Flash player not detected. Click here to install flash.
« 1 2 3 4 5 »

A trio of mechanical keyboards from AiZO, the new MGK L80 lineup

Subject: General Tech | August 22, 2016 - 03:14 PM |
Tagged: AiZO, MGK L80, Kailh, gaming keyboard, input

The supply of mechanical keyboards continues to grow, once Cherry MX was the only supplier of switches and only a few companies sold the products.  Now we have choice in manufacturer as well as the switch type we want, beyond the choice of Red, Brown, Blue and so on.  AiZO chose to use Kailh switches in their MGK L80 lineup, your choice of click type and also included a wrist rest for those who desire such a thing.  Modders Inc tested out the three models on offer, they are a bit expensive but do offer a solid solution for your mechanical keyboard desires.

IMG_9339.jpg

"The MGK L80 series is the latest line of gaming keyboards manufactured by AZIO. Available in red, blue or RGB backlighting, the MGK L80 offers mechanical gaming comfort with a choice of either Kailh brown or blue switch mounted on an elegant brushed aluminum surface."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Modders Inc

More space than even Jimmy Stewart would need to satisfy his voyeurism

Subject: Storage | August 18, 2016 - 02:59 PM |
Tagged: skyhawk, Seagate, rear window, hitchcock, 10TB

Seagate designed the 10TB SkyHawk HDD for recording video surveillance by adding in firmware they refer to as ImagePerfect.  This is designed for handling 24/7 surveillance and extends the endurance life of the drive to 180TB a year, for the length of the three year warranty.  Constantly recording video means this drive will write far more often than most other usages scenarios and reads will be far less important.  eTeknix tried the drive out in their usual suite of benchmarks; being somewhat difficult to set up a test to verify the claimed support for up to 64HD recordings simultaneously.  If you are looking for durable storage at a reasonable price and might even consider needing more than eight drives of storage you should check the SkyHawk out.

Seagate_SkyHawk-Photo-top-angle.jpg

"I’ve recently had a look at the 10TB IronWolf NAS HDD from Seagate and today it is time to take a closer look at its brother, the brand new SkyHawk DVR and NVR hard disk drive with a massive 10TB capacity. Sure, you could use NAS optimized drives for simple video setups, but having a video and camera optimized surveillance disk does bring advantages. Especially when your recorded video is critical."

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

Source: eTeknix

What dwells in the heart of HoloLens? Now we all know!

Subject: General Tech | August 23, 2016 - 12:40 PM |
Tagged: hololens, microsoft, Tensilica, Cherry Trail, hot chips

Microsoft revealed information about the internals of the new holographic processor used in their Hololens at Hot Chips, the first peek we have had.  The new headset is another win for Tensilica as they provide the DSP and instruction extensions; previously we have seen them work with VIA to develop an SSD controller and with AMD for TrueAudio solutions.  Each of the 24 cores has a different task it is hardwired for, offering more efficient processing than software running on flexible hardware.

The processing power for your interface comes from a 14nm Cherry Trail processor with 1GB of DDR and yes, your apps will run on Windows 10.  For now the details are still sparse, there is still a lot to be revealed about Microsoft's answer to VR.  Drop by The Register for more slides and info.

hololens_large.jpg

"The secretive HPU is a custom-designed TSMC-fabricated 28nm coprocessor that has 24 Tensilica DSP cores. It has about 65 million logic gates, 8MB of SRAM, and a layer of 1GB of low-power DDR3 RAM on top, all in a 12mm-by-12mm BGA package. We understand it can perform a trillion calculations a second."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: The Register

Hey Ken, print me out a shroud! ASUS introduces 3D printed parts for their motherboards, GPUs and peripherals

Subject: General Tech | August 23, 2016 - 07:02 PM |
Tagged: asus, 3d printing

ASUS have just released FreeCAD and 3D source files for you to print out embellishments and useful add-ons for your ASUS motherboards, graphics cards and peripherals such as the ROG Spatha.  Below you can see a 3D-printed finger rest addition to the Spatha, just one of the possibilities this new program opens up.

