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Need an extreme cooling fan?

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 29, 2014 - 12:48 PM |
Tagged: noctua, water

The colours of the Noctua Industrial PPC family of fans are familiar but these 8 fans have some serious tricks up their sleeves.  While most fans focus on the amount of air they can move and how quietly they can manage that feat these fans are also rated on how harsh the conditions can be while they can maintain full functionality.  For instance the IP67 fans will operate perfectly even when submerged in water to a depth of 1m and provide complete protection against dust if used in air.  While it is unlikely your computer will function when submerged there are builds which could take advantage of the ability to move water around.  Generally these fans are intended for use cooling systems that reside in industrial plants and other harsh conditions but it is nice to know you can pick up fans specifically designed to operate in very dusty or wet environments.  Check out the review at Modders Inc if the idea of having a ruggedized cooling system appeals to you.

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"The Noctua Industrial PPC line packaging is similarly Spartan like the new Noctua Redux line, packed without extras such as adapters, splitters and alternate mounting options but comes with a 4-piece screw mounting kit."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING

Source: Modders Inc

The Internet of Thing is a confusing place for manufacturers right now

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2014 - 10:11 AM |
Tagged: arm, internet of things, Si106x, 108x, Silicon Labs, Intel, quark

While the Internet of Things is growing at an incredible pace the chip manufacturers which are competing for this new market segment are running into problems when trying to design chips to add to appliances.  There is a balance which needs to be found between processing power and energy savings, the goal is to design very inexpensive chips which can run on  microWatts of power but still be incorporate networked communication and sensors.  The new Cortex-M7 is a 32-bit processor which is directly competing with 8 and 16 bit microcontrollers which provide far less features but also consume far less power.  Does a smart light bulb really need to have a 32bit chip in it or will a lower cost MCU provide everything that is needed for the light to function?  Intel's Quark is in a similar position, the processing power it is capable of could be a huge overkill compared to what the IoT product actually needs.  The Register has made a good observation in this article, perhaps the Cortex M0 paired with an M4 or M7 when the application requires the extra horsepower is a good way for ARM to go in.  Meanwhile, Qualcomm's Snapdragon 600 has been adopted to run an OS to control robots so don't think this market is going to get any less confusing in the near future.

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"The Internet of Things (IoT) is growing an estimated five times more quickly than the overall embedded processing market, so it's no wonder chip suppliers are flocking to fit out connected cars, home gateways, wearables and streetlights as quickly as they can."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Check out results of The Tech Report's hardware survey

Subject: General Tech, Systems | September 29, 2014 - 10:21 AM |
Tagged: survey, components

The Tech Report have compiled the data from their survey of readers machines and the data is now posted in this article.  You can see how your build compares to the major trends that they observed, from the number and type of monitors that you use to the amount of RAM you have installed.  The most interesting page covers the odd facts which were revealed such as the overwhelming predominance of ATX boards and cases that are being used despite the fact that 75% of respondents having only a single card installed in their systems.  It is also interesting to note a mere 10% of those responding use more than one GPU.  Check out the findings here.

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"Typical PC enthusiasts may spend more on their PCs than you might think—and by the looks of it, their taste for high-end hardware isn't just limited to core components. Those are two of the main takeaways from the TR Hardware Survey 2014, in which we invited readers to answer 26 questions about their PCs. Around 4,000 of you participated over a period of about a week and a half, and the results paint an enlightening picture of current trends in the hobbyist PC realm. "

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Subject: Storage
Manufacturer: Micron

Introduction and Specifications

Today Micron lifted the review embargo on their new M600 SSD lineup. We covered their press launch a couple of weeks ago, but as a recap, the headline new feature is the new Dynamic Write Acceleration feature. As this is a new (and untested) feature that completely changes the way an SSD must be tested, we will be diving deep on this one later in this article. For the moment, let's dispose with the formalities.

Here are the samples we received for testing:

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It's worth noting that since all M600 models use 16nm 128Gbit dies, packaging is expected to have a negligible impact on performance. This means the 256GB MSATA sample should perform equally to its 2.5" SATA counterpart. The same goes for comparisons against M.2 form factor units. More detail is present in the specs below:

Specifications:

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Highlights from the above specs are the increased write speeds (no doubt thanks to Dynamic Write Acceleration) and improved endurance figures. For reference, the prior gen Micron models were rated at 72TB (mostly regardless of capacity), so seeing figures upwards of 400TB indicates Micron's confidence in their 16nm process.

