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Everything old is new again on the Internet o' Thangs

Subject: General Tech | July 7, 2014 - 02:34 PM |
Tagged: internet of things, MIPS, prpl, linaro

Imagination Technologies is reinvigorating their MIPS architecture by collaborating with Oracle and Qualcomm on MIPS-focused Java and OpenWRT Linux as well as continuing older partnerships with Ingenic and Ineda Systems.  MIPS has been a large player in low power WiFi enabled SoC's for quite a while with three billion MIPS-based products shipped in set-top boxes, mobile phones and wearable tech but have seen ARM take the lead and continue to garner more market share along with Intel's Quark.  These new partnerships may help MIPS based devices become more popular as some of the projects being developed are quite interesting, for instance Linux.com mentions the Dhanush Wearable Processing Unit which will run Linux and is aiming for a battery life of 30 days.

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"Imagination Technologies has launched a campaign to turn the 30-year-old MIPS architecture into an Internet of Things platform.

The IP designer's recent moves include the establishment of a Linaro-like "Prpl" industry group for MIPS, as well as collaborations with Oracle and Qualcomm on MIPS-focused Java and OpenWRT Linux development, respectively."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Linux.com

Samsung's new flash stands above the competition

Subject: Storage | July 7, 2014 - 03:58 PM |
Tagged: vertical, V-NAND, ssd, sata, Samsung, 850 PRO, 3d

As you saw in Al's review, the Samsung 850 drive is more than just a small bump in model number and performance, it is the stellar introduction to 3D NAND.  The Tech Report is likely having nightmares from the drives reported longevity which is expected to be up to 10 times the cycles of current drives and means an update to their long running endurance test could see them testing into the 2020's.  While they haven't yet added the 850 to that particular test they did post a review which starts out with a comprehensive look at the history of Flash technology and why 3D NAND is faster and more resilient than previous types; read on to get  a better understanding of the fastest consumer SATA drive on the market.

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"Most flash memory is limited to a single layer, but the V-NAND chips in Samsung's new 850 Pro SSD stack 32 layers on top of each other. This is next-level stuff, literally, and it's supposed to make the 850 Pro the fastest SATA drive around. We investigate."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Breaking News: League of Legends Is Hard. "Intro Bots" Soon.

Subject: General Tech | July 7, 2014 - 05:13 PM |
Tagged: riot games, moba, lol, free to play

MOBAs are known to be intricate, unforgiving PC games. League of Legends is one of the most popular at the moment (#1 PC game in terms of hours played for May 2014 according to Raptr). It is free to install and play, with small purchases to unlock more content ("microtransaction"). The free-to-play business model is quite interesting, albeit polarizing, because your commitment starts when your users installs your title, not ends. This often leads to one of two outcomes: abusers of human psychology or constantly developed, great games that strive to never get boring.

Now you can see why it is polarizing (or just read our impending comments).

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The business model does permit games that are deep in gameplay mechanics, however, if it keeps a core user base playing (and buying additional content) forever. Unfortunately, this also makes it difficult for new players to join -- especially when it is competitive and multiplayer.

Riot Games noted that they were uncomfortable with how many of their players lose "Battle Training", which is supposed to be a tutorial. Some even prove to have significant skill later on. They interpret this as the problem being how they educate new players. There is high complexity that is fair, and then there is just bad user experience.

"Intro Bots" is designed to be a mode which adjusts its difficulty to match the player currently, and as they progress. Hopefully it works. Obviously that is the limiting factor. It does seem to be designed reasonably. It teaches with repetition and in realistic scenarios.

Intro Bots is coming soon, after a brief stop in public beta. Ironically, the public beta realm was refered to as "PBE"... in a press release for a feature intended to be easier for new players. You know, the people who might not know the game's vocabulary. Just saying.

Source: Riot Games

The ASRock Fatal1ty Z97 Killer should not be judged by looks alone

Subject: Motherboards | July 7, 2014 - 07:07 PM |
Tagged: asrock, Fatal1ty Z97 Killer, budget

The ASRock Fatal1ty Z97 Killer can be yours for $135, much less than many previous motherboards bearing that famous name and [H]ard|OCP has a good idea why after reviewing the board.  The build quality of the board is rather cheap, as in the PCB is "as straight as undercooked bacon and feels more prone to breakage than the crispiest strips of bacon" and there was also mention of blood spilled.  However you should not judge the board by its cover as [H] soon found out, 8 phase power and sold caps provided a solid performance experience with no problems installing the OS or during their benchmarking process.  Their i7-4770K hit 4.7GHz with almost no effort whatsoever and can be coaxed higher if you have the time and skill.  This mix of low price, cheap build and stellar performance for a budget board earned this Killer a Gold Award and a place on the short list for economical enthusiasts.

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"The ASRock Fatal1ty Z97 Killer offers very little frills and boasts tons of performance at a very low cost. ASRock with us has been hit and miss in the past in terms of reviews. This $125 has all the features though that are needed to get you overclocking though. We put the ASRock Z97 Killer Fatal1ty to the test."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Release the all new Kraken X61

Subject: Cases and Cooling | July 11, 2014 - 05:55 PM |
Tagged: Kraken X61, nzxt, AIO, water cooling

NZXT's new Kraken X61 has a new trick up its sleeving, a variable speed pump for those who want as quiet a cooler as possible. [H]ard|OCP found that the design was so efficient and quiet that they really didn't need that feature but for those with sensitive ears it might be a perfect solution.  The performance was on par with many of the other AIO coolers they have tested however the price was higher at ~$140 which may be a deal breaker for some.  The other possible barrier for potential purchasers is the lack of documentation for both the physical installation and the software; experienced users will not be daunted by this but those who are not comfortable with muddling around in advanced settings and mounting coolers may want to print out the online docs before attempting to use the X61.

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"NZXT is known to many enthusiasts for its computer cases but not so much for its Kraken series of CPU closed loop liquid coolers. After a year of design NZXT has introduced its new Kraken X61. Its claim to fame is that it is the "world's first variable speed liquid cooler." Let's see what this variable RPM pump does for the new Kraken."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

 

Source: [H]ard|OCP