Spatha edited.jpg

Certain motherboards such as the Z170 Pro Gaming/Aura sport mounting points specifically designed for 3D printed parts, or you can use empty M.2 mount points as the designs ASUS have made available use the same screws as you would use in an M.2 port. 

Z170 Pro Gaming Aura_protective armor.jpg

You could add a nameplate, an additional fan mount or even extra plastic shielding, in whatever colours you have available to print with.  ASUS chose to use FreeCAD to design the parts so that you do not necessarily need a 3D printer yourself, services such as ShapeWays can print the parts out for you.

1464872134493.jpg

If you have SLI or CrossFire bridges that need sprucing up, they have designed covers to snap over your existing parts as well as cable combs to keep your cables under control.  The current designs only scratch the surface of what you could create and add to your builds and you can bet ASUS will be adding more possibilities in the coming months.  You can just add a little something to make your machine unique or go all out with modifications, just check out the designs and see what grabs your attention.

SLI bridge cover edited.jpg

Source: ASUS

Serious mobile gaming power from ASUS, if you can afford it

Subject: Mobile | August 19, 2016 - 03:15 PM |
Tagged: asus, ROG, gtx 1070, G752VS OC Edition, pascal, gaming laptop

The mobile version of the GTX 1070, referred to here as the GTX 1070M even if NVIDIA doesn't, is a interesting part sporting 128 more cores than the desktop version albeit at a lower clock.  Hardware Canucks received the ASUS RoG G752VS OC Edition gaming laptop which uses the mobile GTX 1070, overclocked by 50MHz on the Core and by 150MHz on the 8GB of RAM, along with an i7-6820 running at 3.8GHz.  This particular model will set you back $3000US and offers very impressive performance on either it's 17.3" 1080p G-SYNC display or on an external display of your choice.  The difference in performance between the new GTX 1070(M) and the previous GTX 980M is marked, check out the full review to see just how much better this card is ... assuming the price tag doesn't immediately turn you off.

GTX1070-NOTEBOOK-10.jpg

"The inevitable has finally happened: NVIDIA's Pascal architecture has made its way into gaming notebooks....and it is spectacular. In this review we take a GTX 1070-totting laptop out for a spin. "

Here are some more Mobile articles from around the web:

More Mobile Articles

Intel's new SoC, the Joule

Subject: General Tech | August 18, 2016 - 02:20 PM |
Tagged: Intel, joule, iot, IDF 2016, SoC, 570x, 550x, Intel RealSense

Intel has announced the follow up to Edison and Curie, their current SoC device, called Joule.  They have moved away from the Quark processors they previously used to a current generation Atom.  The device is designed to compete against NVIDIA's Jetson as it is far more powerful than a Raspberry Pi and will be destined for different usage.  It will support Intel RealSense, perhaps appearing in the newly announced Project Alloy VR headset.  Drop by Hack a Day for more details on the two soon to be released models, the Joule 570x and 550x.

intel-joule-1-2x1-720x360.jpg

"The high-end board in the lineup features a quad-core Intel Atom running at 2.4 GHz, 4GB of LPDDR4 RAM, 16GB of eMMC, 802.11ac, Bluetooth 4.1, USB 3.1, CSI and DSI interfaces, and multiple GPIO, I2C, and UART interfaces."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

Gamescom 2016: Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord Video

Subject: General Tech | August 19, 2016 - 01:40 AM |
Tagged: mount & blade ii, taleworlds

Mount & Blade is a quite popular franchise in some circles. It is based around a fairly simple, but difficult to master combat system, which mixes melee, blocking, and ranged attacks. They are balanced by reload time (and sometimes accuracy) to make all methods viable. A 100 vs 100 battle, including cavalry and other special units, is quite unique. It is also a popular mod platform, although Warband's engine can be a little temperamental.