Packaging:

Sorry to disappoint here, but the M600 is an OEM targeted drive, meaning its 'packaging' will likely be the computer it comes installed in. If you manage to find it through a reseller, it will likely come in OEM-style brown/white box packaging.

We have been evaluating these samples for just under a week and have logged *many* hours on them, so let's get to it!

Continue reading our review of the Micron M600 SSDs!!

MSI KingBox MS-9A66 for Their Industrious... Fans

Subject: General Tech, Systems | September 26, 2014 - 11:16 PM |
Tagged: msi, kingbox, ms-9a66, fanless, industry, ruggedized

This is not usually a category of computer that we report on, but MSI has just released a fanless, embedded desktop for industrial applications. Silent PCs seem to be talked about more and more frequently, and I am not sure how much of it is industry trends (as opposed to me just paying more attention). Their focus on this design is performance while remaining rugged and, as mentioned a few times, fanless.

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Note that it supports CPUs with a maximum of 35W TDP. This leaves room for MSI to include up to a Core i7-4785T in the device, but we do not know if this is actually offered. It has four expansion bays, one PCIe x16 and three regular PCI slots. It does not have an ISA slot, though. I am sure this will be disappointing to some enterprises, and Josh. He probably still has a graphics card for it. You might think I would be joking. I am, but sadly I also am not.

For power, the device can accept anywhere from 9 to 36V DC. Basically, it seems to be based on laptop components with expansion slots for add-in boards. You can also purchase a fan "module" for it if, for one reason or another, it is still the best PC for the job even if it wasn't fanless.

Pricing and specific availability are not provided, but it is apparently released.

Source: MSI
Manufacturer: Seasonic

Introduction and Features

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Today we have a double header for your reading enjoyment. Not one, but two Platinum Series power supplies from Seasonic. The two latest additions to Seasonic’s flagship product line are the Platinum 1050W and Platinum 1200W PSUs. The power supplies feature tight voltage regulation (±1~2%), quiet operation (fanless mode), and high efficiency (80Plus Platinum certified). Both PSUs are fully modular and come backed by a 7-year warranty.

Seasonic is a well known and highly respected OEM that produces some of the best PC power supplies on the market today. In addition to supplying power supplies to many big-name companies who re-brand the units with their own name, Seasonic also sells a full line of power supplies under the Seasonic name. Both new power supplies feature an improved Hybrid Fan control circuit and upgraded copper conduction bars on the main PCB, which together help increase efficiency and performance.

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Seasonic Platinum 1050W & 1200W Special Features

Ultra Tight Voltage Regulation Improved load voltage regulation keeps the voltage fluctuations on the 12V output within +2% and -0% (no negative tolerance), and on the 3.3V and 5V outputs between +1% and -1%, which (under 80 Plus load conditions) results in smooth and stable operation.

Seasonic Hybrid Silent Fan Control The industry first, advanced three-phased thermal control balances between silence and cooling. The Hybrid Silent Fan Control provides three operational stages: Fanless, Silent and Cooling Mode.  In addition, a selector switch is provided to allow for manual selection between the Seasonic S2FC (fan control without Fanless Mode) or S3FC (fan control including Fanless Mode).

Reduced Cooling Fan Hysteresis is achieved by a new fan control IC, which optimizes how frequently the fan switches on and off. At 25°C ambient temperature the fan turns on when the load rises above 30% (±5%) and turns off when the load drops below 20% % (±5%). Due to this lag in response the fan switches on and off less frequently, which reduces power loss in Fanless and Silent Mode.

Dual Copper Conduction Bars on the power supply PCB help reduce impedance and minimize voltage drop, which further improves efficiency and performance.

80Plus Platinum The Platinum 1050W & 1200W power supplies are certified in accordance to the 80PLUS organization's Platinum standards, offering performance and energy savings with up to ≥92% efficiency and a true power factor of greater than 0.9 PF.

