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In Win Launches E-ATX Compatible 509 Full Tower

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 25, 2016 - 10:31 PM |
Tagged: In Win 509, in win, full tower, E-ATX Case

In Win recently took the wraps off of a high end mid full tower case called the 509. The new full tower is constructed from SECC steel and uses edge-to-edge tempered glass on the front and side panels. It measures 527mm x 235mm x 578mm (HxWxD) (which is approximately 20.78” x 9.25” x 22.75”) and comes in black with either dark gray or ROG-certified red accents. The case is available now at various retailers (such as Newegg) for a cool $184.99 plus shipping.

In Win 509 Full Tower ATX PC Case.jpg

On the outside, the In Win 509 sticks to the basics with simple lines. There are vents along the edges of the front panel and hexagonal honeycomb vents on the right side panel for ventilation in addition to vents along the bottom and rear panels. There are no top exhaust vents on this case which helps maintain the clean look. The left side panel is an edge-to-edge piece of tinted tempered glass that can be removed with four thumb screws. A magnetic system might have been a better looking choice but the screws are likely more secure and help against vibration noise.

Further, the front panel hosts a single right-aligned 5.25” bay, the front I/O (four USB 3.0 and two audio), and a large tempered glass panel. There is an LED-lit In Win logo that can be seen through the glass panel. The LED will light up red by default but if you have an RGB LED controller or RGB LED header on your motherboard you can customize the color.

Cooling is a bit less traditional on the In Win 509 and interestingly there are no included fans with the case. Users can install fans in the following positions:

  • 3 x 120mm in the front
  • 1 x 140mm on the rear panel
  • 2 x 140mm or 3 x 120mm on the bottom (including the PSU fan).

There is a large removable filter in the bottom (much to Ryan’s dismay), and users can alternatively install 360mm water cooling radiators in the side, front, or middle of the case depending on whether or not they need all the drive cages installed.

Internally, the In Win 509 supports bottom mounted power supplies with grommeted cable routing holes, E-ATX motherboards, CPU towers up to 188mm high, and graphics cards up to 370mm in length. The case offers eight PCI slots and brackets to help secure large and heavy GPUs. On the storage front, the case supports five 3.5” drives (three on bottom and two on top) as well as four 2.5” vertical bays that users can choose to install either SSDs or 120mm fans.

In WIn 509 Full Tower ATX Case.jpg

In all it looks like a well-built case and seems to be backed up by reviews. According to Bit-Tech, the In Win 509 is easy to work in and has excellent water cooling support; however, the lack of fans does hurt its out of the box cooling performance. It is available now with a three year warranty.

Source: In Win
Subject: Motherboards
Manufacturer: ASUS

Introduction and Technical Specifications

Introduction

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Courtesy of ASUS

The Rampage V Edition 10 motherboard is the latest revision of ASUS' award winning Rampage V board, bring a new level of awesome of the ROG (Republic of Gamers) product line. The board features a fully enclosed rear panel, armor plating covering the lower half of the board back, upgraded audio components, and integrated RGB LEDs throughout the board's surface. The board supports all Intel LGA2011-3 based processors paired with DDR4 memory in up to a quad channel configuration via its Intel X99 chipset. The Rampage V Edition 10 comes with a hefty MSRP of $599.99, in-line with other high-end Intel X99-based offering but in the higher tier of components nonetheless.

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Courtesy of ASUS

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Courtesy of ASUS

ASUS integrated the following features into the Rampage V Edition 10 board: 10 SATA 3 ports; one U.2 32Gbps port; one M.2 PCIe x4 capable port; dual GigE controllers - an Intel I218-V Gigabit NIC and an Intel I210 Gigabit NIC; 3x3 802.11ac WiFI adapter; four PCI-Express x16 slots; two PCI-Express x1 slots; on-board power, reset, MemOK!, Retry, BIOS Switch, Safe Boot, Clear CMOS, and USB BIOS Flashback buttons; Slow Mode and Multi GPU mode switches; PCIe and DIMM lane switch blocks; LN2 Mode jumper; Aura LED 12V power header; 2-digit Q-Code LED diagnostic display; ROG SupremeFX 8-Channel audio subsystem with SupremeFX Hi-Fi adapter; and USB 3.0 and 3.1 Type-A and Type-C port support. ASUS also included their Fan Extension controller card with the board.

