB 3.1 (Type-C); 4x USB 3.0; 1x USB 2.0; 1x microphone; 1x headphone; SD card slot; 2x HDMI; LAN
  • Power Supply: 180W
  • Operating System: Windows 10

The Zen AiO Pro starts at $999 (which includes a matching wireless keyboard and mouse) and is available now, with additional configurations to follow.

Source: ASUS

Report: Intel Broadwell-E Flagship i7-6950X a 10 Core, 20 Thread CPU

Subject: Processors | November 13, 2015 - 06:40 PM |
Tagged: X99, processor, LGA2011-v3, Intel, i7-6950X, HEDT, Haswell-E, cpu, Broadwell-E

Intel's high-end desktop (HEDT) processor line will reportedly be moving from Haswell-E to Broadwell-E soon, and with the move Intel will offer their highest consumer core count to date, according to a post at XFastest which WCCFtech reported on yesterday.


Image credit: VR-Zone

While it had been thought that Broadwell-E would feature the same core counts as Haswell-E (as seen on the leaked slide above), according to the report the upcoming flagship Core i7-6950X will be a massive 10 core, 20 thread part built using Intel's 14 nm process. Broadwell-E is expected to provide an upgrade to those running on Intel's current enthusiast X99 platform before Skylake-E arrives with an all-new chipset.

WCCFtech offered this chart in their report, outlining the differences between the HEDT generations (and providing a glimpse of the future Skylake-E variant):


Intel HEDT generations compared (Credit: WCCFtech)

It isn't all that surprising that one of Intel's LGA2011-v3 processors would arrive on desktops with 10 cores as these are closely related to the Xeon server processors, and Haswell based Xeon CPUs are already available with up to 18 cores, though priced far beyond what even the extreme builder would probably find reasonable (not to mention being far less suited to a desktop build based on motherboard compatibility). The projected $999 price tag for the Extreme Edition part with 10 cores would mark not only the first time an Intel desktop processor reached the core-count milestone, but it would also mark the lowest price to attain one of the company's 10-core parts to date (Xeon or otherwise).

Putting the R9 Nano under the microscope

Subject: Graphics Cards | November 13, 2015 - 03:30 PM |
Tagged: radeon, r9 nano, amd

We are not the only ones investigating usage scenarios for AMD's tiny R9 Nano, [H]ard|OCP has also recently looked at this card to determine if or when there is a good reason to pay the extra price for this tiny GPU.  This particular review focuses on performance against a similarly sized Gigabyte GTX 970 in a Cooler Master Elite 110, there will be a follow up in which the cards will run inside a Corsair Obsidian Series 250D case.  At 1080p the cards performed at very similar levels with the significantly more expensive Nano holding a small lead while at 1440p the R9 Nano truly shines.  This card is certainly not for everyone and both the FuryX and GTX 980 Ti offer much better performance at a simliar price point but neither of them will fit inside the case of someone determined to build a tiny gaming machine.


"This evaluation will compare the new retail purchased Radeon R9 Nano with a GIGABYTE GeForce GTX 970 N970-IX-OC small form factor video card in a mini-ITX Cooler Master Elite 110 Intel Skylake system build. We will find out if the higher priced Nano is worth the money for a 1440p and 1080p gameplay experience in a tiny footprint. "

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

This wireless Razer Mamba goes over 9000

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2015 - 01:45 PM |
Tagged: input, razer, Mamba Wireless Chroma, Mamba, wireless mouse

The Razer Mamba Chroma wireless gaming mouse features a sensor which can be set from 100DPI up to an almost ridiculous 16000DPI for those lucky few who can operate at such sensitivity.  They also included an interesting feature for your two main mouse buttons, screws on the bottom that allow you to adjust the clicking force needed from 45g and to 95g.  When Madshrimps delved into the software it was quite obvious Razer spent a lot of time thinking about how people would want to customize their mouse and tossed in a large selection of adjustable traits.  The mouse performed admirably and the wireless connection did not have any effect on the response of the mouse, though at $150 it does come with a premium price tag.


"The new Mamba version has been also included with the Chroma series so an insane number of configuration possibilities are available for its LED lighting system; the charging dock is not left alone, itself having LED lights under it for a nice effect when it sits on the table. Razer has included with the latest Mamba and Mamba TE versions a 16000DPI 5G laser sensor which is very accurate and can be configured with a polling rate up to 1000Hz."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: MadShrimps

Pyrite and quantum dots in your next battery?

Subject: General Tech | November 13, 2015 - 12:55 PM |
Tagged: battery, quantum dots, iron pyrite

Earlier this month we saw researchers seeing success by mixing air into lithium ion based batteries and today we hear of a different experiment aimed at increasing battery life.  As was discussed in the previous article the inevitable formation of crystals inside the battery is what prevents a battery from fully recharging and eventually being unable to hold any charge whatsoever.  Researchers have experimented with adding millions of iron pyrite quantum dots of varying sizes to lithium and sodium ion batteries and found they can make cells which charge more quickly than standard cells and survive more recharging cycles.  There is still a lot of work to be done, if you are interested in reading up on the research you can follow the links from Slashdot.


"The problem is that when the size of the crystals drop below a certain size they begin to react chemically with the electrolytes which prevents them from recharging. Now, however, a team of engineers from Vanderbilt University report in an article published in the journal ACS Nano that they can overcome this problem by making the nanocrystals out of iron pyrite, commonly known as fool's gold."

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Source: Slashdot