Full Modular Design (DC to DC) The Seasonic Platinum Series power supplies feature an integrated DC connector panel with onboard VRM (Voltage Regulator Module) that enables not only near perfect DC-to-DC conversion with reduction of current loss/impedance and increase of efficiency but also a fully modular DC cabling that enables maximum flexibility of integration and forward compatibility.

Seasonic Platinum Series 1050W & 1200W PSU Key Features:

•    80Plus Platinum certified super high efficiency
•    Ultra tight voltage regulation
•    Fully Modular Cable design with flat ribbon-style cables
•    Seasonic DC Connector Panel with integrated VRMs
•    DC to DC Converter design
•    Hybrid Silent Fan Control (3 modes of operation: Fanless, Silent and Cooling)
•    High-quality Sanyo Denki San Ace dual ball bearing fan with PWM
•    Ultra-tight voltage regulation (+2% and -0% +12V rail)
•    Dual copper conduction bars on PCB for improved efficiency and performance
•    Supports multi-GPU technologies
•    Conductive polymer aluminum solid capacitors
•    High reliability 105°C Japanese made electrolytic capacitors
•    ErP Lot 6 2013 compliant and Intel Haswell processor ready
•    High current Gold plated terminals with Easy Swap connectors
•    Active PFC (0.99 PF typical) with Universal AC input
•    7-Year manufacturer's warranty worldwide

Please continue reading our Seasonic Platinum 1050W & 1200W power supply review!

Linux loves Haswell-E

Subject: Processors | September 25, 2014 - 11:56 AM |
Tagged: linux, X99, core i7-5960x, Haswell-E

After the smoke from their previous attempt at testing the i7 5960X CPU Phoronix picked up a Gigabyte X99-UD4-CF and have now had a chance to test Haswell-E performance on Linux.  The new processor is compared to over a dozen others on machines running Ubuntu and really showed up the competition on benchmarks that took advantage of the 8 cores.  Single threaded applications that depended on a higher clock speed proved to be a weakness as the 4790K's higher frequency allowed it to outperform the new Haswell-E processor.  Check out the very impressive results of Phoronix's testing right here.

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"With the X99 burned-up motherboard problem of last week appearing to be behind us with no further issues when using a completely different X99 motherboard, here's the first extensive look at the Core i7 5960X Haswell-E processor running on Ubuntu Linux."

Here are some more Processor articles from around the web:

Processors

Source: Phoronix

S.W.A.P. Is Free and not a Regular First Person Shooter

Subject: General Tech | September 25, 2014 - 11:46 PM |
Tagged: free games, swap, arena shooter, pc gaming

Subterfuge Weapons Assessment Program, an obvious backronym for S.W.A.P., takes the first person shooter genre and removes the whole "damage" mechanic. Basically, shooting an opponent will have your character "exchange bodies". The point is apparently to prevent the enemy from delivering a payload to your base or put them into situations where they will kill themselves once they are at your position.

While I have yet to play the game, it is free. No micro-transactions, DLC, or subscriptions. They are using this project to gauge interest for a full, Unreal Engine release. It has an interesting art style, reminiscent of Unreal Tournament (1999) or the original Tribes. It could be worth a download, especially if you like old-fashioned arena shooters and unusual game mechanics.

Those are two genres which do not get mixed a lot...

Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: EVGA

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of EVGA

The X99 Classified motherboard is EVGA's premier product offering for their Intel X99 chipset motherboard line. The board supports the Intel LGA2011-3 based processors along with DDR4 memory in a quad channel configuration. The X99 Classified board is a synthesis product for EVGA with all of the innovations from previous boards integrated for a superior offering. A premium product like this comes at a premium price point with an MSRP of $399.99.

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Courtesy of EVGA

The X99 Classified has a 10 phase digital power system and high performance solid state capacitors integrated to power the CPU under any circumstances thrown its way. EVGA designed the following features into the X99 Classified: 10 SATA 3 ports; two M.2 PCIe x4 capable ports; dual Intel Gigabit NICs - an Intel I217 and an Intel I210; five PCI-Express x16 slots; one PCI-Express x4 slot; 2-digit diagnostic LED display; on-board power, reset, and dual CMOS clear buttons; triple BIOS selector and Turbo switches; PCIe disable switch jumper block; integrated Probe IT voltage measurement system; GPU Link headers and cables; and USB 2.0 and 3.0 port support.