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Courtesy of ASUS

To better protect the critical components on the back of the board PCB, ASUS integrated an armored back plate covering the lower half of the PCB's back. the backplate covers the lower DIMM slot set traces and extends to cover the chipset area on teh left side of the board.

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Courtesy of ASUS

The Rampage V Edition 10 features an eight phase digital power system, providing more than enough power to the CPU for whatever you choose to throw at it. The power delivery system itself consists of Infineon PowIRStage IR3555 MOSFETs, MicroFine alloy chokes, and 10k-rated Japanese-sourced black-metallic capacitors.

Continue reading our preview of the ASUS Rampage V Edition 10 motherboard!

The toasters are revolting!

Subject: General Tech | September 26, 2016 - 01:01 PM |
Tagged: iot, security, upnp

Over the weekend you might have noticed some issues on your favourite interwebs as there was a rather impressively sized DDOS attack going on.  The attack was a mix of old and new techniques; they leveraged the uPNP protocol which has always been a favourite vector but the equipment hijacked were IoT appliances.  The processing power available in toasters, DVRs and even webcams is now sufficient to be utilized and is generally a damned sight easier to control than even an old unpatched XP machine.  This does not spell the end of the world which will likely be predicted on the cable news networks but does further illustrate the danger in companies producing inherently insecure IoT devices.  If you are not sure what uPNP is, or are aware but do not currently need it, consider disabling it on your router or think about setting up something along the lines of ye olde three router solution

Hack a Day has links to a bit more information on what happened here.

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"Brace yourselves. The rest of the media is going to be calling this an “IoT DDOS” and the hype will spin out of control. Hype aside, the facts on the ground make it look like an extremely large distributed denial-of-service attack (DDOS) was just carried out using mostly household appliances (145,607 of them!) rather than grandma’s old Win XP system running on Pentiums."

Here is some more Tech News from around the web:

Tech Talk

Source: Hack a Day

The AS330 Panther 960GB SSD is branded Apacer but what matters is what is inside

Subject: Storage | September 26, 2016 - 01:42 PM |
Tagged: tlc, Phison PS3110-S10, AS330 Panther, apacer, 960GB SSD

Almost everyone seems to be making SATA SSDs these days, the market is much more crowded that at this time last year which can make your purchasing decisions more complicated.  If you cannot afford the new M.2 and PCIe SSDs but are instead looking for a SATA SSD then your choices are varied and you cannot necessarily depend on price when you make your decision.

The internals are what really determines the value you are getting from an SSD, in this case the AS330 uses the four channel Phison PS3110-S10 controller, 15nm Toshiba TLC NAND and has a 512GB DDR3L-1600 cache.  This puts it in the same class as many other value priced SSDs from companies like PNY and Kingston.  Hardware Canucks' testing proves this to be true, the drive is a bit slower than the OCZ Trion 150 but is solidly in the middle of the pack of comparable SSDs.  The price you can find the drive will be the deciding factor, the 960GB model should sell around $200, the 480GB model is currently $120 on Newegg.

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"Apacer's AS330 Panther SSD is inexpensive, offers good performance and has capacity to burn. But can this drive roar or will a lack of brand recognition cause it to purr out to obscurity? "

Here are some more Storage reviews from around the web:

Storage

A pair of cases from Zalman, the NEW Z0 and Z11

Subject: Cases and Cooling | September 26, 2016 - 03:04 PM |
Tagged: zalman, neo, Z9 Neo, Z11 Neo

Zalman's Z9 and Z11 NEO are fairly similar, the Z9 is 205x490x482mm and the Z11 is slightly larger at 205x520x515mm which allows for more cooling options to be installed.  Using the default fan installation Overclockers Club saw slightly better CPU temperatures on the Z9, the GPU measured the same in both cases; adding fans to the Z11 will obviously help it take the lead.  Drop by to see their full review of both cases, including video.

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"Reviewing both cases at the same time makes it interesting. You get to directly compare them with each other. Both of these cases are similar in size, and the feature sets are also fairly close. Neither case stood out much from the other - I like the style of the Z11 a little more, but the Z9 comes with a better compliment of fans. The use of space is also similar in both cases, although the I like the cable management a little better on the Z9 with the lower compartment that hides the power supply - but then you are covering up a power supply you may want to show off. And the Z11 has the cool, removable hard drive cages."

Here are some more Cases & Cooling reviews from around the web:

CASES & COOLING