As such, there's quite a bit of interest for the upcoming Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord. The Siege game mode involves an attacking wave beating down a fortress, trying to open as many attack paths as possible, and eventually overrunning the defenders. The above video is from the defending perspective. It seems like it, mechanically, changed significantly from Warband, particularly the Napoleonic Wars DLC that I'm used to. In that mod, attackers spawn infinitely until a time limit is reached. This version apparently focuses on single-life AI armies, which Warband had as Commander Battles.

Hmm. Still no release date, though.

Intel Larrabee Post-Mortem by Tom Forsyth

Subject: Graphics Cards, Processors | August 17, 2016 - 01:38 PM |
Tagged: Xeon Phi, larrabee, Intel

Tom Forsyth, who is currently at Oculus, was once on the core Larrabee team at Intel. Just prior to Intel's IDF conference in San Francisco, which Ryan is at and covering as I type this, Tom wrote a blog post that outlined the project and its design goals, including why it didn't hit market as a graphics device. He even goes into the details of the graphics architecture, which was almost entirely in software apart from texture units and video out. For instance, Larrabee was running FreeBSD with a program, called DirectXGfx, that gave it the DirectX 11 feature set -- and it worked on hundreds of titles, too.

Intel_Xeon_Phi_Family.jpg

Also, if you found the discussion interesting, then there is plenty of content from back in the day to browse. A good example is an Intel Developer Zone post from Michael Abrash that discussed software rasterization, doing so with several really interesting stories.

Skyrim isn't done with you yet; full conversion Enderal arrives

Subject: General Tech | August 17, 2016 - 02:02 PM |
Tagged: Enderal, SureAI, mod, skyrim

 Enderal: The Shards of Order is a complete conversion of the Steam version of Skyrim into a completely new game in a brand new world.  The mod is 8 GB in size and requires a separate launcher, both available at Enderal.com and you can expect between 30 to 100 hours playtime.  You may remember this team from Nehrim, their previous total conversion mod for Oblivion.  Rock, Paper, SHOTGUN have covered this mod previously, however until now it was only available in German.  The full English version, including voice acting, is now complete and ready for you to dive into.  You might want to consider unmodding your Skyrim to install the mod, it does create a copy of the Skyrim installation so you can restore your Thomas the Tank Engine mod once you are set up. 

20131110214924-cf65c678-xl.png

"A final version of Enderal: The Shards of Order has been completed and can be downloaded for free now. While ‘Enderal’ sounds like it could be something made by a United States pharmaceutical company, it is actually a massive total conversion mod for Skyrim, not just adding new weapons or turning it into a survival game, but creating a whole new RPG using the raw materials of its parent."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Gaming

Source: rock

Lian Li Releases 550W and 750W SFX-L Power Supplies

Subject: Cases and Cooling | August 19, 2016 - 04:15 PM |
Tagged: Lian Li, SFX, SFX-L, power supply, PSU, small form-factor, 550W, 750w, PE-550, PE-750

Announced back in April, Lian Li has now released a pair of SFX-L power supplies for small form-factor systems with the PE-550 and PE-750. The pair offer fully-modular designs with flat, ribbon-style cables, and carry 80 Plus Gold and Platinum certifications.

pe750.jpg

The PE-750 power supply

"The PE-550 is 80Plus Gold-rated for a maximum 89.5% efficiency; the PE-750 is 80Plus Platinum-rated for a maximum 92% efficiency. Both use a near-silent 120mm smart fan and minimize noise by operating fanlessly when output power is below 30%. Both PSUs use a single 12V rail design for the best possible stability under heavy system load, matched with myriad protection features to ensure reliable operation."

pe550.jpg

The PE-550 power supply

For more information and full specs, the product page for the 550W PE-550 is here, and the 750W PE-750 page is here. The PE-550 and PE-750 retail for $115 and $169 respectively, and both are available now.

Source: Lian Li

Love upgrading memory on your laptop? Double check any Apollo Lake machines you like.