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Courtesy of EVGA

Technical Specifications (taken from the EVGA website)

Microprocessor support Intel Socket 2011-3 Processor
PCH Intel X99 chipset
System Memory support Supports Quad channel DDR4 up to 3000MHz+ (OC).
Supports up to 128GB of DDR4 memory.
USB 2.0 Ports 8 x from Intel X99 PCH – 6x external, 2x internal
Supports hot plug
Supports wake-up from S1 and S3 mode
Supports USB 2.0 protocol up to a 480 Mbps transmission rate
USB 3.0 Ports 6 x from Intel X99 PCH – 4x external, 2x internal
Supports transfer speeds up to 5Gbps
Backwards compatible USB 2.0 and USB 1.1 support
SATA Ports Intel X99 PCH Controller
6 x SATA 3/6G (600 MB/s) data transfer rate
- Support for RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, AND RAID 10
- Supports hot plug
4 x SATA3/6G AHCI Only
Onboard LAN 1 x Intel i217 Gigabit Ethernet PHY
1 x Intel i210 Gigabit Ethernet MAC
Supports 10/100/1000 Mb/sec Ethernet
Audio Creative Core 3D (CA0132) Controller
6 Channel HD Audio
PCI-E Slots 5 x PCI-E x14 Mechanical Slots
- Arrangement - 1 x16, 2 x 16, 3 x8, 4 x8*
1 x PCI-E x4 Slot

*PCI-E lane distribution listed REQUIRES 40 lane CPU

Operating Systems Supports Windows 8 / 7
Size EATX form factor
12 inches x 10.375 inches (305x264mm)

Continue reading our review of the EVGA X99 Classified motherboard!

Microsoft Introduces Windows 10 to the Enterprise

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2014 - 08:46 PM |
Tagged: microsoft, windows, windows 10, windows 9, Windows 7, Windows 8.1, threshold

The Windows event for the enterprise, which took place today in San Francisco, revealed the name of the upcoming OS. It is not Windows 9, or One Windows, or just Windows. It will be Windows 10. Other than the name, there is not really any new information from a feature or announcement standpoint (except the Command Prompt refresh that I actually will give a brief mention later). My interest comes from their mindset with this new OS -- what they are changing and what they seem to be sticking with.

If you would like Microsoft's commentary before reading mine, the keynote is embed above.

Okay, so one thing that was shown is "Continuum". If you have not seen its prototype at the end of the above video, it is currently a small notification that appears when a keyboard and mouse is attached (or detached). If a user accepts, this will flip the user interface between tablet and desktop experiences. Joe Belfiore was clear that the video clip was not yet in code, but represents their vision. In practice, it will have options for whether to ask the user or to automatically do some chosen behavior.

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In a way, you could argue that it was necessary to go through Windows 8.x to get to this point. From the demonstrations, the interface looks sensible and a landing point for users on both Windows 7 and Windows 8 paths. That said, I was fine with the original Windows 8 interface, barring a few glitches, like disappearing icons and snapping sidebars on PCs with multiple monitors. I always considered the "modern" Windows interface to be... acceptable.

It was the Windows Store certification that kept me from upgrading, and Microsoft's current stance is confusing at the very least. Today's announcement included the quote, "Organizations will also be able to create a customized store, curating store experiences that can include their choice of Store apps alongside company-owned apps into a separate employee store experience." Similar discussion was brought up and immediately glossed over during the keynote.

Who does that even apply to? Would a hobbyist developer be able to set up a repository for friends and family? Or is this relegated to businesses, leaving consumers to accept nothing more than what Microsoft allows? The concern is that I do not want Microsoft (or anyone) telling me what I can and cannot create and install on my devices. Once you build censorship, the crazies will come. They usually do.

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But onto more important things: Command Prompt had a major UX overhaul. Joe Belfiore admitted that it was mostly because most important changes were already leaked and reported on, and they wanted to surprise us with something. They sure did. You can now use typical keyboard shortcuts, shift to select, ctrl+c and ctrl+v to copy/paste, and so forth. The even allow a transparency option, which is common in other OSes to make its presence less jarring. Rather than covering over what you're doing, it makes it feel more like it overlays on top of it, especially for quick commands. At least, that is my opinion.

Tomorrow, October 1st, Microsoft will launch their "Windows Inside Program". This will give a very early glimpse at the OS for "most enthusiastic Windows fans" who are "comfortable running pre-release software that will be of variable quality". They "plan to share all the features (they) are experimenting with". They seem to actually want user feedback, a sharp contrast from their Windows 8 technical preview. My eye will on relaxing certification requirements, obviously.

Source: Microsoft

Intel RealSense SDK Beta Available, Camera Pre-Order

Subject: General Tech | September 29, 2014 - 12:41 AM |
Tagged: Realsense 3D, realsense, kinect, Intel

RealSense is Intel's 3D camera initiative for bringing face recognition, gesture control, speech input, and augmented reality to the PC. Its closest analogy would be Microsoft's Kinect for Windows. The technology has been presented at Intel keynotes for a while now, embodied in the "Intel Perceptual Computing SDK 2013" under its "Perceptual Computing" initiative.

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Since August 31st, that has been removed from their site and replaced with the Intel RealSense SDK. While the software is free, you will probably need compatible hardware to do anything useful. None is available yet, but the "Intel RealSense Developer Kit" hardware (not to be confused with the "Intel RealSense SDK", which is software) is available for reservation at Intel's website. The camera is manufactured by Creative Labs and will cost $99. They are also very clear that this is a developer tool, and forbid it from being used in "mission critical applications". Basically, don't trust your life on it, or the lives and health of any other(s) or anything.

The developer kit will be available for many regions: the US, Canada, much of Europe, Brazil, India, China, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, South Korea, New Zealand, Australia, Russia, Israel, and Singapore.

Source: Intel

EVGA PrecisionX 16 Now Available

Subject: General Tech, Graphics Cards | September 25, 2014 - 11:03 PM |
Tagged: steam, precisionx 16, precisionx, overclocking, nvidia, evga

If you were looking to download EVGA Precision X recently, you were likely disappointed. For a few months now, the software was unavailable because of a disagreement between the add-in board (AIB) partner and Guru3D (and the RivaTuner community). EVGA maintains that it was a completely original work, and references to RivaTuner are a documentation error. As a result, they pulled the tool just a few days after launching X 15.

... and they have recently relaunched with PrecisionX 16.

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This new version, besides probably cleaning up all of the existing issues mentioned above, adds support for the new GeForce GTX 900-series cards, a new interface, an "OSD" for inside applications, and Steam Achievements (??). You can get a permanent badge on your Steam account for breaking 1200 MHz on your GPU, taking a screenshot, or restoring settings to default. I expect that latter badge is one of shame, like the Purple Heart from Battlefield, that is not actually a bad thing and says nothing less of your overclocking skills by pressing it. Seriously, save yourself some headache and just press default if things just do not seem right.

PrecisionX 16 is free, available now, and doesn't require an EVGA card (just a site sign-up).

Source: EVGA

Europeans: Atlast! Has Haswell-based Fanless NUCs

Subject: General Tech, Systems | September 29, 2014 - 03:41 PM |
Tagged: fanless, nuc, haswell

The Akasa Newton X is a fanless case for the NUC form factor that was announced in May and released a couple of months ago. Now, we are beginning to see system builders (albeit in Europe) integrate it in some higher-end devices. This one, from Atlast! Solutions, is built around the Intel Core i5-4250U, up to 1.5TB of SSD storage (512GB Crucial M550 mSATA + 1TB 840 EVO SATA), and up to 16GB of RAM. It can also be configured with up to two-antenna Wireless AC.

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The Core i5-4250U is a dual-core (four threads) processor that is rated for 15W TDP. Its on-chip GPU is the Intel HD Graphics 5000 with a peak, theoretical compute throughput of 704 GFLOPS. This makes it a little under three-times the graphics performance of an Xbox 360. In terms of PC games, you are looking at Battlefield 4 or Titanfall on low at 1024x768 (or basically whatever your home server can do if used as a stream-to target).

Prices currently start at £449.00 for 4GB of RAM and 60GB of mSATA SSD, including VAT.

Thanks to FanlessTech for covering this story.