Subject: General Tech | August 24, 2016 - 01:01 PM |
Tagged: ultraportable, LPDDR4, Intel, apollo lake

A report from DigiTimes is bad news for those who like to upgrade their ultraportable laptops.  To cut down on production costs companies like Acer, Lenovo, Asustek Computer, HP and Dell will use on-board memory as opposed to DIMMs on their Apollo Lake based machines.  This should help keep the costs of flipbooks, 2 in 1's and other small machines stable or even lower them by a small amount but does mean that they cannot easily be upgraded. Many larger notebooks will also switch to this style of memory so be sure to do your research before purchasing a new mobile system.

industry’s-first-8-gigabit-Gb-low-power-double-data-rate-4-LPDDR4-mobile-DRAM.jpg

"Notebook vendors have mostly adopted on-board memory designs in place of DIMMs to make their Intel Apollo Lake-based notebooks as slim as possible, according to sources from Taiwan's notebook supply chain"

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: DigiTimes

Corsair's Dominator Platinum, 64GB of DDR4-3200

Subject: Memory | August 17, 2016 - 04:15 PM |
Tagged: Corsair Dominator Platinum, corsair, ddr4-3200

It will certainly cost you quite a bit to pick up but if you have a need for a huge pool of memory the 64GB Corsair Dominator Platinum DDR4-3200 kit is an option worth considering.  The default timings are 16-18-18-36 and the heat spreader and DHX cooling fins keep the DIMMs from heating up, even when Overclockers Club upped the voltage to 1.45V.  Part of the price premium is the testing which was done before these DIMMs left the factory, as well as the custom PCB and hand picked ICs which should translate to a minimum of issues running at their full speed or even when overclocked.  Pop by to see how this kit performed in OC's benchmarks.

3_thumb.jpg

"If I break it down, you get a set of modules that have been through an extensive binning process that hand selects the memory ICs being used on these modules. There is a custom designed, cooling optimized PCB that those memory IC's are mounted to so that we can enjoy a trouble free user experience. The DHX cooling solution on these modules is easily up to the task of keeping the modules cool with minimal airflow. The heat spreader and DHX cooling fins are designed to use convective cooling in the absence of any airflow over the modules."

Here are some more Memory articles from around the web:

Memory

Mozilla Publishes WebVR 1.0 to Nightly Releases

Subject: General Tech | August 20, 2016 - 05:36 PM |
Tagged: mozilla, webvr, Oculus

Earlier this month, the W3C published an Editor's Draft for WebVR 1.0. The specification has not yet been ratified, but the proposal is backed by engineers from Mozilla and Google. It enables the use of VR headsets in the web browser, including all the security required, such as isolating input to a single tab (in case you need to input a password while the HMD is on your face).

Mozilla_Firefox_logo_2013.png

Firefox Nightly, as of August 16th, now supports the draft 1.0 specification.

The browser currently supports Oculus CV1 and DK2 on Windows. It does not work with DK1, although Oculus provided backers of that KickStarter with a CV1 anyway, and it does not (yet) support the HTC Vive. It also only deals with the headset itself, not any motion controllers. I guess, if your application requires this functionality, you will need to keep working on native applications for a little while longer.

Source: Mozilla

Creatively testing GPUs with Google's Tilt Brush

Subject: Graphics Cards | August 23, 2016 - 01:43 PM |
Tagged: amd, nvidia, Tilt Brush, VR

[H]ard|OCP continues their foray into testing VR applications, this time moving away from games to try out the rather impressive Tilt Brush VR drawing application from Google.  If you have yet to see this software in action it is rather incredible, although you do still require an artist's talent and practical skills to create true 3D masterpieces. 

Artisic merit may not be [H]'s strong suite but testing how well a GPU can power VR applications certainly lies within their bailiwick.  Once again they tested five NVIDIA GPUs and a pair of AMD's for dropped frames and reprojection caused by a drop in FPS.

1471635809gU37bh4rad_6_1.jpg

"We are changing gears a bit with our VR Performance coverage and looking at an application that is not as GPU-intensive as those we have looked at in the recent past. Google's Tilt Brush is a virtual reality application that makes use of the HTC Vive head mounted display and its motion controllers to allow you to paint in 3D space."

Here are some more Graphics Card articles from around the web:

Graphics Cards

Source: [H]ard|OCP