Oculus Rift Crescent Bay, hinting at what the consumer model will look like

Subject: General Tech | September 24, 2014 - 10:51 AM |
Tagged: Oculus, oculus connect, crescent bay, gaming

If you haven't had a chance to listen to it, Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN has linked to the Keynote Panel of John Carmack, Palmer Luckey and several others presented during the Oculus Connect event.  They also give you a few insights into their experience with the new Crescent Bay prototype which features “new display technology, 360° head tracking, expanded positional tracking volume, dramatically improved weight and ergonomics, and high-quality integrated audio.”  They were not the only ones who were playing with the new device, Polygon has both a video and a write up on their chance to use the new model, which is likely to be the last one revealed before the final consumer release.  Unfortunately there is not yet a date as to when that will happen so for now try to make friends with someone who has a Dev Kit 2 model.

The Fragging Frogs are still working towards the next major gamign event but that doesn't mean you can't play with them, there are still official pick up games every Monday, Wednesday and Friday and you can find members online almost all the time.

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"The new kit was available to play at Oculus Connect, with a new set of demos designed to show off the increased sense of “presence” provided by the device. If that word sounds familiar, that’s because that’s what Valve called it when they worked on their own VR prototype. Michael Abrash, now at Oculus, headed that team at Valve."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Intel Expands x86 SoC Program to Tsinghua Unigroup

Subject: General Tech, Processors, Mobile | September 27, 2014 - 11:38 AM |
Tagged: Intel, spreadtrum, rda, Rockchip, SoC

A few months ago, Intel partnered with Rockchip to develop low-cost SoCs for Android. The companies would work together on a design that could be fabricated at TSMC. This time Intel is partnering with Tsinghua Unigroup Ltd. and, unlike Rockchip, also investing in them. The deal will be up to $1.5 billion USD in exchange for a 20% share (approximately) of a division of Tsinghua.

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Image Credit: Wikipedia

Intel is hoping to use this partnership to develop mobile SoCs, for smart (and "feature") phones, tablets, and other devices, and get significant presence in the Chinese mobile market. Tsinghua acquired Spreadtrum Communications and RDA Microelectronics within the last two years. The "holding group" that owns these division is apparently the part of Tsinghua which Intel is investing in, specifically.

Spreadtrum will produce SoCs based on Intel's "Intel Architecture". This sounds like they are referring to the 32-bit IA-32, which means that Spreadtrum would be developing 32-bit SoCs, but it is possible that they could be talking about Intel 64. These products are expected for 2H'15.

Source: Intel

Look at all the pretty lights! The Corsair K70 RGB

Subject: General Tech | September 30, 2014 - 11:00 AM |
Tagged: K70 RGB, input, corsair, Cherry MX RGB red

There is a new type of Cherry MX switches on the market and they are what allow the Corsair K70 RGB to stand out in a light filled room; Cherry MX RGB switches feel like the original switches but with the clear plastic domes they have clear housings.  Thanks to the Corsair Utility Engine software which comes with the keyboard you can choose from 16.8 million colours to enhance the look of your keyboard, or create macros to have colours change as you are using it.  The Tech Report had great success in programming the keyboard considering that the manual is 142 pages long so expect a bit of a steep learning curve when you first start out playing with this keyboard.  You can find their review as well as a video showing off some of their colour schemes right here.

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"Corsair Gaming's K70 RGB keyboard has been hotly anticipated since its debut at CES earlier this year. Does it live up to the hype? We put the keyboard and its accompanying software to the test to find out"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Son of Voyager, Corsair's second wireless HDD enclosure

Subject: Storage | September 25, 2014 - 03:36 PM |
Tagged: corsair, Voyager Air 2, wireless hdd

The Corsair Voyager Air 2 is the second iteration of wireless drive, this years model coming with a 1TB drive, a totally redesigned shell and a $20 drop in price.  Legit Reviews warns that while the price drop is appreciated it no longer comes with the charging kit which will cost you extra.  It supports USB 3.0 and 802.11 b/g/n transfers as well as Internet passthrough, keep in mind that WiFi is disabled once the USB plug is connected.  The overall speeds were in line with what was expected and the battery life is impressive for 720p streaming, though 1080p streaming drains it much more quickly.  See the Voyager in action right here.

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"Last year we took a look at Corsair’s first wireless hard drive, called Voyager Air, which was a very sleek and impressive unit that we really liked. Today, we’re going to take a look at the more recently revamped version, conveniently called Voyager Air 2. We’ll take a look and see what this drive all has to offer and if there is anything new brought to the table."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Gigabyte's Z97X G1 Gaming GT is a bit of a step backwards

Subject: General Tech | September 29, 2014 - 11:17 AM |
Tagged: gigabyte, Z97X G1 Gaming GT, z97

Calling the GIGABYTE G1 Gaming GT Z97 motherboard trimmed down is a bit of an exaggeration, all that was removed was Bluetooth, WiFi and and Creative's Sound Core3D codec.  It still features AMP-UP audio with swappable OP-AMPs, a E2200 KillerNIC, high quality caps, four PCIe 3.0 16x slots thanks to a PLEX chip as well as an impressive array of SATA and USB ports.  At $270 it will cost you a somewhat less than choosing a new Haswell-E system and the performance in most cases will be very comparable, especially if you desire high quality audio.  However not all was good once [H]ard|OCP started testing the board, while there were no insurmountable issues their overall experiences with setting up the board make this particular model difficult to recommend; read the reasons why in their full review.

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"GIGABYTE’s G1 Gaming GT looks to be a stripped version of the Z97X Gaming G1 WiFi-BK. Like other offerings in the G1 family the G1 Gaming GT is a premium part representing the pinnacle of what GIGABYTE design and innovation can and should offer. We have high expectations for the G1 Gaming GT."

Here are some more Motherboard articles from around the web:

Motherboards

Source: [H]ard|OCP

Plantronics updates their RIG Surround headset

Subject: General Tech | September 24, 2014 - 02:24 PM |
Tagged: audio, plantronics, RIG Surround

It feels like a while since Plantronics released a new headset into the currently crowded marketplace but the 2014 version of the Plantronics RIG Surround has some interesting changes from the previous model.  The RIG Surround mixer used to be a simple volume and balance control but has now been upgraded to what is essentially an external soundcard with extra functionality.  It is best used with a cellphone as the mixer can give you better sound from your cellphone as well as enabling you apply EQ profiles and answer your phone with a single button push.  When connected to a PC the lack of an analog passthrough means that the sound you hear will be dependant on the mixer and not the soundcard in the PC which can reduce the audio quality somewhat but you can bypass it and plug the RIG directly into your PC to enjoy the full capabilities of the headset.  The microphone is removable for when you do not need it which also helps portability.  Check out Legit Reviews opinion on the new version of the RIG right here.

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"We are very excited to be taking an early look at the upcoming Plantronics RIG Surround. It’s not only because Plantronics has a stellar reputation, but because we’ve had great firsthand experiences with their other gaming headsets. The Plantronics RIG Surround primarily consists of two components – a headset and an external sound card called the RIG mixer that also allows gamers to attach their smartphone and use the setup like a home call center."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Audio Corner

Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord Editor Video

Subject: General Tech | September 28, 2014 - 05:30 PM |
Tagged: mount & blade, taleworlds, mount & blade ii, bannerlord, pc gaming

The Mount & Blade franchise is enjoyed among a relatively small, dedicated group of fans. One leading reason for this uptake is the large base of third-party content from its modding community. One mod, Mount & Musket, led to the creation of a game studio, Flying Squirrel Entertainment, when the mod was picked up into an official expansion, Mount & Blade: Warband: Napoleonic Wars. Sometimes taxonomy can be proper but a little bit excessive.

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Developer, TaleWorlds, builds games atop their own, proprietary engine and designs it with modders in mind. They are currently in development of Mount & Blade II: Bannerlords, a prequel to Mount & Blade: Warband. In the video, below, they explain that every feature in the video is available for third-parties. This includes painting layers of materials and foliage, generating terrain by height-maps, and tessellation.

Hopefully they also add "connect to IP"...

While the game was first announced two years ago, it is still in a "when it's done" phase. The publisher is still unknown. Paradox Interactive was attached to the first three games, and Napoleonic Wars, but are not involved with Bannerlord, according to a Reddit AMA from last year. As popular as it is, at least for what it is, TaleWorlds could even be self-publishing to digital distribution platforms like Steam, Desura, GoG, and others, but that is just speculation.

Source: TaleWorlds